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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

BYOFear: RIP George A. Romero

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(Image © Ray Pride.)
DAY OF THE DEAD

5 Responses to “BYOFear: RIP George A. Romero”

  1. Sideshow Bill says:

    Dawn of the Dead is one of my top 5 favorite films of all time. I remember buying it on VHS at Hills department store in my hometown town of Jamestown NY. I was maybe 15. Nobody checked my age or anything. It rocked my world. Still does. Romero gone. Craven gone. Carpenter is my favorite director of all time and I worry for him. This is sad. Getting old has its perks but losing loved ones isn’t one of them. Wasn’t he supposed to get a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame this year?

  2. jspartisan says:

    I love this man’s work. It means the world to me, and always will. He made horror that was gory as hell, but also had a messages behind it. There was always some meaning. I’m glad he got to make Land, and that I got to see it with my brother. Who also, loves Romero, and this totally fucking bums us out. I hope some version of Empire of the Dead sees the air, because it truly does add to his previous work. RIP, sir.

  3. Ray Pride says:

    A few fine interviews linked on the front page. I’ll add more pieces in the next couple days. David Hudson’s aggregating stuff at Criterion Current Daily, too.

  4. LynchVanSant says:

    My local library showed Night of The Living Dead one October afternoon when I was 10 or 11. It hadn’t been on television yet in 1977. It’s my favorite of his and it’s a shame that the rights to it were in such disarray that he didn’t get rewarded as greatly as he should have been for its success. His Dead trilogy is the greatest horror trilogy of all time, each a success. Day of the Dead is underrated. Horror video games such as Half-Life were greatly influenced by it with its mix of military and medical experiments.

  5. LBB says:

    He made his fame on movies about the rising tide of living dead and man’s dwindling hopes of survival and still he never let his films devolve into nihilism. He will be missed in so many ways and we were lucky to have him.

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