MCN Blogs
Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Harry Dean, Off To The Dan Tana’s In The Sunset Sky

Lucky Harry Dean Stanton

7 Responses to “Harry Dean, Off To The Dan Tana’s In The Sunset Sky”

  1. jspartisan says:

    There’s no other actor, ever, who could do what HDS did. He’s fucking irreplaceable, but it’s very cool that he went from 1954 to 2017. That’s some solid fucking awesome.

  2. Ray Pride says:

    Lucky opens later this month. It’s as Harry Dean as it gets.

  3. PTA Fluffer says:

    Now his perf in Lucky seems destined for a posthumous Oscar nom.

  4. Ray Pride says:

    Considering the first word he speaks in the movie…

  5. LBB says:

    There were none like him and there will never be. Improved everything he was in just by showing up and demonstrated the best of his skills in every moment. We were lucky to live in his times.

  6. Sideshow Bill says:

    I’m gutted. I thought he would just live forever. Like LBB says above he automatically improved everything he was in. He has I think 3 scenes in Carpenter’s Christine but they elevate the whole thing. He was so good, so unique. There was always so much going on behind his eyes. This really hurts. RIP HDS.

  7. LBB says:

    I’d honestly forgotten he was in CHRISTINE, Sideshow Bill. I imagine I’ve forgotten more films he was in than I remember, which will make the coming months (years?) a fresh sadness as we remember something or come across him in something we watch again in a long time. I’ve known his name and face since ALIEN (which I wasn’t allowed to see, so I pored over film books in the library and absorbed it as much as possible), and his appearances so often were less “hey, it’s Harry Dean Stanton!” and more “okay, at least this movie has Harry Dean Stanton.” He was a reassuring presence, someone who made you feel so comfortable and pleased in those moments. Losing him is like the planet losing a basic element. We’ll go on but certain critical combinations will be impossible.

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh

 

“I have made few films in a way. I never made action films. I never made science fiction films. I never made, really, very complicated settings, because I had modest ambitions. I knew they would never trust me to have the budget to do something different, so my mind is more focused on things I know. So they were always mental adventures I wanted to approach and share. Working for cinema with no – not only no money, but also no ambition for money. I was happy and proud [to receive the honorary Oscar] because of that, that [the Academy] could understand what kind of work I have done over 60 years. I stayed faithful to the ideal of sharing emotion, impressions, and mostly because I have so much empathy for other people that I approach people who are not really spoken about. I have 65 years of work in my bag, and when I put the bag down, what comes out? It’s really the desire of finding links and relationships with different kinds of people. I never made a film about the bourgeoisie, about rich people. about nobility. My choices have been to show people that are, in a way, more common and see that each of them has something special and interesting, rare and beautiful. It’s my natural way of looking at people. I didn’t fight my instincts. And maybe that has been appreciated in the famous circle of Hollywood.“

Agnes Varda