By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Critics’ Choice Lifetime Achievement Award to Errol Morris

[pr] DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKER ERROL MORRIS TO RECEIVE THE LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD AT THE CRITICS’ CHOICE DOCUMENTARY AWARDS

The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) and the Broadcast Television Journalists Association (BTJA) have announced Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker Errol Morris as the recipient of the Critics’ Choice Lifetime Achievement Award. Morris will receive his award at the second annual Critics’ Choice Documentary Awards gala event, set to take place on Thursday, November 2, 2017 at BRIC in Brooklyn, New York, hosted by Penn Jillette.

Journalist and author Kathryn Schulz will present the Critics’ Choice Lifetime Achievement Award to Morris. Damien Echols will present the previously announced Critics’ Choice Impact Award to filmmaker Joe Berlinger. Echols is one of the West Memphis Three, the group which is the subject of Berlinger’s Paradise Lost documentary trilogy. Additional award presenters include: Clive Davis, Matt Dillon, Gilbert Gottfried, Barbara Kopple, Lawrence O’Donnell, Linda Perry, and Fisher Stevens, Diane Warren, among others.

Films directed by Errol Morris have won many awards, including an Oscar for The Fog of War, the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival for A Brief History of Time, the Silver Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival for Standard Operating Procedure, and the Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for The Thin Blue Line. His films have been honored by the National Society of Film Critics and the National Board of Review. Morris’ work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art. Roger Ebert, a champion of Morris’ work, called his first film, Gates of Heaven (1978), one of the ten best films of all time.

 

Netflix will release Morris’ newest film, Wormwood, as a six-part event on the streaming site on December 15, 2017. The director has also prepared a non-episodic theatrical version with a single intermission. Morris is the author of two New York Times best sellers, Believing is Seeing and A Wilderness of Error, and is a regular contributor to The New York Times opinion pages and Op-Docs series.

 

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