By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

True/False Film Fest And Kickstarter Will Provide Childcare To Visiting Filmmakers, Artists And Musicians

FEBRUARY 10, 2017

True/False Film Fest

TRUE/FALSE and KICKSTARTER ANNOUNCE NEW CHILD CARE INITIATIVE TO SUPPORT FAMILIES IN FILM

Visiting artists will have access to free daycare during the four-day festival

In 2017, True/False Film Fest is partnering with Kickstarter to expand its staff childcare initiative to include visiting filmmakers, artists, and musicians. True/False will provide free, professional daycare during the four-day weekend of the Fest in order to make the festival more accessible to artists with young children.

Through this initiative, True/False & Kickstarter seek to support the real, current needs of low-income and single parents, as well as model possibilities for other festivals on how to be more feminist and equitable.

“Festivals play a vital role as gathering places for the film world,” says True/False Co-conspirator David Wilson. “If our guests can’t travel because of young children, they risk missing out on making connections that could lead to future projects.”

Family obligations, especially as they pertain to young children, impact more women than men. While these maternity issues ­mirror the problems affecting many women in male-dominated workplaces, they are heightened in the film industry: filmmaking demands long hours, erratic schedules, and extensive travel. These factors create obstacles that wedge women without a financial cushion out of the film industry.

 

With the support of Kickstarter, True/False hopes to offset the cost of expensive child care and help parents give birth to their films, build essential industry relationships and remember why documentary filmmaking is an urgent art.

 

“A lot of our attention and resources at Kickstarter are going towards contributing to sustainability within the documentary community,” says Liz Cook, Kickstarter’s Director of Documentary Film. “While we are thrilled this will be able to support both male and female directors, this collaboration really stemmed from a conversation with True/False about our internal initiatives centered around supporting female filmmakers. This is a totally new type of partnership for us at Kickstarter and we are incredibly excited to be collaborating with True/False to offer this important resource for creators with children.”

 

The Cradle, True/False’s new daycare will be held at the Picturehouse Theater (inside the United Methodist Church, located in the epicenter of the festival) and run by licensed child care providers employed by the church. Hours will be 3 – 7pm Thursday, 8am – 7pm Friday and Saturday, and 1 – 7pm on Sunday. Directors presenting films after hours can arrange supplemental child care through True/False Hospitality.


The True/False Film Fest will take place March 2-5 in downtown Columbia, Missouri. For more information, please visit truefalse.org.

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