MCN Blogs
Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

What Did John J. Avildsen Movies Mean To You?

First reactions online (especially on Twitter) to the passing of the director of The Karate Kid, Lean on Me and Rocky have been emotional. What did his movies mean to you, from childhood, later?

3 Responses to “What Did John J. Avildsen Movies Mean To You?”

  1. Sideshow Bill says:

    They meant a lot to me, especially The Karate Kid. I still remember the first time I saw it, on an old VHS tape. I love it to this day. I introduced my kids to it years later and they loved it too. Underrated filmmaker. Had a very gentle humanism. The moment at the end of TKK where Johnny congratulates Daniel has always stuck with me. And as a bonus Elizabeth Shue war gorgeous in that movie (still is). RIP

  2. PTA Fluffer says:

    I was the only film student movie snob working at the multiplex (four screens!) the weekend Karate Kid opened. Audiences were going nuts, but I was dismissive. He’s just repeating himself with another underdog sports story! Who? they asked. The director, John G. Avildsen. Who???!

    Nobody cared about who directed it. Karate Kid made viewers have an emotional experience at the movies, they cheered at the end, etc. No higher compliment could be paid to a filmmaker.

  3. hcat says:

    No matter how many times I have seen the end of Rocky or the Karate Kid, they still get me so immersed in them I am nervous watching the endings, and even though I know it is coming (and any film watcher knew it was coming when watching it the first time) the feeling of elation and tension when Daniel hobbles into the crane pose….while we often lament straight over the plate filmmaking, when it is this well done, just delivers the magic of movies.

    And of all the love stories that have been filmed in my lifetime, I gotta put Rocky in the top ten, beautiful switch at the end where the climax is not the bell to end the fight but his calling for Adrian after the fight is over.

The Hot Blog

Hcat on: BYO Keanu

movieman on: BYO Keanu

Sideshow Bill on: BYO Keanu

Triple Option on: BYO Keanu

Triple Option on: BYO Keanu

leahnz on: BYO Summertime Blues

movieman on: BYO Keanu

Serg on: BYO Keanu

Hcat on: BYO Keanu

BO Sock Puppet on: BYO Keanu

Quote Unquotesee all »

“With any character, the way I think about it is, you have the role on the page, you have the vision of the director and you have your life experience… I thought it was one of the foundations of the role for John Wick. I love his grief. For the character and in life, it’s about the love of the person you’re grieving for, and any time you can keep company with that fire, it is warm. I absolutely relate to that, and I don’t think you ever work through it. Grief and loss, those are things that don’t ever go away. They stay with you.”
~ Keanu Reeves

“I was checking through stuff the other day for technical reasons. I came across The Duellists on Netflix and I was absolutely stunned to see that it was exquisitely graded. So, while I rarely look up my old stuff, I stopped to give it ten minutes. Bugger me, I was there for two hours. I was really fucking pleased with what it was and how the engine still worked within the equation and that engine was the insanity and stupidity of war. War between two men, in that case, who fight on thought they both eventually can’t remember the reason why. It was great, yeah. The great thing about these platforms now is that, one way or another, they’ll seek out and then put out the best possible form and the long form. Frequently, films get cut down because of that curse in which the studio felt or feels that they have to preview. And there’s nothing worse than a preview to diminish the original intent.Oh, yeah, how about every fucking time? And I’ve stewed about films later even more because when you tell the same joke 20 times the joke’s no longer funny. When you tell a bad joke once or twice? It’s fine. But come on, now. Here’s the key on the way I feel when I approach the movie: I try to keep myself as withdrawn from the project as possible once I’ve filmed it. And – this is all key on this – then getting a really excellent editor so I never have to sit in on editing. What happens if you sit in is you become stale and every passage or joke, metaphorically speaking, gets more and more tired. You start cutting it all back because of fatigue. So what you have to do is keep your distance and therefore, in a funny kind of way, you, as the director, should be the preview and that’s it.”
~ Sir Ridley Scott