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By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

BYOB: RIP, Bill Paxton

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11 Responses to “BYOB: RIP, Bill Paxton”

  1. Pete B. says:

    Good God, that truly sucks. Bill Paxton was great. He could put a spin on a line of dialog and truly make it his own. And his directorial debut of Frailty was vastly underappreciated. You will be missed sir. You will be missed. I went out and bought the Hatfields & McCoys today just to honor you and your sole Emmy win.

  2. Movieman says:

    “Big Love” to Bill Paxton.
    R.I.P., sir.

  3. LBB says:

    A true Texas boy who never lost the Texas or the boy. Made it through sheer talent, charisma, and spark. He made everything he did his own and leaves behind great work large and small.

  4. Geoff says:

    Really a strong career as career character actor now looking back on it – Aliens to Near Dark to One False Move to True Lies to Titanic to A Simple Plan…..Didn’t seem to have as many plum roles in the early ’00’s but NICE resurgence just a couple of years back with Edge of Tomorrow and Nightcrawler! RIP Hudson.

  5. Sideshow Bill says:

    I forgot he was in NIGHTCRAWLER. he was always great. As teen film geek I became obsessed with him after Aliens and Weird Science. He was a multi-talented guy. Even had a new wave band called Martini Ranch. And Frailty is fantastic, and it doesn’t hurt that it has a great Powers Boothe performance. I mentioned A Simple Plan in the other thread. That movie is so oddly overlooked considering the talent involved, and the quality. Raimi has never been more controlled.

    I feel like a part of my youth died with him today. I shed a few tears this morning. It really does hurt. Much like when Phillip Seymour Hoffman passed.

    RIP Bill. Thank you for everything.

  6. Mike says:

    Wasn’t he in porn before making it in real movies? I thought I read that somewhere. (Not that there’s anything wrong with that.)

  7. TrackerBacker says:

    Mike: No.

  8. Stella's Boy says:

    Only actor to ever be killed by an alien, predator, and terminator. He was such a treasure. This is bullshit.

  9. CG says:

    Damn shame. He was usually the most interesting thing on Big Love, even though he rarely had the biggest/showiest moments.

  10. Krazy Eyes says:

    A real shame. He as a very talented actor, director, and by many reports an all round decent guy.

    As a huge fan of Frailty, this news is especially tough since it was recently reported that Paxton was reteaming with Frailty scribe Brent Hanley on an adaptation of Joe Lansdale’s The Bottoms.

    And speaking of Hanley, WTF happened to him? Dude comes roaring out of the gate with such an exceptional debut screenplay and then “poof” nada for over a decade — unless you count that Masters of Horror. I’m guessing he’s making a living script doctoring or selling specs but damn.

  11. Sideshow Bill says:

    He was good on Big Love but I watched that for Harry Dean. They made good foils.

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“I always thought that once I had lived in Chicago for a while, it would be interesting to do a portrait of the city – but to do it at a significant time. Figuring out when would be the ideal time to do that was the trick. So when this election came around, coupled with the Laquan McDonald trial, it seemed like the ideal time to do the story. Having lived in Chicagoland for thirty-five-plus years and done a number of films here, I’ve always been struck by the vibrancy of the city and its toughness. Its tenderness too. I’ve always been interested in the people at the center of all the stories. This is a different film in that regard, because we’re not following a couple of individuals over the course of the project in the way that a lot of the films I’ve done have, but I still feel like people’s voices and aspirations and hopes are at the center of this series.

It wasn’t easy. We started back in July 2018, it was actually on the Fourth of July – that was our first shoot. It’s like most documentaries in that the further you go along the more involved and obsessed you get, and you just start shooting more and more and more. We threw ourselves into this crazy year in Chicago. We got up every day and tried to figure out if we should be out shooting or not, and what it is we should shoot. We were trying to balance following this massive political story of the mayor’s race and these significant moments like the Laquan McDonald trial with taking the pulse of people in the city that we encounter along the way and getting a sense of their lives and what it means to live here. By election day, Zak Piper, our producer, had something like six cameras out in the field. You could double-check that, it might have been seven. We had this organized team effort to hit all the candidates as they were voting, if they hadn’t already voted. We hit tons of polling places, were at the Board of Elections and then were at the parties for the candidates that we had been able to follow closely. Then of course, we were trying to make sure we were at the parties of the candidates who made it to the runoff. So, yeah, it was kind of a monster.”
~ Steve James On City So Real

“I really want to see The Irishman. I’ve heard it’s big brother Martin Scorsese’s masterpiece. But I really can’t find the time. The promotion schedule is so tight, there’s no opportunity to see a three and a half-hour movie. But I really want to see it. In 2017, right before Okja’s New York premiere, I had the chance to go to Scorsese’s office, which is in the DGA building. There’s a lovely screening room there, too, with film prints that he’s collected. I talked to him for about an hour. There’s no movie he hasn’t seen, even Korean films. We talked about what he’s seen and his past work. It was a glorious day. I’ve loved his work since I was in college. Who doesn’t? Anyone involved with movies must feel the same way.”
~ Bong Joon-ho