By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Rotten Tomatoes Gets New Editor-in-Chief

[pr] ROTTEN TOMATOES NAMES JOEL MEARES AS NEW EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Los Angeles, CA (February 27, 2018– Rotten Tomatoes, entertainment fans’ go-to destination for movie and TV show reviews and information, today announced that it has named Joel Meares as Editor-in-Chief.

In his role, Meares will oversee editorial content and expansion as Rotten Tomatoes continues to build a multi-platform destination for opinion and debate. He will also shape new editorial ideas, approaches, events, franchises and opportunities inspired by analytical data and fandom. Meares will lead editorial and content efforts for international growth as the site continues to expand its influence globally.

“I am thrilled to begin working with the incredible team of film and television fanatics at Rotten Tomatoes,” Meares said. “I have been a fan of their engaging editorial content and the trusted Tomatometer for years and look forward to continuing to grow the brand across all of its platforms.”

Most recently, Meares served as the Global Editor-in-Chief of Time Out Digital where he oversaw content strategy for all Time Out owned-and-operated properties and franchises, including flagship titles in London and New York, and managed regional heads of content in Europe, North America, Australia and Asia. Before that, he headed up content for the brand in North America following his time as editor of Time Out Sydney.

“We are thrilled to further expand our breadth of content and continue our commitment to excellent film and television journalism,” said Jeff Voris, Vice President, Rotten Tomatoes. “The team at Rotten Tomatoes is excited to work with and learn from Joel Meares. I am immensely impressed by his passion and commitment to film and television and the impact his opinions have had within larger cultural conversations. His track record at Time Out and elsewhere speaks for itself and we look forward to seeing him grow our editorial offerings for our passionate fans.”

Prior to joining Time Out, Meares was the Arts Editor of The Sydney Morning Herald, a staff writer for the Herald’s the(sydney) magazine and wrote on politics and the media as associate editor for the Columbia Journalism Review. He has contributed to Wired, The Guardian, Travel + Leisure (Australia) and numerous other publications. In 2015, Black Inc. published Meares’ first book, We’re All Going to Die (Especially Me).

Meares graduated with honors from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism with a MS in Journalism.

Rotten Tomatoes is used by millions of fans to help with their entertainment viewing decisions, offering useful tools, information and the world-famous Tomatometer rating. The Tomatometer is an easy-to-understand score that represents the collective opinion of thousands of critics. For those who want to dig deeper, the site provides a critics consensus, access to full reviews as well as an audience score all in one place.

 About Rotten Tomatoes

Rotten Tomatoes is the go-to platform for movie and TV show debate and discussion and home of the world-famous Tomatometer rating, visited frequently by millions of fans to help with their entertainment viewing decisions. An online aggregator of movie and TV reviews from professional critics, Rotten Tomatoes uses the Tomatometer to measure the percentage of reviews that are positive.  Movies and TV shows that receive a Tomatometer rating of 75% or higher, after enough reviews have been received, are deemed “Certified Fresh,” one of the industry’s most sought-after honors.

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“Why put it in a box? This is the number one problem I have—by the way it’s a fair question, I’m not saying that—with this kind of festival situation is that there’s always this temptation to classify the movie immediately and if you look at it—and I’ve tried to warn my fellow jurors of this—directors and movie critics are the worst people to judge movies! Directors are always thinking, “I could do that.” Critics are always saying, “This part of the movie is like the 1947 version and this part…” And it’s like, “Fuck! Just watch the movie and try and absorb it and not compare it to some other fucking movie and put it in a box!” So I think the answer’s both and maybe neither, I don’t know. That’s for you to see and criticize me for or not.”
~ James Gray

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~ Karyn Kusama