By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Michael Moore’s Traverse City Film Fest Will Close With Detroit

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
TRAVERSE CITY FILM FESTIVAL 2017 WILL CLOSE WITH KATHRYN BIGELOW’S “DETROIT”
TRAVERSE CITY, MI July 5, 2017 — The 13th annual Traverse City Film Festival (TCFF) is proud to announce as its Closing Night Film “Detroit,” the highly anticipated new film by Academy Award-winning director Kathryn Bigelow, one of the greatest directors working today. Following the film’s July 25 premiere at the Fox Theater in Detroit, the Traverse City Film Festival (July 25-30, 2017) will screen the film in its historic movie palace, the State Theatre, at 6 pm on July 30.
“This captivating, vital film resonates strongly today, 50 years after the events took place,” said Academy Award-winning director Michael Moore, the festival’s founder, president and programmer. “We aim to bring great movies that can move, inspire, and change audiences. There could be no better way to close this year’s festival than with ‘Detroit.'”
The film focuses on the Algiers Motel killings, a brutal incident that has become synonymous with the systemic racism that helped spark the 1967 Detroit uprising. Piecing together the horrifying, true events of that evening, when a group of teenagers ducked into the Algiers to avoid the chaos outside, and police later stormed the building, Bigelow has delivered another riveting powerhouse of a film.
The new film from Bigelow and screenwriter and frequent collaborator Mark Boal stars John Boyega (“Star Wars: The Force Awakens”), Will Poulter (“The Revenant”), Jason Mitchell (“Straight Outta Compton”), Hannah Murray (HBO’s “Game of Thrones”), John Krasinski (NBC’s “The Office”) and Anthony Mackie (“Captain American: Civil War”) and Detroit native Algee Smith.
Tickets for the Traverse City Film Festival go on sale for Friends of the Film Festival on Sunday, July 9 at the Main Box Office (121 E. Front St.) at 10 am and online at 6 pm at tcff.org. Public ticketing begins July 15.
ABOUT THE TRAVERSE CITY FILM FESTIVAL
The Traverse City Film Festival is a charitable, educational, nonprofit organization committed helping save one of America’s few indigenous art forms: the cinema. The festival brings films and filmmakers from around the world to northern Michigan for the annual film festival in late July. The festival was founded by Academy Award-winning director Michael Moore who makes his home in Traverse City, programs and runs the festival, and serves as president of the board of directors. Other board members are filmmakers Rod Birleson (producer, “Where to Invade Next”), Larry Charles (director, “Borat”), Mark Cousins (director, “The Story of Film: An Odyssey”), Jeff Daniels (actor, “The Newsroom”), Terry George (director, “Hotel Rwanda”), Christine Lahti (actor, “Running on Empty”), Tia Lessin (director, “Trouble the Water”), and former Walt Disney Co. marketing executive Penny Milliken, Tom Morello (musician, Rage Against the Machine), and photographer John Robert Williams.

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch