By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Writers Guild West President Howard Rodman On Trump Attack On “Working Men And Women”

 

 

December 8, 2016

Chuck Jones is President of United Steelworkers Local 1999, which represents the workers of the Carrier plants in Indiana. This week he spoke out about the much-publicized deal to keep over a thousand jobs from moving to Mexico, calling it a promise “half-way delivered.” He pointed out a truer set of numbers: that even as Carrier would receive seven million dollars in tax breaks, 550 of his members would lose their livelihoods after all.

In retaliation the President-elect of the United States, Tweeting from his gilded apartment atop the tower that bears his name, lashed out yesterday at the union. He said its dues were too high. He blamed the workers themselves for the loss of jobs. And he attacked Jones by name. As a consequence Jones and his family are now on the receiving end of a torrent of hate. He was told “I better watch out for myself, and they know what kind of car I drive, that I better watch out for my kids.”

Whether we work in Culver City or Indianapolis, in writers rooms or on factory floors, we all of us have the right to fight for a better deal. We stand in solidarity with the members of Local 1999 and with their chosen leadership. And we will not stand in silence as a President-elect, soon a President, uses his vast powers to intimidate the working men and women of our republic.

In Solidarity,

Howard A. Rodman
President, WGAW

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“A shot is a story. A shot on its own should be a piece of a story. Which is why I talk a lot about watching films, even the films we’re working on, with the sound off. Just to analyze how the film works, because a film should work for an audience without any sound. The biggest problem I see is that someone may have a superficial understanding of what a shot is propositionally, but they don’t have an understanding of how all of these shots are part of a family that needs to connect, and so you’ll get something that’s like a sentence arranged poorly with six nouns in a row. That surprises me, because I think that’s something that can be learned. Some things can’t be, but that can. It’s a grammar. In a classroom I could walk somebody through the difference between a sequence in which the filmmaker has a deep understanding of how images connect, and someone who doesn’t. It’s not really an intellectual process. Some people are just born with it and are just sort of savants at that deep mathematical understanding of shot construction.  I’m better than I used to be, but there are some people I’m just never going to catch. Spielberg. His staging ability. I’m never going to catch him. But when you’re trying to figure out how to get better—I’m not competitive in the sense of looking around at other filmmakers and comparing myself to them. What I do have to think about in trying to navigate myself through a career is: what can I get better at, and what do I have that I can enhance that somebody else doesn’t have?”
~ Steven Soderbergh

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