By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Telluride Fest Looks Back At 44

Telluride, CO, September 11, 2017 – Telluride Film Festival (September 1-4, 2017), presented by the National Film Preserve, reflects upon a spectacular four-day celebration of diverse programming and special guests attended by more than 4,000 movie lovers.

This was my 44th Telluride Film Festival,” remarked co-founder and artistic director Tom Luddy. “I feel it was one of our strongest festivals. The organization, the content and balance of the program, the weather and vibes in the street made for a weekend that was really special. The films were terrific and the feedback from the filmmakers and pass holders was very satisfying.”

Telluride Film Festival curated over 60 programs representing twenty-six countries including thirty new feature films in its main program; six film revivals selected by the extraordinary and eloquent Guest Director Joshua Oppenheimer; seven Backlot programs; four revival programs; over fifteen shorts and/or student films, and hosted nine seminars and conversations between festival guests.

Luddy notes, “The Panels and Conversations were exceptional this year. Elks Park was packed for the Real Life Wonder Women panel with Angelina Jolie, Billie Jean King, Natalie Portman and Alice Waters; The Conversation between Francis Ford Coppola, Ken Burns and Lynn Novick on Vietnam was extraordinary; Bob Baer with Errol Morris and Eric Olson was another ‘only in Telluride’ event.

I don’t want to single out any one film from our selection of new films – I loved them all – but I will single out The Cotton Club Encore, Coppola’s new restoration featuring more than 25 minutes of amazing footage, mostly involving song and dance sequences that had been cut from the original film. The standing ovation for Francis from the sold out audiences moved me to tears. In this version, the film takes its place beside The Godfather, The Godfather: Part II, The Conversation, and Apocalypse Now as one of Coppola’s greatest films.”

44th Telluride Film Festival guests and program participants include: Bob Baer, Kantemir Balagov, Christian Bale, Jamie Bell, Ken Burns, Christian Camargo, Jon Bang Carlsen, Hong Chau, Scott Cooper, Francis Ford Coppola, Jonathan Dayton, Guillermo del Toro, Ziad Doueiri, Valerie Faris, Travis Fimmel, Greta Gerwig, Rezo Gigineishvili, Al Gore, Andrew Haigh, Sherwan Haji, Ethan Hawke, Todd Haynes, Werner Herzog, Maurice Hines, Zachary Hines, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Brady Jandreau, Lilly Jandreau, Tim Jandreau, Barry Jenkins, Richard Jenkins, Angelina Jolie, JR, Billie Jean King, Dorota Kobiela, Irakli Kvirikadze, Ed Lachman, Jacob LaMendola, Sebastián Lelio, Tracy Letts, Camilla Magid, Ben Mendelsohn, Anthony McCarten, Paul McGuigan, Laurie Metcalf,  Rebecca Miller, Mont Alto Orchestra, Errol Morris, Kimhak Mun, Lynn Novick, Gary Oldman, Eric Olson, Goran Hugo Olsson, Rithy Panh, Alexander Payne, Nigel Pemberton, Rosamund Pike, Natalie Portman, Christopher Quinn, Mohammad Rasoulof, Pierre Rissient,  Céline Ruivo, Sreymoch Sareum, Katriel Schory, Paul Schrader, Barbet Schroeder, Lane Scott, Peter Sellars, Millicent Simmonds, Donald Sosin, Elaine McMillion Sheldon, Elisabeth Shue, Emma Stone, Wes Studi, Peter Turner, Paolo Loung Ung, Cherchi Usai, Rosalie Varda, Daniela Vega, Willy Vlautin, Lisa Immordino Vreeland, Anthony Wall, Alice Waters,  Michael Weatherly, Ai Weiwei, Hugh Welchman, Joe Wright, Chloé Zhao, Tony Zierra, Andrey Zvyagintsev

“This year will be hard to top, but we are already looking toward the 45th Festival with anticipation and vigor,” said Luddy. “Every year brings us many new treasures to share with the Telluride family. I think we may outdo ourselves yet again.”

A complete list of 44th Telluride Film Festival films and events is available at www.telluridefilmfestival.org

About Telluride Film Festival

The prestigious Telluride Film Festival ranks among the world’s best film festivals and is an annual gathering for film industry insiders, cinema enthusiasts, filmmakers and critics. TFF is considered a major launching ground for the fall season’s most talked-about films. Founded in 1974, Telluride Film Festival, presented in the beautiful mountain town of Telluride, Colorado, is a four-day international educational event celebrating the art of film. Telluride Film Festival’s long-standing commitment is to join filmmakers and film connoisseurs together to experience great cinema. The exciting schedule, kept secret until just before Opening Day, consists of over three dozen filmmakers presenting their newest works, special Guest Director programs, major Tributes to guest artists, special events and remarkable treasures from the past. Telluride Film Festival is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit educational program. Festival headquarters are in Berkeley, CA.

About Our Sponsors

We are extremely proud of our committed relationships, each of which are aligned with a unique feature of the festival and contribute to enhancing the festival experience, including Signature Sponsors: Turner Classic Movies, EY and Meyer Sound; Major Sponsors: Amazon Studios, FilmStruck, ARRI, Participant Media, Universal Studios, Delta Airlines, Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television; Festival Sponsors: Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, Criterion Collection, Dolby, DELL, Boston Light and Sound; General Sponsors: Telluride Ski & Golf Resort, Telluride Mountain Village Owners Associated, National Endowment for the Arts, Colorado Office of Film, Television & Media; our wonderful Hospitality Partners: Telluride Alpine Lodging, The London West Hollywood, New Sheridan Hotel, The Chatwal New York; and Festival Auto Partner: Tesla; plus Colorado Creative Industries, Fotokem, Spectrum, and the Town of Telluride, among others.

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2 Responses to “Telluride Fest Looks Back At 44”

  1. Jose Angel Cruz says:

    Do you know if The Cotton Club Encore will be released?

  2. Ray Pride says:

    Unconfirmed rumor has it won’t be seen, that it’s being blocked in any form of distribution by MGM’s Gary Barber.

Quote Unquotesee all »

The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda