By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Oscar Adds Presenters Amy Adams, Riz Ahmed, Javier Bardem, John Cho, Dwayne Johnson, Felicity Jones, Dwayne Johnson, Felicity Jones, Leslie Mann, Janelle Monáe, David Oyelowo, Emma Stone, Charlize Theron

[PR] LOS ANGELES, CA – Producers Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd today announced the third slate of presenters for the 89th Oscars. Hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, the Oscars will air live Sunday, February 26, on the ABC Television Network.

The presenters, including past Oscar winners and nominees, are Amy Adams, Riz Ahmed, Javier Bardem, John Cho, Dwayne Johnson, Felicity Jones, Leslie Mann, Janelle Monáe, David Oyelowo, Emma Stone and Charlize Theron.

“No matter who you are or where you live, movies bring us together,” said De Luca and Todd.  “Through indelible, fearless performances these extraordinary actors help make it happen.  We are thrilled to welcome them to the 89th Oscars stage.”

Adams received an Oscar nomination for Actress in a Leading Role for “American Hustle” (2013).  Additionally, she has earned four nominations for Actress in a Supporting Role for her work in “The Master” (2012), “The Fighter” (2010), “Doubt” (2008) and “Junebug” (2005).  Her notable credits also include “Arrival” (2016), “Nocturnal Animals” (2016), “Big Eyes” (2014), “Her” (2013) and “Julie & Julia” (2009).  Adams will next appear in “Justice League.”

Ahmed appeared in the Oscar-nominated films “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” (2016) and “Nightcrawler” (2014).  Additionally, his credits include “Jason Bourne” (2016), “The Reluctant Fundamentalist” (2013), “Ill Manors” (2012), “Day of the Falcon” (2011), “Centurion” (2010) and “Four Lions” (2010).

Bardem won an Oscar for Actor in a Supporting Role for “No Country for Old Men” (2007).  He has been nominated for Actor in a Leading Role twice, for “Biutiful” (2010) and “Before Night Falls” (2000).  Bardem starred in the Oscar-winning films “Skyfall” (2012) and “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (2008).  Other notable credits include “The Counselor” (2013), “Eat Pray Love” (2010), “The Sea Inside” (2004) and “Mondays in the Sun” (2002).  Bardem will appear next in “Escobar”, “mother!” and “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales.”

Cho’s credits include the Oscar-winning film “Star Trek” (2009), as well as the Oscar-nominated films “Star Trek Beyond” (2016) and “Star Trek Into Darkness” (2013).  Additionally, Cho’s film credits include “Identity Thief” (2013), “Total Recall” (2012), “Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist” (2008), “Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle” (2004) and “American Pie” (1999).  He will next appear in “Gemini.”

Johnson appears in the Oscar-nominated film “Moana” (2016).  His recent feature credits also include “Central Intelligence” (2016), “Furious Seven” (2015), “San Andreas” (2015), “Hercules” (2014), “G.I. Joe: Retaliation” (2013) and “Pain & Gain” (2013).  Johnson will appear next in “Baywatch,” “The Fate of the Furious” and “Jumanji.”

Jones received an Oscar nomination for Actress in a Leading Role for “The Theory of Everything” (2014).  She also appeared in the Oscar-nominated films “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” (2016) and “The Invisible Woman” (2013).  Jones’s feature credits also include “A Monster Calls” (2016), “Inferno” (2016), “Breathe In” (2014) and “Like Crazy” (2011).

Mann’s feature credits include the Oscar-nominated films “ParaNorman” (2012) and “Rio” (2011).  Additionally, she has appeared in “The Comedian” (2016), “How to Be Single” (2016), “The Other Woman” (2014), “Rio 2″ (2014), “This Is 40″ (2012), “Funny People” (2009), “Knocked Up” (2007) and “The 40 Year-Old Virgin” (2005).  Mann will next appear in “The Pact.”

Actress and recording artist Monáe appears in the Oscar-nominated films “Hidden Figures” (2016) and “Moonlight” (2016). In addition, her credits also include a speaking role in the animated feature “Rio 2″ (2014), for which she also contributed an original song. Monáe’s music was also used on the soundtracks for “Bad Moms” (2016), “The Equalizer” (2014), “Think Like a Man Too” (2014) and “Happy Feet 2″ (2011).

Oyelowo’s credits include the Oscar-winning films “Selma” (2014), “Interstellar” (2014), “Lincoln” (2012) and “The Help” (2011) as well as the Oscar-nominated film “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” (2011).  Additionally, he has appeared in “Queen of Katwe” (2016), “Five Nights in Maine” (2016), “Captive” (2015), “A Most Violent Year” (2014), “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” (2013) and “Jack Reacher” (2012).  Oyelowo can currently be seen in “A United Kingdom” and will next appear in “God Particle.”

Stone received an Oscar nomination for Actress in a Leading Role for “La La Land” (2016).  Additionally, she garnered an Actress in a Supporting Role nomination for “Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)” (2014).  Stone’s credits also include the Oscar-winning film “The Help” (2011) and the Oscar-nominated animated feature “The Croods” (2013).  She has also appeared in “Irrational Man” (2015), “Magic in the Moonlight” (2014), “The Amazing Spider-Man 2″ (2014), “Gangster Squad” (2013), “The Amazing Spider-Man” (2012), “Crazy, Stupid, Love” (2011), “Easy A” (2010) and “Zombieland” (2009). Stone will next appear in “Battle of the Sexes.”

Theron won an Oscar for Actress in a Leading Role for “Monster” (2003).  Additionally, she garnered an Actress in a LEADING* Role nomination for “North Country” (2005).  Theron’s feature credits also include the Oscar-winning films “Mad Max: Fury Road” (2015) and “The Cider House Rules” (1999) as well as the Oscar-nominated films “Kubo and the Two Strings” (2016), “Snow White and the Huntsman” (2012), “Prometheus” (2012) and “In the Valley of Elah” (2007).  She will next appear in “The Fate of the Furious,” “The Coldest City” and “Tully.”

The 89th Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center®in Hollywood, and will be broadcast live on the ABC Television Network at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT.  The Oscars, produced by De Luca and Todd and hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, also will be televised in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.  Additionally, “The Oscars: All Access” live stream from the red carpet and backstage will begin at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT on Oscar.com.

 

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2 Responses to “Oscar Adds Presenters Amy Adams, Riz Ahmed, Javier Bardem, John Cho, Dwayne Johnson, Felicity Jones, Dwayne Johnson, Felicity Jones, Leslie Mann, Janelle Monáe, David Oyelowo, Emma Stone, Charlize Theron”

  1. Alan R says:

    Small correction: Charlize Theron was nominated for Actress in a Leading Role for North Country.

  2. Ray Pride says:

    As provided by the Academy (Note the [PR] mark.) Happy to asterisk!

Quote Unquotesee all »

This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin