By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Film Festival Alliance Sets New Leadership

Dallas, TX (April 20, 2017) – Following a successful fourth annual conference in conjunction with the Art House Convergence in January, the Film Festival Alliance (FFA) has officially announced a newly elected Board of Directors, building on FFA’s established foundation to become North America’s preeminent film festival service organization, strengthening this vital segment of the film exhibition industry, and providing even more robust resources to help mission-driven film festivals meet their community needs.

The newly elected Board of Directors includes President Dan Brawley (Cucalorus Film Festival), Vice President Andrew Rodgers (Denver Film Society), Treasurer Anne Chaisson  (Hamptons International Film Festival and FFA founding member), Secretary Judy Laster (Woods Hole Film Festival, FFA founding member) and Jon Gann (Founder DC Shorts Film Festival, Past Program Director, FFA.)

Members at large include Beth Barrett (SIFF), Clint Bowie (New Orleans Film Society), Mark Fishkin (Califiornia Film Institute) and Josh Leake (Portland Film Festival.)

FFA has hired Lela Meadow-Conner (Tallgrass Film Association) to serve in a consulting role as the Acting Executive Director. A founder of Wichita’s Tallgrass Film Festival, its former Executive Director, and current Creative Director, she brings her entrepreneurial spirit and love of film festivals to the FFA. The alliance’s founding members created a strong framework and the group is committed to constructing a productive and valuable organization for all film festival folks. “It’s important to us that we are an inclusive group for all film festival professionals and that we recognize our common threads, and appreciate those characteristics that make every festival unique,” said Meadow-Conner.

“Along with developing the best programming for our fifth annual conference in January, 2018, we’ll be focusing on learning from our members how best we can help service our industry and advocate for film festivals of all sizes and genres across the country,” said Brawley.

Film festival professionals may join as an individual member or as an organization. For membership information, go to: www.filmfestivalalliance.org.

ABOUT FILM FESTIVAL ALLIANCE
Originally founded in 2010 as a program of IFP, FFA was established in 2015 as an independent non-profit organization to develop and foster collaboration among mission-driven film festivals around the world and create a sustainable professional environment for the presentation of film and media programs. Through integrity, collaboration, courage, inclusion and creativity, FFA champions the vital role of film festivals, filmmakers and cinema culture in the 21st Century and beyond. Founding festivals include Sundance Institute, Full Frame Documentary Institute, SXSW and Milwaukee Film.

Contact:
Dan Brawley, President
dan@cucalorus.org

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“Because of my relative candor on Twitter regarding why I quit my day job, my DMs have overflowed with similar stories from colleagues around the globe. These peeks behind the curtains of film festivals, venues, distributors and funding bodies weren’t pretty. Certain dismal patterns recurred (and resonated): Boards who don’t engage with or even understand their organization’s artistic mission and are insensitive to the diverse neighborhood in which their organization’s venue is located; incompetent founders and/or presidents who create only obstacles, never solutions; unduly empowered, Trumpian bean counters who chip away at the taste and experiences that make organizations’ cultural offerings special; expensive PR teams that don’t bring to the table a bare-minimum familiarity with the rich subcultural art form they’re half-heartedly peddling as “product”; nonprofit arts organizations for whom art now ranks as a distant-second goal behind profit.”
~ Eric Allen Hatch

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