By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE 2017 presented by Chevrolet Announces CITY CINEMA presented by NOW: “Canucks, Comedy, and (John) Candy”

YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE 2017 presented by Chevrolet Announces CITY CINEMA presented by NOW: “Canucks, Comedy, and (John) Candy” 

A great way for Torontonians to celebrate Canada’s sesquicentennial is in the heart of the city at YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE (YDS) while catching a fun flick with City Cinema presented by NOW.

YDS is honouring all things Canadian with a lineup of films that feature Canucks, Comedy, and (John) Candy! The final film will be selected via an Audience Choice contest so City Cinema presented by NOW will close out the season with the most Canadian thing of all … democracy!

Every Tuesday at sunset from June 27 – August 29 (please check individual listings for start time), Yonge-Dundas Square becomes the best destination to pull up a chair and enjoy a movie featuring some of Canada’s greatest talent, including Catherine O’Hara, Seth Rogen, Dan Aykroyd, Jim Carrey, and Eugene Levy.

On Tuesday, June 27, Strange Brew (1983) starring Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas as Canada’s most famous hosers will kick off this summer’s film series. Bob and Doug McKenzie get jobs at a brewery only to find “something funny is brewing at Elsinore Castle.”

On Tuesday, July 4, head down to YDS to watch Bon Cop, Bad Cop (2006) starring Patrick Huard, Colm Feore, and Lucie Laurier, for free before catching the sequel in theatres for not free!

On Tuesday, July 11, don’t think Devo, think blood, bruises, and roller skates when Whip It (2009) starring Ellen Page, Drew Barrymore, Juliette Lewis, and Kristen Wiig screens at YDS.

On Tuesday, July 18, The Naked Gun (1988) starring Leslie Nielson and Priscilla Presley in a tale as old as time; “Boy finds girl, boy loses girl, girl finds boy, boy forgets girl, boy remembers girl, girls dies in a tragic blimp accident over the Orange Bowl on New Year’s Day.”

On Tuesday, July 25, SNL alum Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi go from the television screen to the silver screen with The Blues Brothers (1980) where they make the “most dangerous combination since nitro and glycerine.”

Each feature screening will be preceded by a film by the National Film Board of Canada (NFB) including William Shatner Sings Oh Canada, each evening along with I Can Make Art…Like Andrew Qappik and Never Lose Sight (June 27), The Sweater and Ryan (July 4), Margaret Laurence and First Lady of Manawak (July 11), Trans Canada Summer (July 18), and Ladies & Gentlemen…Mr. Leonard Cohen (July 25).

City Cinema will continue through August 29 with The Truman Show (August 1), The Great Outdoors (August 8), Take This Waltz (August 15), Men With Brooms (August 22),  and NOW Audience Choice; visit nowtoronto.com/citycinemavote to choose the final screening of the summer (August 29), plus more NFB films!
Admission is FREE to all City Cinema screenings at
YONGE-DUNDAS SQUARE!

For more information and a full schedule of events, please visit YDSquare.ca
All programming is subject to change

About Yonge-Dundas Square: YDS is a unique focal point of the downtown Toronto community. The Square is designated for use as a public open space and as an event venue that can accommodate events of various sizes. You’ll discover a wide range of activities on the Square: community celebrations, theatrical events, concerts, receptions, promotions – events that appeal to residents and tourists alike and provide a showcase for local businesses. YDS Board of Management is an agency of the City of Toronto.

About Chevrolet Canada: Founded in 1911 in Detroit, Chevrolet is now one of the world’s largest car brands, doing business in more than 115 countries and selling more than 4.8 million cars and trucks a year. Chevrolet provides customers with fuel-efficient vehicles that feature engaging performance, design that makes the heart beat, passive and active safety features and easy-to-use technology, all at a value. More information on Chevrolet models can be found at www.chevrolet.ca, on Facebook at facebook.com/chevroletcanada or by following @ChevroletCanada on Twitter.

NOW is one of the most exciting and respected media companies in Canada, and has been a leading progressive voice in the country for 37 years. We are a fiercely independent and progressive media voice when such a voice is required, and as a company, we are committed to social innovation and change making. From Black Lives Matter, to The Future of Cities, Climate Change and Food Security, we capture the pulse of the conversations that matter, right now. We are also a thought leader in the verticals that matter: politics, music, food & drink, arts & culture. And we are the best resource for how to enjoy Toronto with the city’s most comprehensive event listings. We also have true reach: with 471,000 readers a week (print & digital), our powerful media footprint extends all across the City of Toronto and beyond. www.nowtoronto.com

The NFB is Canada’s public producer of award-winning creative documentaries, auteur animation, and groundbreaking interactive stories, installations and participatory experiences. NFB producers are deeply embedded in communities across the country, working with talented artists and creators in production studios from St. John’s to Vancouver, on projects that stand out for their excellence in storytelling, their innovation, and their social resonance. NFB productions have won over 5,000 awards, including 18 Canadian Screen Awards, 17 Webbys, 12 Oscars and more than 90 Genies. To access many of these works, visit NFB.ca or download the NFB’s apps for mobile devices and connected TV.

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