By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Lalo Schifrin Gets An 85th Birthday Concert

Musicians at Play, Musicians Fund Los Angeles, in association with Varese Sarabande present Mission: Impossible’ Composer Lalo Schifrin’s 85th Birthday Concert October 7 at the Alex Theater in Glendale, CA

Legendary composer, musician, conductor and six-time Oscar nominee Lalo Schifrin (MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE) will celebrate his 85th birthday with a special concert in his honor Oct. 7 at the Alex, 216 North Brand Boulevard in Glendale.  Musicians at Play Foundation and AFM Local 47’s Music Fund of Los Angeles are presenting the event in association with Varese Sarabande. Proceeds from the concert benefit music education in schools and assist professional musicians in crisis.  The concert will feature special guests including Oscar winning Composer Michael Giacchino (UP) and Oscar-winning songwriters Alan and Marilyn Bergman (“Windmills of Your Mind,” “The Way We Were”) and several surprises. Tickets available through (818) 243-ALEX (2539) or visit www.alextheatre.org

The concert will be conducted by Chris Walden and feature an all-star big band performing many of Schifrin’s best-known works. The event is hosted by Robert Townson of Varese Sarabande. “Lalo is one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time, and when it comes to film music he has always been the epitome of cool at the movies,” describes Townson.

Local 47 President John Acosta explains the significance of the concert, “This is the inaugural concert by the AFM and Local 47 to celebrate a composer and their legacy. Lalo has been a member of the union for nearly 50 years since coming to the U.S. Thousands of AFM members have worked with him and there is a real connection with the music community. Lalo Schifrin is an inspiration and we are thrilled to honor him.”

Lalo Schifrin has scored over 100 films, including BULLIT, COOL HAND LUKE, DIRTY HARRY, THE CINCINNATI KID and the COMPETITION, and he is best known for his MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE theme.  Originally from Buenos Aires, Argentina, Schifrin began studying piano with at the age of 6. At 20, he won a scholarship to study music at the Paris Conservatory.  After moving to the U.S., Schifrin performed and arranged music for both Dizzy Gillespie and Xavier Cugat before composing for film and television.

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