By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE 2017 presented by Chevrolet Announces CITY CINEMA presented by NOW: “Canucks, Comedy, and (John) Candy”

YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE 2017 presented by Chevrolet Announces CITY CINEMA presented by NOW: “Canucks, Comedy, and (John) Candy” 

A great way for Torontonians to celebrate Canada’s sesquicentennial is in the heart of the city at YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE (YDS) while catching a fun flick with City Cinema presented by NOW.

YDS is honouring all things Canadian with a lineup of films that feature Canucks, Comedy, and (John) Candy! The final film will be selected via an Audience Choice contest so City Cinema presented by NOW will close out the season with the most Canadian thing of all … democracy!

Every Tuesday at sunset from June 27 – August 29 (please check individual listings for start time), Yonge-Dundas Square becomes the best destination to pull up a chair and enjoy a movie featuring some of Canada’s greatest talent, including Catherine O’Hara, Seth Rogen, Dan Aykroyd, Jim Carrey, and Eugene Levy.

On Tuesday, June 27, Strange Brew (1983) starring Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas as Canada’s most famous hosers will kick off this summer’s film series. Bob and Doug McKenzie get jobs at a brewery only to find “something funny is brewing at Elsinore Castle.”

On Tuesday, July 4, head down to YDS to watch Bon Cop, Bad Cop (2006) starring Patrick Huard, Colm Feore, and Lucie Laurier, for free before catching the sequel in theatres for not free!

On Tuesday, July 11, don’t think Devo, think blood, bruises, and roller skates when Whip It (2009) starring Ellen Page, Drew Barrymore, Juliette Lewis, and Kristen Wiig screens at YDS.

On Tuesday, July 18, The Naked Gun (1988) starring Leslie Nielson and Priscilla Presley in a tale as old as time; “Boy finds girl, boy loses girl, girl finds boy, boy forgets girl, boy remembers girl, girls dies in a tragic blimp accident over the Orange Bowl on New Year’s Day.”

On Tuesday, July 25, SNL alum Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi go from the television screen to the silver screen with The Blues Brothers (1980) where they make the “most dangerous combination since nitro and glycerine.”

Each feature screening will be preceded by a film by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) including William Shatner Sings Oh Canada, each evening along with I Can Make Art…Like Andrew Qappik and Never Lose Sight (June 27), The Sweater and Ryan (July 4), Margaret Laurence and First Lady of Manawak (July 11), Trans Canada Summer (July 18), and Ladies & Gentlemen…Mr. Leonard Cohen (July 25).

City Cinema will continue through August 29 with The Truman Show (August 1), The Great Outdoors (August 8), Take This Waltz (August 15), Men With Brooms (August 22),  and NOW Audience Choice; visit nowtoronto.com/citycinemavote to choose the final screening of the summer (August 29), plus more NFB films!
Admission is FREE to all City Cinema screenings at
YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE!

For more information and a full schedule of events, please visit YDSquare.ca
All programming is subject to change

About Yonge-Dundas Square: YDS is a unique focal point of the downtown Toronto community. The Square is designated for use as a public open space and as an event venue that can accommodate events of various sizes. You’ll discover a wide range of activities on the Square: community celebrations, theatrical events, concerts, receptions, promotions – events that appeal to residents and tourists alike and provide a showcase for local businesses. YDS Board of Management is an agency of the City of Toronto.

About Chevrolet Canada: Founded in 1911 in Detroit, Chevrolet is now one of the world’s largest car brands, doing business in more than 115 countries and selling more than 4.8 million cars and trucks a year. Chevrolet provides customers with fuel-efficient vehicles that feature engaging performance, design that makes the heart beat, passive and active safety features and easy-to-use technology, all at a value. More information on Chevrolet models can be found at www.chevrolet.ca, on Facebook at facebook.com/chevroletcanada or by following @ChevroletCanada on Twitter.

NOW is one of the most exciting and respected media companies in Canada, and has been a leading progressive voice in the country for 37 years. We are a fiercely independent and progressive media voice when such a voice is required, and as a company, we are committed to social innovation and change making. From Black Lives Matter, to The Future of Cities, Climate Change and Food Security, we capture the pulse of the conversations that matter, right now. We are also a thought leader in the verticals that matter: politics, music, food & drink, arts & culture. And we are the best resource for how to enjoy Toronto with the city’s most comprehensive event listings. We also have true reach: with 471,000 readers a week (print & digital), our powerful media footprint extends all across the City of Toronto and beyond. www.nowtoronto.com

The NFB is Canada’s public producer of award-winning creative documentaries, auteur animation, and groundbreaking interactive stories, installations and participatory experiences. NFB producers are deeply embedded in communities across the country, working with talented artists and creators in production studios from St. John’s to Vancouver, on projects that stand out for their excellence in storytelling, their innovation, and their social resonance. NFB productions have won over 5,000 awards, including 18 Canadian Screen Awards, 17 Webbys, 12 Oscars and more than 90 Genies. To access many of these works, visit NFB.ca or download the NFB’s apps for mobile devices and connected TV.

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch