By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

141 Original Scores Tune Up For Oscar

 141 ORIGINAL SCORES IN 2017 OSCAR RACE

LOS ANGELES, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced that 141 scores from eligible feature-length motion pictures released in 2017 are in contention for nominations in the Original Score category for the 90th Academy Awards.

The eligible scores along with their composers are listed below, in alphabetical order by film title:

“Alien: Covenant,” Jed Kurzel, composer
“All I See Is You,” Marc Streitenfeld, composer
“All the Money in the World,” Daniel Pemberton, composer
“Annabelle: Creation,” Benjamin Wallfisch, composer
“Band Aid,” Lucius, composer
“Battle of the Sexes,” Nicholas Britell, composer
“Baywatch,” Christopher Lennertz, composer
“Beauty and the Beast,” Alan Menken, composer
“The Big Sick,” Michael Andrews, composer
“Blade Runner 2049,” Benjamin Wallfisch and Hans Zimmer, composers
“The Book of Henry,” Michael Giacchino, composer
“Born in China,” Barnaby Taylor, composer
“The Boss Baby,” Hans Zimmer and Steve Mazzaro, composers
“Boston,” Jeff Beal, composer
“Brad’s Status,” Mark Mothersbaugh, composer
“Brawl in Cell Block 99,” Jeff Herriott and S. Craig Zahler, composers
“The Breadwinner,” Mychael Danna and Jeff Danna, composers
“Breathe,” Nitin Sawhney, composer
“Brigsby Bear,” David Wingo, composer
“Brimstone & Glory,” Dan Romer and Benh Zeitlin, composers
“Captain Underpants The First Epic Movie,” Theodore Shapiro, composer
“Cars 3,” Randy Newman, composer
“The Circle,” Danny Elfman, composer
“Coco,” Michael Giacchino, composer
“Cries from Syria,” Martin Tillman, composer
“A Cure for Wellness,” Benjamin Wallfisch, composer
“Darkest Hour,” Dario Marianelli, composer
“Despicable Me 3,” Heitor Pereira, composer
“The Disaster Artist,” Dave Porter, composer
“A Dog’s Purpose,” Rachel Portman, composer
“Downsizing,” Rolfe Kent, composer
“Drawing Home,” Ben Holiday, composer
“Dunkirk,” Hans Zimmer, composer
“Earth: One Amazing Day,” Alex Heffes, composer
“A Fantastic Woman,” Matthew Herbert, composer
“The Fate of the Furious,” Brian Tyler, composer
“Father Figures,” Rob Simonsen, composer
“Ferdinand,” John Powell, composer
“Fifty Shades Darker,” Danny Elfman, composer
“Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,” J. Ralph, composer
“First They Killed My Father,” Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders, composers
“Get Out,” Michael Abels, composer
“A Ghost Story,” Daniel Hart, composer
“Gifted,” Rob Simonsen, composer
“The Glass Castle,” Joel P. West, composer
“Going in Style,” Rob Simonsen, composer
“Good Time,” Daniel Lopatin, composer
“Goodbye Christopher Robin,” Carter Burwell, composer
“Gook,” Roger Suen, composer
“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” Tyler Bates, composer
“The Hitman’s Bodyguard,” Atli Ӧrvarsson, composer
“Hostiles,” Max Richter, composer
“Human Flow,” Karsten Fundal, composer
“An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power,” Jeff Beal, composer
“It,” Benjamin Wallfisch, composer
“Jane,” Philip Glass, composer
“Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle,” Henry Jackman, composer
“Justice League,” Danny Elfman, composer
“Kepler’s Dream,” Patrick Neil Doyle, composer
“King Arthur: Legend of the Sword,” Daniel Pemberton, composer
“Kingsman: The Golden Circle,” Henry Jackman and Matthew Margeson, composers
“Kong: Skull Island,” Henry Jackman, composer
“LA 92,” Danny Bensi and Saunder Jurriaans, composers
“LBJ,” Marc Shaiman, composer
“Lady Bird,” Jon Brion, composer
“Lake of Fire,” Qutub-E-Kripa, composer
“Last Flag Flying,” Graham Reynolds, composer
“The Lego Batman Movie,” Lorne Balfe, composer
“The Lego Ninjago Movie,” Mark Mothersbaugh, composer
“The Leisure Seeker,” Carlo Virzì, composer
“Let It Fall,” Mark Isham, composer
“Life,” Jon Ekstrand, composer
“Logan,” Marco Beltrami, composer
“The Lost City of Z,” Christopher Spelman, composer
“Loveless,” Evgueni Galperine and Sacha Galperine, composers
“Loving Vincent,” Clint Mansell, composer
“The Man Who Invented Christmas,” Mychael Danna, composer
“Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House,” Daniel Pemberton, composer
“Marshall,” Marcus Miller, composer
“Mary and the Witch’s Flower,” Takatsugu Muramatsu, composer
“Maudie,” Michael Timmins, composer
“Molly’s Game,” Daniel Pemberton, composer
