By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

PGA Nominations For 2016

The Producers Guild of America (PGA) announced today the motion picture nominations for the 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards. The categories are The Darryl F. Zanuck Award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures and The Award for Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures.

All 2017 Producers Guild Award winners will be announced on Saturday, January 28, 2017 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles. This year, the Producers Guild will present special honors to Tom Rothman (Milestone Award), James L. Brooks (Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television), Irwin Winkler (David O. Selznick Achievement Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures), the feature film Loving (Stanley Kramer Award), and Megan Ellison (Visionary Award).

The 2017 Producers Guild Awards Co-Chairs are Donald De Line and Amy Pascal.  Sponsors of this year’s event include: Buick, Official Automotive Partner of the Awards, Delta Air Lines, Official Airline Partner of the PGA and sponsor of the Visionary Award, and Wanda Studios. Last week, the PGA announced Producers Guild Awards nominations for the television series/specials, children’s programs, long-form television, sports programs, and digital series categories.

In 1990, the Producers Guild held the first-ever Golden Laurel Awards, which were renamed the Producers Guild Awards in 2002. Richard Zanuck and Lili Fini Zanuck took home the award for Best Produced Motion Picture for Driving Miss Daisy, establishing the Guild’s awards as a bellwether for the Oscars.

The 2017 Producers Guild Awards motion picture nominations are listed below in alphabetical order by category, along with eligible producers’ names.

The Darryl F. Zanuck Award for Outstanding Producer of Theatrical Motion Pictures:

·         Arrival

Producers: Dan Levine, Shawn Levy, Aaron Ryder, David Linde

 

·         Deadpool

Producers: Simon Kinberg, Ryan Reynolds, Lauren Shuler Donner

 

·         Fences

Producers: Scott Rudin, Denzel Washington, Todd Black

 

·         Hacksaw Ridge

Producers: Bill Mechanic, David Permut

 

·         Hell or High Water

Producers: Carla Hacken, Julie Yorn

 

·         Hidden Figures

Producers: Donna Gigliotti, Peter Chernin & Jenno Topping, Pharrell Williams, Theodore Melfi

 

·         La La Land

Producers: Fred Berger, Jordan Horowitz, Marc Platt

 

·         Lion

Producers: Emile Sherman & Iain Canning, Angie Fielder

 

·         Manchester By the Sea

Producers: Matt Damon, Kimberly Steward, Chris Moore, Lauren Beck, Kevin Walsh

 

·         Moonlight

Producers: Adele Romanski, Dede Gardner & Jeremy Kleiner

 

The Award for Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures:

 

·         Finding Dory

Producer: Lindsey Collins

 

·         Kubo and the Two Strings

Producers: Arianne Sutner, Travis Knight

 

·         Moana

Producer: Osnat Shurer

 

·         The Secret Life of Pets

Producers: Chris Meledandri, Janet Healy

 

·         Zootopia

Producer: Clark Spencer

 

The Award for Outstanding Producer of Documentary Theatrical Motion Pictures:

* The PGA previously announced the nominations in this category on November 22, 2016.  The list below has been updated to include eligible producers.

 

·         Dancer

Producer: Gabrielle Tana

 

·         The Eagle Huntress

Producers: Stacey Reiss, Otto Bell

 

·         Life, Animated

Producers: Julie Goldman, Roger Ross Williams

 

·         O.J.: Made in America

Producers:  Ezra Edelman, Caroline Waterlow

 

·         Tower

Producers:  Keith Maitland, Susan Thomson, Megan Gilbride

ABOUT THE PRODUCERS GUILD OF AMERICA (PGA)

The Producers Guild of America is the non-profit trade group that represents, protects and promotes the interests of all members of the producing team in film, television and new media. The Producers Guild has more than 7,500 members who work together to protect and improve their careers, the industry and community by providing members with employment opportunities, seeking to expand health benefits, promoting fair and impartial standards for the awarding of producing credits, as well as other education and advocacy efforts such as encouraging sustainable production practices.  For more information and the latest updates, please visit Producers Guild of America websites and follow on social media:

Websites: www.producersguild.orgwww.pgagreen.orgwww.pgadiversity.org

Twitter: @ProducersGuild

Facebook: www.facebook.com/pga

YouTube: www.youtube.com/producersguild

Instagram: www.instagram.com/producersguild

Hashtag: #PGAwards

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