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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

“Twin Peaks: Familiar Faces 25 Years Later”

David Lynch is about to unleash an 18-hour serial on the world. What are the chances of it being great?

4 Responses to ““Twin Peaks: Familiar Faces 25 Years Later””

  1. Movieman says:

    The fact that nobody has opined on this thread speaks volumes, doesn’t it?
    As a longtime Lynch fanatic, I’m hoping for the best, but prepared for the (absolute) worst.
    Truth be told, there isn’t a single movie opening this summer that I’m as enthused about as the tantalizing prospect of 18 hours of Lynch-directed cable television.
    Fingers crossed.

  2. YancySkancy says:

    It has a good chance of being great, I imagine, but I’d be more enthusiastic if it were going to be on Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, or HBO Now, because those are the services I’m paying for now, and I don’t really want to cough up for another one. So I expect I’ll come to it way after the fact. I’ll try to maintain my optimism until then.

  3. Movieman says:

    I feel your pocket book pain, Yancy.
    I purposely held onto Showtime after the recent “Homeland” season ended just for “Twin Peaks.”

  4. Sideshow Bill says:

    I’m excited as hell. I rewatched Fire, Walk With Me last night and it holds up. Also watched the pilot. It, too, holds up, although all the rotary dial phones, even in 1990, were funny. Gonna rewatch the whole series before this starts.

    As it stands this may be the last Lynch directed project we ever get so I’m gonna savor it and go into it with arms open.

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