“Moomins and the Winter Wonderland,” Łukasz Targosz, composer
“The Mountain between Us,” Ramin Djawadi, composer
“Mudbound,” Tamar-kali, composer
“The Mummy,” Brian Tyler, composer
“Murder on the Orient Express,” Patrick Doyle, composer
“My Cousin Rachel,” Rael Jones, composer
“Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer,” Jun Miyake, composer
“Okja,” Jaeil Jung, composer
“Oklahoma City,” David Cieri, composer
“The Only Living Boy in New York,” Rob Simonsen, composer
“Only the Brave,” Joseph Trapanese, composer
“Our Souls at Night,” Elliot Goldenthal, composer
“Paris Can Wait,” Laura Karpman, composer
“Patti Cake$,” Geremy Jasper and Jason Binnick, composers
“Phantom Thread,” Jonny Greenwood, composer
“The Pirates of Somalia,” Andrew Feltenstein and John Nau, composers
“Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,” Geoff Zanelli, composer
“The Post,” John Williams, composer
“Professor Marston and the Wonder Women,” Tom Howe, composer
“The Promise,” Gabriel Yared, composer
“Pulimurugan,” Gopi Sundar, composer
“Raw,” Jim Williams, composer
“Roman J. Israel, Esq.,” James Newton Howard, composer
“Saban’s Power Rangers,” Brian Tyler, composer
“Same Kind of Different as Me,” John Paesano, composer
“The Second Coming of Christ,” Navid Hejazi, Ramin Kousha and Silvia Leonetti, composers
“Served Like a Girl,” Michael A. Levine, composer
“The Shack,” Aaron Zigman, composer
“The Shape of Water,” Alexandre Desplat, composer
“Slipaway,” Tao Liu, composer
“Smurfs: The Lost Village,” Christopher Lennertz, composer
“Spider-Man: Homecoming,” Michael Giacchino, composer
“Split,” West Dylan Thordson, composer
“The Star,” John Paesano, composer
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” John Williams, composer
“Step,” Laura Karpman and Raphael Saadiq, composers
“Stronger,” Michael Brook, composer
“Suburbicon,” Alexandre Desplat, composer
“Swing Away,” Tao Zervas, composer
“Thank You for Your Service,” Thomas Newman, composer
“Their Finest,” Rachel Portman, composer
“Thelma,” Ola Fløttum, composer
“Thor: Ragnarok,” Mark Mothersbaugh, composer
“Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Carter Burwell, composer
“Tickling Giants,” Paul Tyan, composer
“Tommy’s Honour,” Christian Henson, composer
“Trafficked,” David Das, composer
“Transformers: The Last Knight,” Steve Jablonsky, composer
“XXX: Return of Xander Cage,” Brian Tyler and Robert Lydecker, composers
“Victoria & Abdul,” Thomas Newman, composer
“Voice from the Stone,” Michael Wandmacher, composer
“Wakefield,” Aaron Zigman, composer
“War for the Planet of the Apes,” Michael Giacchino, composer
“Wilson,” Jon Brion, composer
“Wind River,” Nick Cave and Warren Ellis, composers
“Wonder,” Marcelo Zarvos, composer
“Wonder Woman,” Rupert Gregson-Williams, composer
“Wonderstruck,” Carter Burwell, composer
“Year by the Sea,” Alexander Janko, composer

A Reminder List of works submitted in the Original Score category will be made available with a nominations ballot to all members of the Music Branch, who shall vote in the order of their preference for not more than five achievements.  The five achievements receiving the highest number of votes will become the nominations for final voting for the award.

To be eligible, the original score must be a substantial body of music that serves as original dramatic underscoring, and must be written specifically for the motion picture by the submitting composer.  Scores diluted by the use of preexisting music, diminished in impact by the predominant use of songs or any music not composed specifically for the film by the submitting composer, or assembled from the music of more than one composer shall not be eligible.

Nominations for the 90th Academy Awards will be announced on Tuesday, January 23, 2018.

The 90th Oscars® will be held on Sunday, March 4, 2018, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center® in Hollywood, and will be televised live on the ABC Television Network at 6:30 p.m. ET/3:30 p.m. PT. The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

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ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 8,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which is under construction in Los Angeles.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
www.oscars.org
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