By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Louis C. K.’s Hot-Button Clandestinely-Produced Woody Allen Homage Gets November NY/LA Release

THE ORCHARD ANNOUNCES LOUIS C.K.’S “I LOVE YOU, DADDY”

TO OPEN THEATRICALLY NOVEMBER 17 IN NEW YORK AND LOS ANGELES

Comedy Stars Louis C.K., John Malkovich, Chloë Grace Moretz, Rose Byrne,

Edie Falco, Charlie Day, Pamela Adlon, Helen Hunt, and Ebonee Noel

Photo credit: Courtesy of The Orchard. Click here for artwork.

NEW YORK (September 27, 2017) – The Orchard announced today it will theatrically release Louis C.K.’s dark comedy I LOVE YOU, DADDY on Friday, November 17 in New York and Los Angeles, and then expand across North America on December 1st. The film stars Louis C.K., John Malkovich, Chloë Grace Moretz, Rose Byrne, Edie Falco, Charlie Day, Pamela Adlon, Helen Hunt, and Ebonee Noel.

I LOVE YOU, DADDY is a brazen and funny look at fascination with artists and scandal and being a father. Written and directed by Louis C.K. from a story by C.K. and Vernon Chatman, the 35mm black and white film was shot earlier this year and made its world premiere to critical acclaim and sold-out screenings this month at the Toronto International Film Festival. I LOVE YOU, DADDY is produced by Louis C.K., Vernon Chatman, John Skidmore, Dave Becky and Ryan Cunningham. www.ILoveYouDaddy.film

 

About The Orchard

The Orchard, celebrating 20 years in business, is a pioneering independent film, TV and music distribution company that operates in over 25 global markets. The company, founded as a music distributor in 1997, is a groundbreaking leader in the film and television distribution space, known for its innovative technology that provides filmmakers with up-to-the minute trending data and analytics on their projects. Upcoming releases include Super Dark Times, Foreign Film Oscar contenders Beats Per Minute and Thelma, Sundance Jury prize winner DinaThe Work, 11/8/16, Max Winkler’s Flower and Deniz Gamze Erguven’s Kings. The company’s film division has enjoyed such recent successes as the Academy Award-nominated documentaries Cartel Land and Life, Animated; Taika Waititi’s The Hunt for the Wilderpeople, Academy Award-winner Morgan Neville’s The Music of Strangers, Alex Lehmann’s Blue Jay, Antonio Campos’ Christine and Pablo Larrain’s critically acclaimed, Golden Globe-nominated Neruda, Oren Moverman’s The Dinner and Jeremiah Tower: The Last Magnificent. The company is currently in theaters with the Sundance documentary Trophy and just finished the theatrical run for The Hero, which has the third highest box office of any Sundance movie released this year. For more information on The Orchard, please visit www.theorchard.com.

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch