By The Daily Buzz davidpoland@sbcglobal.net

The Daily Buzz from Sundance (Day 5)

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Today’s episode starts with a hot-topics roundtable discussion with Joshua Rothkopf, Jim Brunzell And Andrew Fish. Our second panel covers Akicita: The Battle for Standing Rock, with documentarians Gingger Shankar and Cody Lucich, as well as a figure who was onsite at Standing Rock. We conclude with Quiet Heroes‘ Jared Ruga and Amanda Stoddard.

Monday, January 22, 2018

Day Four offers great insight for listeners furthering film careers. We speak with Carrie Lozano and Simon Kilmurry of the International Documentary Association. Pascal Plante, director of <b>Fake Tattoos </b>drops by, as well as the director and cast of <b>Funny Story</b>, Michael Gallagher, Matthew Glave, Jana Wintimitz and Emily Bett Rickards.

Sunday, January 21, 2018

Day Three ranges across film genres and guests. We start off with the Russo brothers who are here at the Sundance film festival to receive the Founders Award from Slamdance, along with Peter Baxter from Slamdance. We move on Rainbow Experiment director Christina Kallas and Isaiah Blake, a part of the cast. Closing the podcast: the We the Animals feature team.

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Day 2 of Sundance 2018 is up and running, and filled to the brim with snow! Today’s episode starts with City Weekly’s Scott Renshaw, a juror for Slamdance film competitions. We also have Anote Tong and Matthieu Rytz of the film Anote’s Ark discussing the literal sinking of the island of Kiribati and raising awareness around climate change, and ends with a moving feature film White Rabbit with director Daryl Wein and cast Vivian Bang and Nana Ghana.

Friday, January 19, 2018

It’s officially Day One of Sundance 2018, and the first episode for The Daily Buzz is packed with amazing films. This episode begins with a heartwarming tribute to the late Irene Cho, the founder of Daily Buzz; moves on to a fascinating account of the lives and training of service dogs in Pick of the Litter, made by Dana Nachman and Don Hardy; and ends with a packed panel with Nick Offerman, Kersey Clemons and Brett Haley for Hearts Beat Loud.

Comments are closed.

Quote Unquotesee all »

“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady

“You know how in postproduction you are supposed to color-correct the picture so everything is smooth and even? Jean-Luc wants the opposite. He wants the rupture. Color and then black and white, or different intensities of color. Or how in this film, sometimes you see the ratio of the frame change after the image begins. That happens when he records from his TV onto his old DVCAM analog machine, which is so old we can’t even find parts when it needs to be repaired. The TV takes time to recognize and adjust to the format on the DVD or the Blu-ray. Whether it’s 1:33 or 1:85. And one of the TVs he uses is slower than the other. He wants to keep all that. I could correct it, but he doesn’t want me to. See, here’s an image from War and Peace. He did the overlays of color—red, white, and blue—using an old analog video effects machine. That’s why you have the blur. When I tried to redo it in digital, I couldn’t. The edges were too sharp. And why the image jitters—I don’t know how he did that. Playing with the cable maybe. Handmade. He wants to see that. It’s a gift from his old machine.”
~ Fabrice Aragno