By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

TRUE/FALSE & THE CROSSING TO ANNOUNCE THE 2018 TRUE LIFE FUND FILM AND NEW TRAVELING DOCUMENTARY SERIES.

Columbia, Missouri – True/False and The Crossing invite members of the press and community to The Crossing on Wednesday, January 17th at 9:00AM CST when they will announce the 2018 True Life Fund Film along with a new outgrowth of the partnership, the Alethea Project: a 10-week traveling documentary screening series that will take place in large evangelical churches around the Midwest and West.

In 2009, The Crossing joined the True/False Film Fest in presenting the True Life Fund: a crowd-sourced award to honor the subject(s) of a single documentary and thank them for sharing their story. Described in depth by Christianity Today and the New York Times, the True Life Fund allowed these surprising partners to find common values and build a framework of trust and cooperation that benefit both.

Furthering the partnership, The Alethea Project will begin in the Fall of 2018 when representatives from True/False and The Crossing visit churches and screen recent nonfiction films with topics that invite robust post-screening discussions among filmmakers, a moderator, and a representative from the church. Film topics will include race in America, climate change, refugees and immigration, healthcare and health crises, the death penalty, guns control, sexuality and gender.

The Alethea Project is founded on the belief that honest conversation and intelligent debate around ideas strengthens our understanding of those with whom we disagree. Documentary film provides opportunity for conversation, understanding, and the construction of a more vibrant and multifaceted community. The Alethea Project seeks to positively impact the public’s impression of documentary films and their makers – and build appreciation for nonfiction as an art form.

The press conference will be held by True/False co-director David Wilson and Crossing co-pastor Dave Cover. They will discuss the project, partnership, show a clip from the True Life Fund Film, and answer questions. The event will also be streamed live on The Crossing’s Facebook page. Both organizations invite those unable to attend to watch online and ask questions via Facebook (@TheCrossingCoMo) or Twitter (@truefalse).

The press conference will take place in room 227 at The Crossing. The Crossing is located at 3615 Southland Drive, Columbia, Missouri 65203. To access room 227 please park in the main lot and enter through the south facing doors. Follow signs to room 227.

The Alethea Project is funded in part by the Bertha Foundation and Impact Partners and is currently seeking additional funders.

For more information about the True Life Fund, visit truelifefund.org

For more information about the Alethea Project, visit aletheaproject.org

The fifteenth True/False Film Fest will take place March 1-4, 2018 in downtown Columbia, Missouri. For more information, please visit truefalse.org.

The Crossing is a local church in Columbia, Missouri with a weekly attendance of 4,000 people. For more information, please visit thecrossingchurch.com.

Comments are closed.

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch