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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

What Did John J. Avildsen Movies Mean To You?

First reactions online (especially on Twitter) to the passing of the director of The Karate Kid, Lean on Me and Rocky have been emotional. What did his movies mean to you, from childhood, later?

3 Responses to “What Did John J. Avildsen Movies Mean To You?”

  1. Sideshow Bill says:

    They meant a lot to me, especially The Karate Kid. I still remember the first time I saw it, on an old VHS tape. I love it to this day. I introduced my kids to it years later and they loved it too. Underrated filmmaker. Had a very gentle humanism. The moment at the end of TKK where Johnny congratulates Daniel has always stuck with me. And as a bonus Elizabeth Shue war gorgeous in that movie (still is). RIP

  2. PTA Fluffer says:

    I was the only film student movie snob working at the multiplex (four screens!) the weekend Karate Kid opened. Audiences were going nuts, but I was dismissive. He’s just repeating himself with another underdog sports story! Who? they asked. The director, John G. Avildsen. Who???!

    Nobody cared about who directed it. Karate Kid made viewers have an emotional experience at the movies, they cheered at the end, etc. No higher compliment could be paid to a filmmaker.

  3. hcat says:

    No matter how many times I have seen the end of Rocky or the Karate Kid, they still get me so immersed in them I am nervous watching the endings, and even though I know it is coming (and any film watcher knew it was coming when watching it the first time) the feeling of elation and tension when Daniel hobbles into the crane pose….while we often lament straight over the plate filmmaking, when it is this well done, just delivers the magic of movies.

    And of all the love stories that have been filmed in my lifetime, I gotta put Rocky in the top ten, beautiful switch at the end where the climax is not the bell to end the fight but his calling for Adrian after the fight is over.

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