By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Annapurna Pictures Will Be Released By Fox Home Entertainment

[PR]  Kathryn Bigelow’s DETROIT to be First Film Released Under New Agreement

Annapurna and Twentieth Century Fox Film announced a multi-year home entertainment deal. Under the terms of the new partnership, Fox will service the U.S. home entertainment rights for all Annapurna-produced pictures across physical, Digital HD and TVOD platforms.

Kathryn Bigelow’s DETROIT will be the first film released under the agreement. The crime thriller set against the backdrop of the 1967 Detroit Rebellion is set for theatrical release on August 4, 2017.

“We are very excited to partner with Twentieth Century Fox Film to extend the reach of our films beyond the in-theater experience,” said Erik Lomis, President of Distribution, Annapurna. “We are confident that our films are in the best possible hands, and we look forward to a strong collaboration to bring them to market.”

Added Mary McLaren, Worldwide Chief Operating Officer, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, “Annapurna is taking their approach to creating critically and commercially acclaimed films to the next level, and we are excited to partner with them to deliver these powerful stories to broader audiences across the United States.”

The new deal continues to grow Annapurna’s distribution operation, which has in recent months announced international distribution partnerships with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), eOne, Longride, Mars Distribution, and Eagle Pictures/Leone Film Group.

Twentieth Century Fox Film also expands its Home Entertainment footprint, which already includes the studios’ own theatrical releases, as well as that of MGM, DreamWorks Animation, eOne, EuropaCorp, Lucasfilm, MGM, Pathe and Warner Brothers. Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment has offices in 16 countries worldwide, giving consumers access to Fox content in more than 100 countries.

ABOUT ANNAPURNA

Annapurna, founded by Megan Ellison, focuses on creating sophisticated, high-quality content that is critically and commercially conscious while still appealing to a diverse audience. By upholding Ellison’s vision to put filmmakers and artists first and preserve their authentic creative voices no matter the genre or medium, in 5 years, the company has garnered a total of 32 Academy Award nominations for their projects, including ZERO DARK THIRTY, JOY, THE MASTER, FOXCATCHER, and THE GRANDMASTER. Ellison is also one of only four honorees ever to receive two Best Picture nominations in the same year, with HER and AMERICAN HUSTLE, both earning nods in 2014. Currently, Annapurna is preparing for the release of Kathryn Bigelow’s DETROIT, its first distribution title, that will hit theaters on August 4, 2017. Other upcoming releases for 2017 include Angela Robinson’s PROFESSOR MARSTON AND THE WONDER WOMEN. The company is also in production on Paul Thomas Anderson’s untitled new period film starring Daniel Day-Lewis and is in pre-production on the film adaptation of Maria Semple’s WHERE’D YOU GO, BERNADETTE, to be directed by Richard Linklater.  Annapurna’s most recent projects include Mike Mills’ 20TH CENTURY WOMEN, which was nominated for two Golden Globes and earned Mills a Best Original Screenplay Academy Award nomination, as well as SAUSAGE PARTY, WIENER-DOG, and EVERYBODY WANTS SOME and THE BAD BATCH. Bigelow also directed and partnered with Annapurna on the animated short LAST DAYS, about illegal elephant poaching and the ivory trade.

ABOUT TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX HOME ENTERTAINMENT

Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, LLC (TCFHE) is a recognized global industry leader and a subsidiary of Twentieth Century Fox Film. TCFHE is the worldwide marketing, sales and distribution company for all Fox film and television programming, acquisitions and original productions as well as all third party distribution partners on DVD, Blu-ray, 4K Ultra HD, Digital HD, and VOD (video-on-demand). Each year TCFHE introduces hundreds of new and newly enhanced products, which it services to retail outlets and digital stores throughout the world.

# # #

Comments are closed.

Quote Unquotesee all »

“As these stories continue to break, in the weeks since women have said they were harassed and abused by Harvey Weinstein, which was not the birth of a movement but an easy and highly visible shorthand for decades of organizing against sexual harassment that preceded this moment, I hope to gain back my time, my work. Lately, though, I have noticed a drift in the discourse from violated rights to violated feelings: the swelled number of reporters on the beat, the burden on each woman’s story to concern a man “important” enough to report on, the detailed accounting of hotel robes and incriminating texts along with a careful description of what was grabbed, who exposed what, and how many times. What I remember most, from “my story” is how small the sex talk felt, almost dull. I did not feel hurt. I had no pain to confess in public. As more stories come out, I like to think that we would also believe a woman who said, for example, that the sight of the penis of the man who promised her work did not wound her, and that the loss she felt was not some loss of herself but of her time, energy, power.”
~ “The Unsexy Truth About Harassment,” by Melissa Gira Grant

“To say I knew exactly what I was doing at the outset — what’s that called? I think that would be a lie. Wormwood is something that was figured out as we went along. There was a kind of plan. My sales pitch to Netflix was, ‘I’m going to create the cinematic version of the everything bagel, except no raisins. I don’t like them in bagels. I think raisins are wrong, at least as far as bagels are concerned. But I told them I wanted to do something that combines straight drama, reenactments, archival research, various diverse graphics elements, and on and on and on. It wasn’t going to be documentary business as usual. It was going to be something different. I have suffered for years this idea that interviews aren’t directing and that there’s something really different about real people and actors. Whereas I’ve always believed that it’s really about performance — eliciting a performance, creating a performance on film. That’s true of interviews, it’s true of scripted material, it’s true of reenactments, it’s true of everything. It’s all direction.”
~ Errol Morris