By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

GENE SISKEL FILM CENTER KICKS OFF AWARDS SEASON WITH 90TH ANNUAL OSCAR NOMINATIONS PANEL, JANUARY 23, 2018

GENE SISKEL FILM CENTER KICKS OFF AWARDS SEASON WITH 90TH ANNUAL
OSCAR NOMINATIONS PANEL, JANUARY 23, 2018
Panel Discussion Features Top Chicago Film Critics
J.R. Jones, Sergio Mims, Michael Phillips, Pamela Powell and Ray Pride
CHICAGO — The Gene Siskel Film Center (GSFC) of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) presents the 90th Academy Awards® Nominations Panel Tuesday, January 23, 2018. CBS Radio Morning Drive News Co-Anchor Felicia Middelbrooks will moderate a lively panel discussion—discussing the snubs and shoe-ins—with Chicago film critics J.R. Jones (Chicago Reader), Sergio Mims (Shadow and Act, WHPK 88.5 Chicago), Michael Phillips (Chicago Tribune), Pamela Powell (FF2 Media) and Ray Pride (Newcity).
“Once again, we can come together and celebrate an incredible year of film, filled with nuanced performances and heartfelt, poignant stories,” said GSFC Executive Director Jean de St. Aubin. “Our esteemed panel of film critics will shine a light on films we may have missed or present a different perspective on films we have already seen, and it’s always entertaining to hear them go toe to toe defending their top picks for the broadcast in March.”
This free event will be held at the Film Center (164 N. State St.) from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. and will be followed by a post event reception featuring small bites. Guests are invited to RSVP at siskelfilmcenter.org/specialevents to reserve their seats, and will automatically be entered into a drawing for a pair of tickets to “Hollywood on State: Where You’re the Star” (a $200 value). The winner will be selected at the Nominations Panel (you must be present to win).
About the Gene Siskel Film Center
Since 1972, the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago has presented cutting edge cinema to an annual audience of 85,000. The Film Center’s programming includes annual film festivals that celebrate diverse voices and international cultures, premieres of trailblazing work by today’s independent filmmakers, restorations and revivals of essential films from cinema history, and insightful provocative discussions with filmmakers and media artists. Altogether, the Film Center hosts over 1,600 screenings and 200 filmmaker appearances every year. The Film Center was renamed the Gene Siskel Film Center in 2000 after the late, nationally celebrated film critic, Gene Siskel. Visit www.siskelfilmcenter.org to learn more and find out what’s playing today.
The Gene Siskel Film Center and SAIC are part of The Art Institute of Chicago.

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