By MCN Editor editor@moviecitynews.com

GENE SISKEL FILM CENTER KICKS OFF AWARDS SEASON WITH 90TH ANNUAL OSCAR NOMINATIONS PANEL, JANUARY 23, 2018

GENE SISKEL FILM CENTER KICKS OFF AWARDS SEASON WITH 90TH ANNUAL
OSCAR NOMINATIONS PANEL, JANUARY 23, 2018
Panel Discussion Features Top Chicago Film Critics
J.R. Jones, Sergio Mims, Michael Phillips, Pamela Powell and Ray Pride
CHICAGO — The Gene Siskel Film Center (GSFC) of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) presents the 90th Academy Awards® Nominations Panel Tuesday, January 23, 2018. CBS Radio Morning Drive News Co-Anchor Felicia Middelbrooks will moderate a lively panel discussion—discussing the snubs and shoe-ins—with Chicago film critics J.R. Jones (Chicago Reader), Sergio Mims (Shadow and Act, WHPK 88.5 Chicago), Michael Phillips (Chicago Tribune), Pamela Powell (FF2 Media) and Ray Pride (Newcity).
“Once again, we can come together and celebrate an incredible year of film, filled with nuanced performances and heartfelt, poignant stories,” said GSFC Executive Director Jean de St. Aubin. “Our esteemed panel of film critics will shine a light on films we may have missed or present a different perspective on films we have already seen, and it’s always entertaining to hear them go toe to toe defending their top picks for the broadcast in March.”
This free event will be held at the Film Center (164 N. State St.) from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. and will be followed by a post event reception featuring small bites. Guests are invited to RSVP at siskelfilmcenter.org/specialevents to reserve their seats, and will automatically be entered into a drawing for a pair of tickets to “Hollywood on State: Where You’re the Star” (a $200 value). The winner will be selected at the Nominations Panel (you must be present to win).
About the Gene Siskel Film Center
Since 1972, the Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago has presented cutting edge cinema to an annual audience of 85,000. The Film Center’s programming includes annual film festivals that celebrate diverse voices and international cultures, premieres of trailblazing work by today’s independent filmmakers, restorations and revivals of essential films from cinema history, and insightful provocative discussions with filmmakers and media artists. Altogether, the Film Center hosts over 1,600 screenings and 200 filmmaker appearances every year. The Film Center was renamed the Gene Siskel Film Center in 2000 after the late, nationally celebrated film critic, Gene Siskel. Visit www.siskelfilmcenter.org to learn more and find out what’s playing today.
The Gene Siskel Film Center and SAIC are part of The Art Institute of Chicago.

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The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda