By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Michael Moore’s Traverse City Film Fest Will Close With Detroit

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
TRAVERSE CITY FILM FESTIVAL 2017 WILL CLOSE WITH KATHRYN BIGELOW’S “DETROIT”
TRAVERSE CITY, MI July 5, 2017 — The 13th annual Traverse City Film Festival (TCFF) is proud to announce as its Closing Night Film “Detroit,” the highly anticipated new film by Academy Award-winning director Kathryn Bigelow, one of the greatest directors working today. Following the film’s July 25 premiere at the Fox Theater in Detroit, the Traverse City Film Festival (July 25-30, 2017) will screen the film in its historic movie palace, the State Theatre, at 6 pm on July 30.
“This captivating, vital film resonates strongly today, 50 years after the events took place,” said Academy Award-winning director Michael Moore, the festival’s founder, president and programmer. “We aim to bring great movies that can move, inspire, and change audiences. There could be no better way to close this year’s festival than with ‘Detroit.'”
The film focuses on the Algiers Motel killings, a brutal incident that has become synonymous with the systemic racism that helped spark the 1967 Detroit uprising. Piecing together the horrifying, true events of that evening, when a group of teenagers ducked into the Algiers to avoid the chaos outside, and police later stormed the building, Bigelow has delivered another riveting powerhouse of a film.
The new film from Bigelow and screenwriter and frequent collaborator Mark Boal stars John Boyega (“Star Wars: The Force Awakens”), Will Poulter (“The Revenant”), Jason Mitchell (“Straight Outta Compton”), Hannah Murray (HBO’s “Game of Thrones”), John Krasinski (NBC’s “The Office”) and Anthony Mackie (“Captain American: Civil War”) and Detroit native Algee Smith.
Tickets for the Traverse City Film Festival go on sale for Friends of the Film Festival on Sunday, July 9 at the Main Box Office (121 E. Front St.) at 10 am and online at 6 pm at tcff.org. Public ticketing begins July 15.
ABOUT THE TRAVERSE CITY FILM FESTIVAL
The Traverse City Film Festival is a charitable, educational, nonprofit organization committed helping save one of America’s few indigenous art forms: the cinema. The festival brings films and filmmakers from around the world to northern Michigan for the annual film festival in late July. The festival was founded by Academy Award-winning director Michael Moore who makes his home in Traverse City, programs and runs the festival, and serves as president of the board of directors. Other board members are filmmakers Rod Birleson (producer, “Where to Invade Next”), Larry Charles (director, “Borat”), Mark Cousins (director, “The Story of Film: An Odyssey”), Jeff Daniels (actor, “The Newsroom”), Terry George (director, “Hotel Rwanda”), Christine Lahti (actor, “Running on Empty”), Tia Lessin (director, “Trouble the Water”), and former Walt Disney Co. marketing executive Penny Milliken, Tom Morello (musician, Rage Against the Machine), and photographer John Robert Williams.

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“The sad and painful truth is that pretty much everyone in this town knew who Harvey was. I have had long talks with my most liberal friends. Did we know he was a rapist? We didn’t. But did we know that for decades he has been offering actresses big careers in exchange for sexual favors? Yes, we did — and make no mistake, that is its own kind of rape. And did we all — or did any of us — refuse to do business with him on moral grounds? No. We ALL STAYED IN BUSINESS WITH HIM. I have never done business with Harvey but I can tell you with certainty that I would have — because I was recently approached by a film festival he sponsors. They asked me to submit my short film for their consideration and I did it without thinking twice. I am a dyed-in-the-wool feminist and a vocal one at that. So why didn’t I think twice? Because this entire town is built on the ugly principals that Harvey takes to an horrific extreme. If I didn’t work with people whose behavior I find reprehensible, I wouldn’t have a career.”
~ Showrunner Krista Vernoff

From AMPAS president John Bailey:

Dear Fellow Academy Members,

Danish director Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film “The Passion of Joan of Arc” is not only one of the visual landmarks of the silent era, but is a deeply disturbing portrait of a young woman’s persecution in the face of the male judges and priests of the ruling order. The actress Maria Falconetti gave one of the most profoundly affecting performances in the history of cinema as the Maid of Orleans.

Since the decision of the Academy’s Board of Governors on Saturday October 14 to expel producer Harvey Weinstein from its membership, I have been haunted not only by the recurring image of Falconetti and the sad arc of her career (dying in Argentina in 1946, reputedly from a crash diet) but of Joan’s refusal to submit to an auto de fe recantation of her beliefs.

Recent public testimonies by some of filmdom’s most recognized women regarding sexual intimidation, predation, and physical force is, clearly, a turning point in the film industry—and hopefully in our country, where what happens in the world of movies becomes a marker of societal Zeitgeist. Their decision to stand up against a powerful, abusive male not only parallels the cinema courage of Falconetti’s Joan but gives all women courage to speak up.

After Saturday’s Board of Governors meeting, the Academy issued a passionately worded statement, expressing not only our concern about harassment in the film industry, but our intention to be a strong voice in changing the culture of sexual exploitation in the movie business, already common well before the founding of the Academy 90 years ago. It is up to all of us Academy members to more clearly define for ourselves the parameters of proper conduct, of sexual equality, and respect for our fellow artists throughout our industry. The Academy cannot, and will not, be an inquisitorial court, but we can be part of a larger initiative to define standards of behavior, and to support the vulnerable women and men who may be at personal and career risk because of violations of ethical standards by their peers.

Yours,
John