By Kim Voynar Voynar@moviecitynews.com

Sundance New Frontiers Review: BattleScar

When you walk into the physical installation for BattleScar, a new virtual reality (VR)  project by filmmakers Martin Allais and Nico Casavecchia, you find yourself in a room that resembles a rather clean, well-decorated squat. Slip into the headset and you’re in 1978 New York City where you’ll follow Lupe, a Puerto Rican-American teen and her tough-talking fellow runaway Debbie, through their adventures navigating the ‘70s punk scene in Alphabet City. Debbie dreams of forming a punk rock band but can’t write lyrics, and she finds a connection in Lupe, an aspiring poet; together, the two of them explore New York’s Lower East Side, punk rock and poetry together.

Storywise, that’s pretty much it for this demo of BattleScar at Sundance New Frontier – the first of what’s intended to be a three-episode series exploring the year in Lupe’s life when it intersects with Debbie’s, using an innovative combination of animation and the immersiveness of virtual reality, with some creative explorations of the use of scale within VR and animation to guide the observer through a virtual story.

BattleScar doesn’t use controllers, a trend in VR content. Conventional wisdom of interactive VR design would dictate that no controllers equals no interactivity, but here the creators overcome that with some very creatively constructed design elements that guide you through Lupe’s story, taking you back-and-forth between fully immersive 360 scenes, and scenes in which a miniature diorama stage and characters appear in front of you, suspended. You can walk right up to it, peer closely at the miniature characters acting out their scene, examine it from different angles. Imagine you’ve stepped inside a graphic novel and it’s sprung to life around you, and occasionally there are call-out frames in 3D in which parts of scenes play out, and you’ve kind of got the idea here. It’s very cool and impressively imagined in spite of the lack of interactivity one tends to expect from room-scale VR.

I wouldn’t call BattleScar ready for primetime in this iteration, but I do consider it an exceptionally strong pilot episode for an immersive episodic series that shows tremendous promise. It may seem an odd choice for two male filmmakers to choose to write a story focused on two strong female characters (one of the filmmakers told me that production designer Mercedes Arturo, who has a “Story by” credit on the project, consulted with them to ensure that the story and characters felt authentically female). Rosario Dawson’s on-point narration further lends both credibility and a sense of who these girls are. The team also put a tremendous amount of work into the period authenticity of the piece, and the overall result feels very much like stepping into a graphic novel set in that time and place.

BattleScar eschews use of controllers in this iteration, which is a good choice for demonstrating how someone might be likely to experience it in a 360 headset like the Samsung Gear or the upcoming Oculus Go, hotly anticipated by 360 filmmakers for its significantly lower price point of $200. On the other hand, as someone who is super familiar with the ways in which one can interact in VR, there are also ways in which I’d love to see the filmmakers expand upon the interactivity of this iteration as they build it out. This story world is set among punk street kids in 1978 NYC and graffiti, while it may be thought of more as related to hip-hop, was also pivotal part of NYC’s hardcore punk scene. It would be cool to delve more into that and to tag graffiti alongside the characters. There’s also more that could be done with both Lupe’s journal and with the story’s references to “Howl” that are begging to be more fleshed out, and now that they’ve solidly nailed this iteration on a tight Sundance deadline, I hope to see the filmmakers build on what they’ve done and keep thinking outside the frame in exploring and pushing not just how to tell their story in immersive 360 space, but why they’re telling their story in 360.

BattleScar was co-produced by new VR production company Atlas V, which was formed late last year by VR veterans Arnaud Colinart (Notes on Blindness), Antoine Cayrol and Pierre Zandrowicz (I, Philip) and Fred Volhuer (Shuttershades); Kaleidoscope and 1st Ave Machine, and  the technical support the filmmakers had in realizing their storytelling vision is evident here. I was surprised to learn in talking to the filmmakers after I experienced BattleScar that neither Allais nor Casavecchia are actually VR developers – they are filmmakers who had this project they’d come up with, and one of them had a friendship with someone who made an intro so they could pitch it, and now here they are at Sundance.

This may seem like a minor side-note to this review, but for someone who works within the VR space as I do, BattleScar heralds an important shift in the pattern: Up to and including last year’s Sundance New Frontier and the 2017 SXSW Virtual Cinema (for which I served on the inaugural jury), I would say the vast majority of content we were seeing was being developed around the technology first, with story second. Atlas V in particular was founded with an intent to support the creation of content by filmmakers who don’t necessarily have VR development chops, but who are highly creative storytellers; if they succeed at this model, it would be a huge and favorable shift for other filmmakers looking to transition into the wide-open immersive storytelling frontier.

 

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“Film festivals, for those who don’t know, are not exactly the glitzy red carpet affairs you see on TV. Those do happen, but they’re a tiny part of the festival. The main part of any film festival are the thousands of people with festival passes hanging on lanyards beneath their anoraks, carrying brochures for movies you have never and will never hear of, desperately scrabbling to sell whatever movie it is to buyers from all over the world. Every hotel bar, every cafe, every restaurant is filled to the brim with these people, talking loudly about non-existent deals. The Brits are the worst because most of the British film industry, with a few honourable exceptions, are scam artists and chancers who move around from company to company failing to get anything good made and trying to cast Danny Dyer in anything that moves. I’m seeing guys here who I first met twenty years ago and who are still wearing the same clothes, doing the same job (albeit for a different company) and spinning the same line of bullshit about how THIS movie has Al Pacino or Meryl Streep or George Clooney attached and, whilst that last one didn’t work out, THIS ONE is going to be HUGE. As the day goes on, they start drinking and it all gets ugly and, well, that’s why I’m the guy walking through the Tiergarten with a camera taking pictures of frozen lakes and pretending this isn’t happening.

“Berlin is cool, though and I’ve been lucky to be doing meetings with some people who want to actually get things done. We’ll see what comes of it.”
~ Julian Simpson 

“The difference between poetry and prose, and why if you’re not acculturated to poetry, you might resist it: that page is frightening. Why is it not filled? The two categories of people who don’t feel that way are children and prisoners. So many prison poets; they see that gap and experience it differently. I’m for the gap!”
~ Poet Eileen Myles