By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Academy Sets Year-Long Exhibition Residency At Metrograph

THE ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS AND SCIENCES ANNOUNCES YEAR-LONG RESIDENCY AT METROGRAPH THEATER NEW YORK

NEW YORK, NY – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced today a yearlong residency at Metrograph Theaters in New York City, beginning July 24, that will showcase high quality film prints from the Academy Film Archive, home to one of the most diverse and extensive motion picture collections in the world.  The monthly series will feature onstage conversations with filmmakers and scholars of motion pictures, tributes, newsreels, rarely seen clips from past Oscar® ceremonies, and home movies from Hollywood legends and some of the most influential filmmakers and artists. The series will begin with tribute screenings to George Stevens and Saul Bass, additional programming to be announced.

Current programming lineup as follows:

A PLACE IN THE SUN: THE CINEMA OF GEORGE STEVENS

Monday, July 24 at 7:00PM at Metrograph Theater

Based on the 1925 novel An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser, George Stevens directs an all star cast including Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor and Shelly Winters in a story of romance, social climbing and murder. A PLACE IN THE SUN (1951) was both a critical and commercial success upon its release in 1951 garnering nine nominations and winning six Oscars® including Best Director.

WHY MAN CREATES: THE WORK OF SAUL BASS

Wednesday, August 2 at 7:00PM at Metrograph Theater

Known for his fluid and geometric title designs and posters, Saul Bass remains one of the most iconic and influential designers of the 20th Century. To illustrate his wide range of works, as well as the impressive list of filmmakers he has collaborated with, the Academy Film Archive has created a reel of his most famous (or lesser seen) title sequences. Following the title reel, the Academy will present three of Bass’s short films: WHY MAN CREATES (1958), THE SEARCHING EYE (1964), and THE SOLAR FILM (1980), all preserved by the Academy Film Archive.

For more information on the monthly programs and to purchase tickets visit www.oscars.org/events.

 

 

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ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 7,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which is under construction in Los Angeles.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
www.oscars.org
www.facebook.com/TheAcademy
www.youtube.com/Oscars
www.twitter.com/TheAcademy

 

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“You know, I was never a critic. I never considered myself as a film critic. I started doing short films, writing screenplays and then for awhile, for a few years I wrote some film theory, including some film criticism because I had to, but I was never… I never had the desire to be a film critic. I never envisioned myself as a film critic, but I did that at a period of my life when I thought I kind of needed to understand things about cinema, understand things about film theory, understand the world map of cinema, and writing about movies gave me that, and also the opportunity to meet filmmakers I admired.

“To me, it was the best possible film school. The way it changed my perspective I suppose is that I believe in this connection between theory and practice. I think that you also make movies with ideas and you need to have ideas about filmmaking to achieve whatever you’re trying to achieve through your movies, but then I started making features in 1986 — a while ago — and I left all that behind.

“For the last three decades I’ve been making movies, I’ve been living, I’ve been observing the world. You become a different person, so basically my perspective on the world in general is very different and I hope that with every movie I make a step forward. I kind of hope I’m a better person, and hopefully a better filmmaker and hopefully try to… It’s very hard for me to go back to a different time when I would have different values in my relationship to filmmaking. I had a stiffer notion of cinema.”
~ Olivier Assayas

A Spirited Exchange

“In some ways Christopher Nolan has become our Stanley Kubrick,” reads the first sentence of David Bordwell’s latest blog post–none of which I want or intend to read after that desperate opening sentence. If he’d written “my” or “some people’s” instead of “our”, I might have read further. Instead, I can only surmise that in some ways David Bordwell may have become our Lars von Trier.”
~ Jonathan Rosenbaum On Facebook

“Jonathan has written a despicable thing in comparing me to Trump. He’s free to read or not read what I write, and even to judge arguments without reading them. It’s not what you’d expect from a sensible critic, but it’s what Jonathan has chosen to do, for reasons of a private nature he has confided to me in an email What I request from him is an apology for comparing my ideas to Trump’s.”
~ David Bordwell Replies

“Yes, I do apologize, sincerely, for such a ridiculous and quite unwarranted comparison. The private nature of my grievance with David probably fueled my post, but it didn’t dictate it, even though I’m willing to concede that I overreacted. Part of what spurred me to post something in the first place is actually related to a positive development in David’s work–an improvement in his prose style ever since he wrote (and wrote very well) about such elegant prose stylists as James Agee and Manny Farber. But this also brought a journalistic edge to his prose, including a dramatic flair for journalistic ‘hooks’ and attention-grabbers, that is part of what I was responding to. Although I realize now that David justifies his opening sentence with what follows, and far less egregiously than I implied he might have, I was responding to the drum roll of that opening sentence as a provocation, which it certainly was and is.”
~ Jonathan Rosenbaum Replies