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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Friday Estimates By Len Klady COMMENTS CLOSED

Screen Shot 2018-04-14 at 9.56.47 AM

16 Responses to “Friday Estimates By Len Klady COMMENTS CLOSED”

  1. Stella's Boy says:

    I thought Rampage would make a good matinee on a crappy day. I enjoyed San Andreas, I like The Rock, and the trailer suggested dumb fun. But mostly it’s just dumb. It’s pretty unimaginative and the spectacle isn’t anything special. It looks cheap at times and this is as close as The Rock gets to phoning it in. There’s not even all that much mayhem after the monsters make it to Chicago. OK at best. Not surprised by its box office. Anecdotal but my screening was nearly empty despite perfect moviegoing weather.

  2. JSPartisan says:

    Warner’s marketing never explained what’s going on in Rampage. I have no idea if this is just a 2018 thing, but Rampage having trailers that never explained what the movie is about, other than marketing based around the Rock. I know we all love him, but goofy movies need more than just, “Hey! Rock!” You need to explain this premise, and hope people get invested. Rampage fell into that marketing trap, and people seemingly don’t go for just star power anymore. Malin Ackerman is the villain in that movie, but god forbid they explain some villain motivation!

    A Quiet Place sold itself remarkably well, and people showed up. Good on Paramount for figuring shit out.

  3. Stella's Boy says:

    OK so Malin Ackerman and her brother… I can’t. It’s too stupid.

  4. movieman says:

    Is “Sgt. Stubby” going to have one of the lowest opening weekend grosses for a wide-ish release?
    Did someone actually think a theatrical release was good business?

    Btw, what is “Fun Academy” anyway?

  5. Stella's Boy says:

    I wondered that too. Apparently they are a Georgia-based distributor focusing on family films.

  6. JSPartisan says:

    SB, I know stupid, but audience want to know WHY it’s stupid. Trailers that explain the whole film are the worst, but audiences in 2018 want some explanation. They want a, “Why?” The studios keep answering with, “Why not?” That’s just a stupid strategy.

  7. Stella's Boy says:

    I had completely forgotten she was in it and had no idea Jake Lacy is in it. It’s a weird movie but sadly for the most part not in a good or fun way.

  8. movieman says:

    Ehh. I didn’t hate “Rampage” (I did hate “San Andreas,” but that’s another story).
    Found it generally tolerable, if distinctly, even stubbornly unmemorable.
    My 6-year-old self might have loved it, though.
    Not surprised WB essentially tossed it away in the narrow window before “Infinity” storms theaters like the D-Day invasion.

    Really wanted to see “Beirut” this weekend. (Love Hamm, Pellegrino and Whigham.) Too bad it’s not playing anywhere remotely near me

    “Borg Vs. McEnroe” is available as a VOD on many PPV sites, including Amazon. Which probably explains its barely discernible “theatrical” footprint this weekend.

  9. Pete B. says:

    Sgt Stubby had 5 people in our viewing.

  10. Stella's Boy says:

    Everyone I know hates San Andreas. I don’t think it’s particularly good, but I enjoy the destruction porn and find it easy to watch. Agree on Rampage though. Stubbornly unmemorable is a good way to put it. Giant monsters attacking Chicago should be way more fun.

  11. Hcat says:

    Bring on The Meg!!!!! Maybe that can succeed where Rim and Rampage failed.

  12. JSPartisan says:

    Meg is a Chinese production, so it will be fine.

  13. Stella's Boy says:

    The Meg is going to be awesome.

  14. Joe Leydon says:

    Sgt. Stubby actually is entertaining. But I wonder if this is one of those films that would have found a bigger audience back in the day when more distributors bought newspaper ads — and more people read print editions of newspapers?

  15. Pete B says:

    You’re probably 100% correct Joe. The older folks who actually still read newspapers would also be more interested in a WWI film.

    The whole reason I even knew about the film was one of those Front & Center features when you get to the theater early.

    One thing I appreciated was that the dog was a dog. Animated yes, but he didn’t talk or act human.

  16. Joe Leydon says:

    The funny thing is, I thought the WWI subject matter would help the movie so soon after Wonder Woman reintroduced a new generation to The War To End All Wars. And yes: The dog was a dog, and that was a good thing.

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