By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Academy Sets Year-Long Exhibition Residency At Metrograph

THE ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS AND SCIENCES ANNOUNCES YEAR-LONG RESIDENCY AT METROGRAPH THEATER NEW YORK

NEW YORK, NY – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced today a yearlong residency at Metrograph Theaters in New York City, beginning July 24, that will showcase high quality film prints from the Academy Film Archive, home to one of the most diverse and extensive motion picture collections in the world.  The monthly series will feature onstage conversations with filmmakers and scholars of motion pictures, tributes, newsreels, rarely seen clips from past Oscar® ceremonies, and home movies from Hollywood legends and some of the most influential filmmakers and artists. The series will begin with tribute screenings to George Stevens and Saul Bass, additional programming to be announced.

Current programming lineup as follows:

A PLACE IN THE SUN: THE CINEMA OF GEORGE STEVENS

Monday, July 24 at 7:00PM at Metrograph Theater

Based on the 1925 novel An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser, George Stevens directs an all star cast including Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor and Shelly Winters in a story of romance, social climbing and murder. A PLACE IN THE SUN (1951) was both a critical and commercial success upon its release in 1951 garnering nine nominations and winning six Oscars® including Best Director.

WHY MAN CREATES: THE WORK OF SAUL BASS

Wednesday, August 2 at 7:00PM at Metrograph Theater

Known for his fluid and geometric title designs and posters, Saul Bass remains one of the most iconic and influential designers of the 20th Century. To illustrate his wide range of works, as well as the impressive list of filmmakers he has collaborated with, the Academy Film Archive has created a reel of his most famous (or lesser seen) title sequences. Following the title reel, the Academy will present three of Bass’s short films: WHY MAN CREATES (1958), THE SEARCHING EYE (1964), and THE SOLAR FILM (1980), all preserved by the Academy Film Archive.

For more information on the monthly programs and to purchase tickets visit www.oscars.org/events.

 

 

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ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 7,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which is under construction in Los Angeles.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
www.oscars.org
www.facebook.com/TheAcademy
www.youtube.com/Oscars
www.twitter.com/TheAcademy

 

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“Ten years ago at Telluride, I said on a panel that theatrical distribution was dying. It seemed obvious to me. I was surprised how many in the audience violently objected: ‘People will always want to go to the movies!’ That’s true, but it’s also true that theatrical cinema as we once knew it has died. Theatrical cinema is now Event Cinema, just as theatrical plays and musical performances are Events. No one just goes to a movie. It’s a planned occasion. Four types of Event Cinema remain.
1. Spectacle (IMAX-style blockbusters)
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4. Film Club (formerly arthouse but now anything serious).

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