MCN Blogs
Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

BYOFear: RIP George A. Romero

16092009365_d9edb4fbd8_o
(Image © Ray Pride.)
DAY OF THE DEAD

5 Responses to “BYOFear: RIP George A. Romero”

  1. Sideshow Bill says:

    Dawn of the Dead is one of my top 5 favorite films of all time. I remember buying it on VHS at Hills department store in my hometown town of Jamestown NY. I was maybe 15. Nobody checked my age or anything. It rocked my world. Still does. Romero gone. Craven gone. Carpenter is my favorite director of all time and I worry for him. This is sad. Getting old has its perks but losing loved ones isn’t one of them. Wasn’t he supposed to get a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame this year?

  2. jspartisan says:

    I love this man’s work. It means the world to me, and always will. He made horror that was gory as hell, but also had a messages behind it. There was always some meaning. I’m glad he got to make Land, and that I got to see it with my brother. Who also, loves Romero, and this totally fucking bums us out. I hope some version of Empire of the Dead sees the air, because it truly does add to his previous work. RIP, sir.

  3. Ray Pride says:

    A few fine interviews linked on the front page. I’ll add more pieces in the next couple days. David Hudson’s aggregating stuff at Criterion Current Daily, too.

  4. LynchVanSant says:

    My local library showed Night of The Living Dead one October afternoon when I was 10 or 11. It hadn’t been on television yet in 1977. It’s my favorite of his and it’s a shame that the rights to it were in such disarray that he didn’t get rewarded as greatly as he should have been for its success. His Dead trilogy is the greatest horror trilogy of all time, each a success. Day of the Dead is underrated. Horror video games such as Half-Life were greatly influenced by it with its mix of military and medical experiments.

  5. LBB says:

    He made his fame on movies about the rising tide of living dead and man’s dwindling hopes of survival and still he never let his films devolve into nihilism. He will be missed in so many ways and we were lucky to have him.

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
2. Family (cartoon like features)
3. Horror (teen-driven), and
4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

There are isolated pockets like black cinema, romcom, girl’s-night-out, seniors, teen gross-outs, but it’s primarily those four. Everything else is TV. Now I have to go back to episode five of ‘Looming Tower.'”
~ Paul Schrader

“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch