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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Trailering Soderbergh’s Semi-Self-Distributed LOGAN LUCKY

7 Responses to “Trailering Soderbergh’s Semi-Self-Distributed LOGAN LUCKY”

  1. Movieman says:

    No studio wanted to take this on?
    Seriously??
    Looks delightful, and any movie w/ Katherine Waterston, Riley Keough (bow) and Adam Driver is A O.K. in my book.
    Not to mention it marks the “return” of Soderbergh.

  2. Ray Pride says:

    Soderbergh has gone from self-financing to self-distributing, down to recruiting a key collaborator on the release of Magic Mike: “Soderbergh formed film distributor Fingerprint with Dan Fellman, former President of Domestic Distribution for Warner Bros., with Amazon providing strategic P&A financing to augment the marketing of Fingerprint’s theatrical releases “The deal with Amazon is the final, crucial piece of the puzzle,” says Soderbergh. “The scale of this endeavor required a fearless, flexible co-conspirator, and Amazon has shown they have the appetite and vision to help us navigate these semi-unchartered waters. I’m both relieved and excited, which is one of my favorite states of being.”

  3. greg says:

    that looks great.. absolutely shitty title, but great trailer

  4. Js partisan says:

    Yeah. Like I mentioned in the box office thread, Executives need to fucking take chances again, and that they passed on this? Demonstrates, how the MSCU, has scared these people into stupid, stupid decisions.

  5. J says:

    What makes everyone think that the studios passed on this? I know they’re an easy whipping boy, but doesn’t seem logical.

    What seems more likely is that Soderbergh is purposely bypassing them so that he and Channing (both of whom, I believe, funded the film — as they did Magic Mike) can have more control and a bigger slice of the pie.

    Think about – what studio would ever let him do that Amazon deal? Soderbergh’s always been about disruption and innovation. This is simply the latest way to do it. After the back-end money he and Tatum made on MM (by Soderbergh’s account, he made more money on MM than anything else he’s done), he must be intrigued to see how much further he can push it. This way he has total control of distribution and marketing and an even bigger slice of the back end.

    The best corollary would be Louis CK and his TV show, Horace and Pete. He funded it himself and now stands to make all the future money himself — seems to have worked out well for him, given him selling it exclusively to Hulu.

    On LL, I’d bet that with the Amazon deal done, they’re already in the black (or near it) on production costs. After P & A costs are recouped, they’ll go right into profit.

  6. Geoff says:

    Sure this isn’t a Coen Bros film?

  7. leahnz says:

    i have a sphincter-factor 9.5 reaction to crappy put-on accents and there’s some clenching going on watching that
    (charlotte motor speedway, charlotte’s north carolina — as is the coca cola 600 looked that up — so crappy NC accents? could swear some of them sound like bad texas, maybe they start out in texas)

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