MCN Blogs
Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

“Twin Peaks” SPOILER Zone

Anyone reading write-ups of the episodes now that six of eighteen episodes are out in the world? What are the best theories? What are the things that should never get explained? Elements of Eraserhead, pieces of Lynch’s never-produced “Ronnie Rocket” screenplay and outtakes from Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me have echoed into the unfurling narrative. Does Lynch’s one-minute Lumière tribute short, Premonitions Following an Evil Deed, tell us anything?

11 Responses to ““Twin Peaks” SPOILER Zone”

  1. YancySkancy says:

    I can’t contribute anything much to a discussion, because I’ve seen only the first two episodes, which Hulu briefly made available, and I have no idea when I’ll be able to watch the rest (not particularly interested in ponying up for Showtime at the moment). But I will say I enjoyed the hell out of those two. Lynch never apologizes, never explains, and his dreamlike, WTF aesthetic is clearly not to all tastes, but I prefer it to all these other recent WTF shows, such as Legion, The OA, The Leftovers, etc. For one thing, Lynch’s shtick is often laugh-out-loud hilarious, and his images and sound work are indelible. But I suspect any search for “meaning” will be more or less fruitless. The trick is not minding.

  2. PTA Fluffer says:

    At its most basic level of interpretation, TP offers a gnostic view of the world, one in which energetic beings like Archons (the Black Lodge crowd) not only feed off the pain and sorrow that humans experience, but actively seek it. Anything else is just window dressing on that basic thematic idea.

    As for the show itself, it continues through six episodes to offer one of the most bizarre, disturbing, and hypnotic “movie” experiences I’ve had since… the last David Lynch movie. Word to the wise: episode six should carry a trigger warning for parents of small children. Just sayin’. Very disturbing stuff.

  3. Sideshow Bill says:

    I’ve found it absolutely thrilling. It’s Lynch without a net. I will admit that I’m beginning to get a bit frustrated with the Dougie Jones stuff but frustration has always been an essential part of Lynch’s work. It wouldn’t be whole without it. I love the expansion of the world beyond the town of Twin Peaks. I loved seeing Harry Dean Stanton’s amazing face. It’s been a hell of a thing to watch so far and hope it maintains.

  4. Movieman says:

    Agree w/ Bill.
    I’d lie if I told you I knew exactly what was going on. But, truth be told, I don’t really care.
    It’s like spending an hour in David Lynch’s brain every Sunday night and I’m loving it.
    Doubtful that a theatrical release this year will give me as much intense pleasure.
    Does anyone know whether Showtime plans on running the entire 18 hours this year?

  5. Sideshow Bill says:

    Movieman, as far as I know all 18 hours are running this straight through this Summer. An 18 hour David Lynch movie is a great way to make up for a crappy movie Summer so far.

  6. Mostly Lurking says:

    Guess I’ll be the lone voice of dissent. I really enjoyed the first two episodes, mostly enjoyed episodes three and four, but have found parts five and six to be fairly tedious. I have no problem with slow moving (and agree it is par for the course with Lynch), but I find myself downright bored with the Dougie material and it has to make up a good 50% of the the past two episodes.

    Spoilers follow: For now I am reserving judgment on what I think of what appears to be the senseless and gratuitous on screen death of a young child. I’m generally not very squeamish, but I have to admit my initial reaction was repulsion because, not to be repetitive, but as of now it seems gratuitous.

  7. leahnz says:

    i really want to see this, but i don’t have the channel it’s on and missed the free eps (hopefully it’ll be available to stream or something soon; the prospect of new lynch makes me anxious for some reason, nervous)

  8. Movieman says:

    Good to know, Bill.
    I was wondering if that was the plan since everyone (AMC and HBO are the biggest champions of this trend) seems to love splitting a finite # of episodes into multiple “seasons” these days.

  9. Sideshow Bill says:

    Mostly Lurking, I agree it was disturbing but I personally didn’t find it “repulsive” or offensive. I mean I am ALWAYS affected when a child dies on screen. It’s rough territory to enter. But what Lynch did, I think, isn’t very different from when John Carpenter shot that little girl in Assault On Precinct 13. It wasn’t played for a joke or a laugh. It was pretty harrowing and i think it was meant to be. That’s my take any way.

  10. Mostly Lurking says:

    Sideshow, I see what you’re saying, which is why I qualified my comment with “as of now”. Because I view this as an eighteen hour movie, I’m reserving final judgment until I can view the work in its entirety. However my initial reaction was negative because although you might be right that it will turn out it’s meant to be or serves a greater purpose in the overall story than if the victim had been older, nothing had been done up to that point to allow me to look back and say, yeah, that was tough to watch but it makes sense and I can see why he did that.

  11. Sideshow Bill says:

    I see what you’re getting at. And I agree. We’re watching an 18-hour David Lynch movie. It’s going to be weeks before we get a handle on what it is.

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

“TIFF doesn’t make attendance numbers for its Lightbox screenings publicly available, so it’s difficult to gauge exactly how many filmgoers the Lightbox is attracting (or how much money it’s bringing in). But the King Street West venue hasn’t become a significant draw for film enthusiasts. The Lightbox’s attendance has plunged – 49,000 fewer visitors last year, a drop of 27 per cent, according to figures recently reported in the Toronto Star. Its gallery space – designed to showcase the visions of cinema’s most iconic filmmakers – saw most of its exhibitions staff quietly axed this past fall. And its marketing barely escapes the Lightbox’s walls. Unless you are a TIFF member or one of the city’s most avid filmgoers, you could walk by the Lightbox and remain blissfully unaware of a single thing that goes on inside. TIFF “still has a world-class brand,” said Barry Avrich, a filmmaker and former board member, “but it’s going to take some fresh vision from retail, consumer programming and marketing experts, given how the lines have become intensely blurred when it comes to how people watch film. They will have to experiment with programming to find the right blend of function and relevance.”
~ Globe & Mail Epic On State of Toronto Int’l (paywalled)

“I’m 87 years old… I only eat so I can smoke and stay alive… The only fear I have is how long consciousness is gonna hang on after my body goes. I just hope there’s nothing. Like there was before I was born. I’m not really into religion, they’re all macrocosms of the ego. When man began to think he was a separate person with a separate soul, it created a violent situation.

“The void, the concept of nothingness, is terrifying to most people on the planet. And I get anxiety attacks myself. I know the fear of that void. You have to learn to die before you die. You give up, surrender to the void, to nothingness.

“Anybody else you’ve interviewed bring these things up? Hang on, I gotta take this call… Hey, brother. That’s great, man. Yeah, I’m being interviewed… We’re talking about nothing. I’ve got him well-steeped in nothing right now. He’s stopped asking questions.”
~ Harry Dean Stanton