By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Globes 2016

BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
MOONLIGHT

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
ISABELLE HUPPERT
ELLE

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA
CASEY AFFLECK
MANCHESTER BY THE SEA

BEST MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
LA LA LAND
Marc Platt Productions / Impostor Pictures / Gilbert Films; Lionsgate

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
EMMA STONE
LA LA LAND

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
RYAN GOSLING
LA LA LAND

BEST MOTION PICTURE – ANIMATED
ZOOTOPIA
Walt Disney Animation Studios; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

BEST MOTION PICTURE – FOREIGN LANGUAGE
ELLE (FRANCE)
SBS Productions; Sony Pictures Classics

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN ANY MOTION PICTURE
VIOLA DAVIS
FENCES

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN ANY
MOTION PICTURE
AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON
NOCTURNAL ANIMALS

BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE
DAMIEN CHAZELLE
LA LA LAND

BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE
DAMIEN CHAZELLE
LA LA LAND

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE
JUSTIN HURWITZ
LA LA LAND

BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE
“CITY OF STARS”
LA LA LAND
Music by: Justin Hurwitz
Lyrics by: Benj Pasek, Justin Paul

BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA
THE CROWN
Left Bank Pictures in association with Sony Pictures Television; Netflix

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA
CLAIRE FOY
THE CROWN

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA
BILLY BOB THORNTON
GOLIATH

BEST TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
ATLANTA
FX Productions; FX

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
TRACEE ELLIS ROSS
BLACK-ISH

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – MUSICAL OR COMEDY
DONALD GLOVER
ATLANTA

BEST TELEVISION LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
THE PEOPLE v. O.J. SIMPSON: AMERICAN CRIME STORY
Fox 21 Television Studios and FX Productions; FX

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
SARAH PAULSON
THE PEOPLE v. O.J. SIMPSON: AMERICAN CRIME STORY

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR
TELEVISION
TOM HIDDLESTON
THE NIGHT MANAGER

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
OLIVIA COLMAN
THE NIGHT MANAGER

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES,
LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
HUGH LAURIE
THE NIGHT MANAGER

WINNERS BY MOTION PICTURE
DISTRIBUTOR AND TELEVISION
NETWORK

MOTION PICTURE DISTRIBUTOR
Lionsgate 7
Sony Pictures Classics 2
A24 1
Amazon Studios 1
Focus Features 1
Paramount Pictures 1
Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures 1
TELEVISION NETWORK
FX 4
AMC 3
Netflix 2
ABC 1
Amazon Video 1
WINNERS BY MOTION PICTURE
AND TELEVISION SERIES OR PROGRAM

MOTION PICTURE
La La Land 7
Elle 2
Fences 1
Manchester by the Sea 1
Moonlight 1
Nocturnal Animals 1
Zootopia 1

TELEVISION SERIES OR PROGRAM
The Night Manager 3
Atlanta 2
The Crown 2
The People v. O.J. Simpson:
American Crime Story
2
black-ish 1
Goliath 1

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“By the time the draft was completed, and passed on to my frequent collaborator, director Kathryn Bigelow, I’d written something quite unlike the singular focus and sole protagonists of The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty. The effort to make Detroit a mirror of the chaotic times led to an ensemble piece, quickly shifting between characters in a nesting doll of movies within movies, a riot film that gives way to racial horror-crime that switches to a courtroom drama, with several detours along the way into a band’s journey, the miseducation of rookie cops and the adventures of a pair of young women experimenting with sexual freedom. It was, in short, a lot of ground to cover in a single picture. But Kathryn was encouraging, and over the proceeding draft we collaborated closely to hone the themes and scope, while attempting to keep alive the spirit of a tough and untamed narrative.”
~ Mark Boal on researching and writing Detroit

What are we doing wrong?
“Well, first of all, by “we” I assume you mean the public, the public approach or the public discourse, which means the discourse that takes place in the media. And for the purposes of this discussion, let us imagine that the media is white and thus approaches the topic of race as if they (the white people) were the answer and them (the black people) were the question. And so, in the interest of fairness, they take their turn (having first, of course, given it to themselves) and then invite comment by some different white people and some similar black people. They give what purports to be simply their point of view and then everyone else gives their beside-the-point of view.

“The customary way for white people to think about the topic of race—and it is only a topic to white people—is to ask, How would it be if I were black? But you can’t separate the “I” from being white. The “I” is so informed by the experience of being white that it is its very creation—it is this “I” in this context that is, in fact, the white man’s burden. People who think of themselves as well intentioned—which is, let’s face it, how people think of themselves—believe that the best, most compassionate, most American way to understand another person is to walk a mile in their shoes. And I think that’s conventionally the way this thing is approached. And that’s why the conversation never gets anywhere and that’s why the answers always come back wrong and the situation stays static—and worse than static.”
~ Fran Lebowitz, 1997