By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

PGA Nominations For 2016

The Producers Guild of America (PGA) announced today the motion picture nominations for the 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards. The categories are The Darryl F. Zanuck Award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures and The Award for Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures.

All 2017 Producers Guild Award winners will be announced on Saturday, January 28, 2017 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles. This year, the Producers Guild will present special honors to Tom Rothman (Milestone Award), James L. Brooks (Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television), Irwin Winkler (David O. Selznick Achievement Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures), the feature film Loving (Stanley Kramer Award), and Megan Ellison (Visionary Award).

The 2017 Producers Guild Awards Co-Chairs are Donald De Line and Amy Pascal.  Sponsors of this year’s event include: Buick, Official Automotive Partner of the Awards, Delta Air Lines, Official Airline Partner of the PGA and sponsor of the Visionary Award, and Wanda Studios. Last week, the PGA announced Producers Guild Awards nominations for the television series/specials, children’s programs, long-form television, sports programs, and digital series categories.

In 1990, the Producers Guild held the first-ever Golden Laurel Awards, which were renamed the Producers Guild Awards in 2002. Richard Zanuck and Lili Fini Zanuck took home the award for Best Produced Motion Picture for Driving Miss Daisy, establishing the Guild’s awards as a bellwether for the Oscars.

The 2017 Producers Guild Awards motion picture nominations are listed below in alphabetical order by category, along with eligible producers’ names.

The Darryl F. Zanuck Award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures:

·         Arrival

Producers: Dan Levine, Shawn Levy, Aaron Ryder, David Linde

 

·         Deadpool

Producers: Simon Kinberg, Ryan Reynolds, Lauren Shuler Donner

 

·         Fences

Producers: Scott Rudin, Denzel Washington, Todd Black

 

·         Hacksaw Ridge

Producers: Bill Mechanic, David Permut

 

·         Hell or High Water

Producers: Carla Hacken, Julie Yorn

 

·         Hidden Figures

Producers: Donna Gigliotti, Peter Chernin & Jenno Topping, Pharrell Williams, Theodore Melfi

 

·         La La Land

Producers: Fred Berger, Jordan Horowitz, Marc Platt

 

·         Lion

Producers: Emile Sherman & Iain Canning, Angie Fielder

 

·         Manchester By the Sea

Producers: Matt Damon, Kimberly Steward, Chris Moore, Lauren Beck, Kevin Walsh

 

·         Moonlight

Producers: Adele Romanski, Dede Gardner & Jeremy Kleiner

 

The Award for Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures:

 

·         Finding Dory

Producer: Lindsey Collins

 

·         Kubo and the Two Strings

Producers: Arianne Sutner, Travis Knight

 

·         Moana

Producer: Osnat Shurer

 

·         The Secret Life of Pets

Producers: Chris Meledandri, Janet Healy

 

·         Zootopia

Producer: Clark Spencer

 

The Award for Outstanding Producer of Documentary Theatrical Motion Pictures:

* The PGA previously announced the nominations in this category on November 22, 2016.  The list below has been updated to include eligible producers.

 

·         Dancer

Producer: Gabrielle Tana

 

·         The Eagle Huntress

Producers: Stacey Reiss, Otto Bell

 

·         Life, Animated

Producers: Julie Goldman, Roger Ross Williams

 

·         O.J.: Made in America

Producers:  Ezra Edelman, Caroline Waterlow

 

·         Tower

Producers:  Keith Maitland, Susan Thomson, Megan Gilbride

ABOUT THE PRODUCERS GUILD OF AMERICA (PGA)

The Producers Guild of America is the non-profit trade group that represents, protects and promotes the interests of all members of the producing team in film, television and new media. The Producers Guild has more than 7,500 members who work together to protect and improve their careers, the industry and community by providing members with employment opportunities, seeking to expand health benefits, promoting fair and impartial standards for the awarding of producing credits, as well as other education and advocacy efforts such as encouraging sustainable production practices.  For more information and the latest updates, please visit Producers Guild of America websites and follow on social media:

Websites: www.producersguild.orgwww.pgagreen.orgwww.pgadiversity.org

Twitter: @ProducersGuild

Facebook: www.facebook.com/pga

YouTube: www.youtube.com/producersguild

Instagram: www.instagram.com/producersguild

Hashtag: #PGAwards

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What do you make of the criticism directed at the film that the biopic genre or format is intrinsically bourgeois? That’s the most crazy criticism. That’s an excuse for not engaging with the content of the movie. Film critics sometimes, you know, can be very lazy.

Come on, formal criticism is valuable too. But I’m amazed when this is the thing they put in front of the discourse. My situation is that I’m dealing with a highly explosive subject, a taboo subject that nobody wants to deal with.

Karl Marx? Yes, this is the first film ever in the Western world about Marx. And I managed to make an almost mainstream film out of it. You want me at the same time to play the artist and do a risky film about the way my camera moves and the way I edit? No, it’s complicated enough! The artistic challenge — and it took me ten years with Pascal to write this story — was the writing. That was the most difficult part. We were making a film about the evolution of an idea, which is impossible. To be able to have political discourse in a scene, and you can follow it, and it’s not simplified, and it’s historically true. This is the accomplishment. So when someone criticizes the formal aspects without seeing that first, for me, it’s laziness or ignorance. There’s an incapacity to deal with what’s on the table. I make political films about today, I’m not making a biopic to make a biopic. I don’t believe in being an artist just to be an artist. And by the way, this film cost $9 million. I dare anyone in the United States to make this film for $9 million.
Raoul Peck on The Young Karl Marx

“The Motion Picture Academy, at considerable expense and with great efficiency, runs all the nominated pictures at its own theater, showing each picture twice, once in the afternoon, once in the evening. A nominated picture is one in connection with which any kind of work is nominated for an award, not necessarily acting, directing, or writing; it may be a purely technical matter such as set-dressing or sound work. This running of pictures has the object of permitting the voters to look at films which they may happen to have missed or to have partly forgotten. It is an attempt to make them realize that pictures released early in the year, and since overlaid with several thicknesses of battered celluloid, are still in the running and that consideration of only those released a short time before the end of the year is not quite just.

“The effort is largely a waste. The people with votes don’t go to these showings. They send their relatives, friends, or servants. They have had enough of looking at pictures, and the voices of destiny are by no means inaudible in the Hollywood air. They have a brassy tone, but they are more than distinct.”All this is good democracy of a sort. We elect Congressmen and Presidents in much the same way, so why not actors, cameramen, writers, and all rest of the people who have to do with the making of pictures? If we permit noise, ballyhoo, and theater to influence us in the selection of the people who are to run the country, why should we object to the same methods in the selection of meritorious achievements in the film business? If we can huckster a President into the White House, why cannot we huckster the agonized Miss Joan Crawford or the hard and beautiful Miss Olivia de Havilland into possession of one of those golden statuettes which express the motion picture industry’s frantic desire to kiss itself on the back of its neck? The only answer I can think of is that the motion picture is an art. I say this with a very small voice. It is an inconsiderable statement and has a hard time not sounding a little ludicrous. Nevertheless it is a fact, not in the least diminished by the further facts that its ethos is so far pretty low and that its techniques are dominated by some pretty awful people.

“If you think most motion pictures are bad, which they are (including the foreign), find out from some initiate how they are made, and you will be astonished that any of them could be good. Making a fine motion picture is like painting “The Laughing Cavalier” in Macy’s basement, with a floorwalker to mix your colors for you. Of course most motion pictures are bad. Why wouldn’t they be?”
~ Raymond Chandler, “Oscar Night In Hollywood,” 1948