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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Harry Dean, Off To The Dan Tana’s In The Sunset Sky

Lucky Harry Dean Stanton

7 Responses to “Harry Dean, Off To The Dan Tana’s In The Sunset Sky”

  1. jspartisan says:

    There’s no other actor, ever, who could do what HDS did. He’s fucking irreplaceable, but it’s very cool that he went from 1954 to 2017. That’s some solid fucking awesome.

  2. Ray Pride says:

    Lucky opens later this month. It’s as Harry Dean as it gets.

  3. PTA Fluffer says:

    Now his perf in Lucky seems destined for a posthumous Oscar nom.

  4. Ray Pride says:

    Considering the first word he speaks in the movie…

  5. LBB says:

    There were none like him and there will never be. Improved everything he was in just by showing up and demonstrated the best of his skills in every moment. We were lucky to live in his times.

  6. Sideshow Bill says:

    I’m gutted. I thought he would just live forever. Like LBB says above he automatically improved everything he was in. He has I think 3 scenes in Carpenter’s Christine but they elevate the whole thing. He was so good, so unique. There was always so much going on behind his eyes. This really hurts. RIP HDS.

  7. LBB says:

    I’d honestly forgotten he was in CHRISTINE, Sideshow Bill. I imagine I’ve forgotten more films he was in than I remember, which will make the coming months (years?) a fresh sadness as we remember something or come across him in something we watch again in a long time. I’ve known his name and face since ALIEN (which I wasn’t allowed to see, so I pored over film books in the library and absorbed it as much as possible), and his appearances so often were less “hey, it’s Harry Dean Stanton!” and more “okay, at least this movie has Harry Dean Stanton.” He was a reassuring presence, someone who made you feel so comfortable and pleased in those moments. Losing him is like the planet losing a basic element. We’ll go on but certain critical combinations will be impossible.

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“That’s an artifact of just what a strange animal it was. They didn’t know, none of us really knew what to call it, or how to classify it. But aside from the confusion about the classification, the actual what we were going to shoot — the length of each of the stories, all of which vary — there was never anything that we were considering doing any differently. There were never any more stories and they were always intended to be seen as a group.”
~ Joel Coen on The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs at NYFF press conference

“I find it hard to believe that it’s pure machismo. It’s too simple of a thought. I don’t know what the reason could be. I also think that it makes sense that, as time goes by, filmmaking should become more of a women-dominated activity. To me, of course, I feel like it’s going to happen. It seems to me that, especially for a certain cinema with its own language, you need to take a lot of risks. And women receive a type of education that allows much more for failure than the type men receive. It is easier for a woman to take risks than for a man. But I’ll also tell you another thing, women need to learn to master the tools, to solve technical problems, to control unscripted situations. There is also a totally macho attitude that many women have internalized in terms of not solving certain technical problems on their own. That also makes them a little less capable… Female DoPs often think that their technical area is limited to pen and paper. And that’s wrong. You need to learn a lot of things to be a good DoP. For me, machismo breeds both a masculine education and a nefarious feminine education. Macho culture engenders an education for men and another for women. The education for men we already know, and is easily criticized. And the nefarious education that machismo has for women is exemplified by women who ultimately ignore how to use tools, who—when something breaks, or when it gets dark—are rendered useless and get desperate. Women who do not even know how to build a fire. They don’t know how to deal with these situations, because these were activities that have traditionally been delegated to men. That can make us… not very… prone to achieve certain things. For me, we first have to fight against our own education, and also against an external model of erasure that has rendered women less capable than men in certain fields.”
Lucrecia Martel