By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

SAG-AFTRA Calls for End to Auditions and Interviews in Private Hotel Rooms or Residences

Union Issues Guideline No. 1 as Part of SAG-AFTRA Code of Conduct on Sexual Harassment

LOS ANGELES (April 12, 2018) – To help protect members from potential harassment and exploitation, SAG-AFTRA released today a Guideline that calls for an end to the practice of holding professional meetings in private hotel rooms or residences.

This is the first expansion of the Code of Conduct, which the union published in February as part of its Four Pillars of Change initiative to confront harassment and advance equity in the industry. Following input from members, experts and industry stakeholders, Guideline No. 1 reflects SAG-AFTRA’s dedication to upholding professional standards and addressing the unprofessional and unlawful workplace culture that too many of our members face. Click here to read.

“We are committed to addressing the scenario that has allowed predators to exploit performers behind closed doors under the guise of a professional meeting,” said SAG-AFTRA President Gabrielle Carteris.

Guideline No. 1 calls upon producers and other decision makers to refrain from holding professional meetings in hotel rooms and private residences. It also urges members and their representatives not to agree to professional meetings in these high-risk locations. In the rare event that there is no reasonable alternative to having the meeting in such a location, Guideline No. 1 establishes the concept of a “Support Peer” to accompany the member during the meeting.

As emphasized in SAG-AFTRA’s Code of Conduct, Guideline No. 1 is equally applicable to SAG-AFTRA members when acting in the capacity of a producer or decision maker with influence or control over decisions that can impact another’s career. All professionals, including SAG-AFTRA members, are expected to refrain from engaging in harassing conduct and support efforts to eliminate this scourge from the workplace.

As part of its Four Pillars of Change initiative, the union will periodically issue additional Guidelines to provide further insight into steps that members and industry partners can take to expand workplace safety in our industry.

About SAG-AFTRA
SAG-AFTRA represents approximately 160,000 actors, announcers, broadcast journalists, dancers, DJs, news writers, news editors, program hosts, puppeteers, recording artists, singers, stunt performers, voiceover artists and other entertainment and media professionals. SAG-AFTRA members are the faces and voices that entertain and inform America and the world. A proud affiliate of the AFL-CIO, SAG-AFTRA has national offices in Los Angeles and New York and local offices nationwide representing members working together to secure the strongest protections for entertainment and media artists into the 21st century and beyond. Visit SAG-AFTRA online at SAGAFTRA.org.

 

Comments are closed.

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch