By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Cinema Eye Honors Set Legacy Award; Heterodox Award Nominees

When We Were Kings to Receive 2018 Cinema Eye Legacy Award
Heterodox Nominees Announced: Films That Blur the Line Between Fiction & Documentary
December 6, 2017 | New York City NY – Cinema Eye today announced that Leon Gast’s When We Were Kings is the recipient of the 2018 Legacy Award, a recognition of classic nonfiction filmmaking that continues to inspire new generations of filmmakers and remains as relevant today as it was when it was first released.
“At a time when sports, race and political protest are swirling together in the news, it is the perfect moment to honor Leon Gast’s brilliant documentary about one of The Greatest figures in sports history, a man unafraid to speak out on race, war or politics, Muhammad Ali,” said filmmaker Marshall Curry, Cinema Eye Co-Chair.
Cinema Eye also announced the five films that have been nominated this year for its annual Heterodox Award, honoring films that actively blur the line between narrative fiction and documentary. The films nominated are:
●     The Florida Project | Directed by Sean Baker
●     Menashe | Directed by Joshua Z Weinstein
●     The Rider | Directed by Chloé Zhao
●     Stranger in Paradise | Directed by Guido Hendrikx
●     You Have No Idea How Much I Love You | Directed by Pawel Lozinski
This marks the eighth year for the Heterodox Award at Cinema Eye. Previous winners of the award are Matt Porterfield’s Putty Hill (2011), Mike Mills’ Beginners (2012), Jem Cohen’s Museum Hours (2013), Carlos Reygados’s Post Tenebras Lux (2014), Richard Linklater’s Boyhood (2015), Jafar Panahi’s Taxi (2016) and Michal Marczak’s All These Sleepless Nights (2017).
Sean Baker’s nomination for The Florida Project makes him the first filmmaker in Cinema Eye history to be nominated twice for the Heterodox Award. He was previously recognized for Tangerine in 2016. Guido Hendrikx’ Stranger in Paradise was also named last month as a nominee for the Cinema Eye Spotlight Award. It’s the first time that a film has been recognized in both categories.
With the announcement of this year’s Legacy Award recipient and Heterodox nominees, all of this year’s Cinema Eye nominated films and filmmakers have been revealed.
The Heterodox Award winner will be announced and the Legacy Award will be presented to director Leon Gast on Wednesday, January 10 at the annual Honors Lunch in Manhattan. There will be a screening of When We Were Kings, followed by a Q&A with Gast, that evening at the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens.
Ten finalists for the Heterodox Award were selected in voting by the Cinema Eye Honors Nominations Committee, made up of more than 25 international programmers who specialize in nonfiction film. The ten finalists were then viewed and five nominees were selected by a second round committee, composed of 8 nonfiction programmers and journalists. The second round included Eric Allen Hatch (Director of Programming, Maryland Film Festival), Anna Rose Holmer (The Fits), Eric Hynes (Associate Curator of Film, Museum of the Moving Image), Rachel Jacobson (Executive Director, Film Streams), Doug Jones (Executive Director, Images Cinema), Aliza Ma (Head of Programming, Metrograph), Rachael Rakes (Programmer at Large, Art of the Real) and Alison Willmore (Film Critic, Buzzfeed).
About Cinema Eye, Cinema Eye Week and the 2018 Cinema Eye Honors
Cinema Eye was founded in 2007 to recognize excellence in artistry and craft in nonfiction filmmaking. It was the first and remains the only international nonfiction award to recognize the whole creative team, presenting annual craft awards in directing, producing, cinematography, editing, composing and graphic design/animation. Cinema Eye presents and produces the annual Cinema Eye Week and Honors Ceremony.
The Honors Ceremony is the centerpiece of Cinema Eye Week, a multi-day, multi-city celebration that acknowledges the best work in nonfiction film through screenings and events. The final four days of Cinema Eye Week take place in New York City, where a series of celebratory events brought together many of the year’s most accomplished filmmakers. This year’s dates are January 8-11, with awards presented at the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens on Thursday, January 11th, 2018.
Nonfiction film nominations in 12 categories were announced last month in San Francisco at SFFILM Doc Stories. A full list of all 2018 nominees can be found on the Cinema Eye Honors website: www.cinemaeyehonors.com.
 Follow Cinema Eye on Twitter: twitter.com/cinemaeyehonors and on Facebook: facebook.com/CinemaEyeHonors

Comments are closed.

Quote Unquotesee all »

“There are different signs that this is not stopping. I don’t think that anger and frustration and those feelings can go away. I hope they don’t. The attention and support for the victims needs to be continued, more than people worried about these abusers and what’s next for them, how are they going to move on — shut up. You know what? If any of these people come back, I would say, “I can’t wait to see who is actually going to support them.” That is going to be the glaring horror. Who is going to be, like, “This is a pressing issue, and we need to get them back?” If a janitor was so great at cleaning the building but also tended to masturbate in front of people, would the people at that building be like, “Yes, he masturbated, but I’ve never seen anyone clean so thoroughly, and I was just wondering when he’s going to get his job back, he’s so good at it.” No, it would be, “That’s not acceptable.” It’s fame and power that people are blinded by.”
~ Tig Notaro in the New York Times

“It’s never been easy. I’ve always been one of the scavenger dogs of film financing, picking up money here and there. I’ve been doing that all my life. This was one was relatively easy because certain costs have gone down so much. I made this film in 20 days whereas 30 years ago, it would have been made in 42.”
~ Paul Schrader