By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

TRUE/FALSE & THE CROSSING TO ANNOUNCE THE 2018 TRUE LIFE FUND FILM AND NEW TRAVELING DOCUMENTARY SERIES.

Columbia, Missouri – True/False and The Crossing invite members of the press and community to The Crossing on Wednesday, January 17th at 9:00AM CST when they will announce the 2018 True Life Fund Film along with a new outgrowth of the partnership, the Alethea Project: a 10-week traveling documentary screening series that will take place in large evangelical churches around the Midwest and West.

In 2009, The Crossing joined the True/False Film Fest in presenting the True Life Fund: a crowd-sourced award to honor the subject(s) of a single documentary and thank them for sharing their story. Described in depth by Christianity Today and the New York Times, the True Life Fund allowed these surprising partners to find common values and build a framework of trust and cooperation that benefit both.

Furthering the partnership, The Alethea Project will begin in the Fall of 2018 when representatives from True/False and The Crossing visit churches and screen recent nonfiction films with topics that invite robust post-screening discussions among filmmakers, a moderator, and a representative from the church. Film topics will include race in America, climate change, refugees and immigration, healthcare and health crises, the death penalty, guns control, sexuality and gender.

The Alethea Project is founded on the belief that honest conversation and intelligent debate around ideas strengthens our understanding of those with whom we disagree. Documentary film provides opportunity for conversation, understanding, and the construction of a more vibrant and multifaceted community. The Alethea Project seeks to positively impact the public’s impression of documentary films and their makers – and build appreciation for nonfiction as an art form.

The press conference will be held by True/False co-director David Wilson and Crossing co-pastor Dave Cover. They will discuss the project, partnership, show a clip from the True Life Fund Film, and answer questions. The event will also be streamed live on The Crossing’s Facebook page. Both organizations invite those unable to attend to watch online and ask questions via Facebook (@TheCrossingCoMo) or Twitter (@truefalse).

The press conference will take place in room 227 at The Crossing. The Crossing is located at 3615 Southland Drive, Columbia, Missouri 65203. To access room 227 please park in the main lot and enter through the south facing doors. Follow signs to room 227.

The Alethea Project is funded in part by the Bertha Foundation and Impact Partners and is currently seeking additional funders.

For more information about the True Life Fund, visit truelifefund.org

For more information about the Alethea Project, visit aletheaproject.org

The fifteenth True/False Film Fest will take place March 1-4, 2018 in downtown Columbia, Missouri. For more information, please visit truefalse.org.

The Crossing is a local church in Columbia, Missouri with a weekly attendance of 4,000 people. For more information, please visit thecrossingchurch.com.

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“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady

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~ Fabrice Aragno