By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Lin-Manuel Miranda, Auli’i Cravalho, Sting, Justin Timberlake, John Legend To Perform For Oscar

LIN-MANUEL MIRANDA, AULI’I CRAVALHO, STING, JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE AND JOHN LEGEND TO PERFORM THIS YEAR’S NOMINATED SONGS
AT THE OSCARS®

LOS ANGELES, CA – Oscar® nominees Lin-Manuel Miranda, Sting, Justin Timberlake and 2014 Oscar winner John Legend will perform at the 89th Oscars® ceremony, show producers Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd announced today. Hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, the Oscars will air live on Sunday, February 26, on the ABC Television Network.

“We’re thrilled to welcome these world-class artists to the Oscars. These performances will not only celebrate the five extraordinary nominated original songs, but also the integral part music plays in movies,” De Luca and Todd said.

Auli’i Cravalho will join Miranda to perform his Oscar-nominated song, “How Far I’ll Go,” written for “Moana.” An actor, playwright and composer, Miranda is best known for creating and starring in the Broadway musicals “Hamilton” and “In the Heights.” For his work, he has been recognized with a Primetime Emmy Award®, three Tony Awards®, two Grammy Awards® and the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Drama (“Hamilton”). This marks Miranda’s debut on the Oscars stage. Sixteen-year-old Cravalho made her film debut voicing the title character in “Moana.”

Seventeen-time Grammy winner Sting will perform “The Empty Chair” from “Jim: The James Foley Story,” the Oscar nominated song he co-wrote with three-time Oscar nominee J. Ralph. In addition to this current nomination, Sting has been nominated in this category on three previous occasions; “You Will Be My Ain True Love” from “Cold Mountain” (2003), “Until” from “Kate & Leopold” (2001) and “My Funny Friend And Me” from “The Emperor’s New Groove” (2000), which he shared with David Hartley. A 2014 Kennedy Center Honoree, Sting has sold over 100 million records.

Timberlake will perform his Oscar-nominated song “Can’t Stop The Feeling” from the movie “Trolls.” He shares music and lyric credits with Max Martin and Karl Johan Schuster. Timberlake is a multi-platinum recording artist and actor whose numerous awards include nine Grammy Awards and four Primetime Emmy Awards. His acting credits include the Oscar-winning film “The Social Network” (2010) and Oscar-nominated “Inside Llewyn Davis” (2013).

Legend will perform both “Audition (The Fools Who Dream)” and “City of Stars,” from “La La Land,” music by Justin Hurwitz; lyrics by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. A singer-songwriter, musician and actor, Legend won an Oscar for the original song “Glory” from “Selma” (2014), an honor he shared with artist Common. Legend’s many accolades also include 10 Grammy Awards and 28 nominations.

The 89th Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center®in Hollywood, and will be broadcast live on the ABC Television Network at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT. The Oscars, produced by De Luca and Todd and hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, also will be televised in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide. Additionally, “The Oscars: All Access” live stream from the red carpet and backstage will begin at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT on Oscar.com.

 

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ABOUT THE ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 7,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, which is under construction in Los Angeles.

FOLLOW THE ACADEMY
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