By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Los Angeles Film Critics List 2016 Winners

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION
ANNOUNCE 2016 AWARD WINNERS

 

LOS ANGELES, DECEMBER 4, 2016 – “Moonlight” won for Best Picture of the Year, it was announced today by Claudia Puig, President of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association (LAFCA).

“It’s been an extraordinary year for movies. Moonlight was clearly loved by many in the group, but we also came up with a varied and diverse slate of winners in all our categories. Congratulations to all the winners. We look forward to seeing them at our awards dinner on January 14th,” said Puig, on this year’s awards.

The 42nd annual Los Angeles Film Critics Association awards ceremony will be held Saturday, January 14th at the InterContinental, Los Angeles. As previously announced, Shirley MacLaine will receive the 2016 Career Achievement Award.

Award winners are:

PICTURE: “Moonlight”
Runner-up: “La La Land”

DIRECTOR: Barry Jenkins, “Moonlight”
Runner-up: Damien Chazelle, “La La Land”

ACTOR: Adam Driver, “Paterson”
Runner-up: Casey Affleck, “Manchester by the Sea”

ACTRESS: Isabelle Huppert, “Elle” and “Things to Come”
Runner-up: Rebecca Hall, “Christine”

SUPPORTING ACTOR: Mahershala Ali, “Moonlight”
Runner-up: Issey Ogata, “Silence”

SUPPORTING ACTRESS: Lily Gladstone, “Certain Women”
Runner-up: Michelle Williams, “Manchester by the Sea”

SCREENPLAY: Efthymis Filippou and Yorgos Lanthimos, “The Lobster”
Runner-up: Kenneth Lonergan, “Manchester by the Sea”

ANIMATION: “Your Name”
Runner-up: “The Red Turtle”

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM:  “The Handmaiden”
Runner-up:  “Toni Erdmann”

DOCUMENTARY / NON-FICTION FILM: “I Am Not Your Negro”
Runner-up: “O.J.: Made in America”

NEW GENERATION: Trey Edward Shults and Krisha Fairchild, “Krisha”

FILM EDITING: Bret Granato, Maya Mumma, Ben Sozanski, “O.J.: Made in America”
Runner-up: Tom Cross, “La La Land”

CINEMATOGRAPHY: James Laxton, “Moonlight”
Runner-up: Linus Sandgren, “La La Land”

PRODUCTION DESIGN: Ryu Seong-hee, “The Handmaiden”
Runner-up: David Wasco, “La La Land”

MUSIC/SCORE: Justin Hurwitz, Benj Pasek, Justin Paul, “La La Land”
Runner-up: Mica Levi, “Jackie”

DOUGLAS E. EDWARDS INDEPENDENT/EXPERIMENTAL FILM/VIDEO: “The Illinois Parables,” from writer-director Deborah Stratman

SPECIAL CITATION: Turner Classic Movies, for preserving historic cinema and bringing it to a wider audience via FilmStruck

CAREER ACHIEVEMENT: Shirley MacLaine

Founded in 1975, The Los Angeles Film Critics Association (LAFCA) is comprised of Los Angeles-based, professional film critics working in the Los Angeles print and electronic media.  Each December, LAFCA members vote on the year’s Achievement Awards, honoring screen excellence on both sides of the camera. Plaques of recognition are then presented to winners during LAFCA’s annual awards ceremony, held in mid-January.

Aside from honoring each year’s outstanding cinematic achievements, LAFCA has also made it a point to look back and pay tribute to distinguished industry veterans with its annual Career Achievement Award, which is announced in October, as well as to look forward by spotlighting fresh, promising talent with its annual New Generation Award.  In addition, over the past three decades, LAFCA has sponsored and hosted numerous film panels and events and donated funds to various Los Angeles film organizations, especially where film preservation was concerned.  LAFCA members have also collectively been vocal about taking up causes they have felt passionate about, from drafting formal protests against censorship and colorization to lending their support to controversial films.

For a full list of voting members, visit: http://www.lafca.net/members.html

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“The worst thing that we have in today’s movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. It’s the destruction of our business. I have such respect and admiration for film criticism. When I was growing up film criticism was a real art. And there was intellect that went into that. And you would read Pauline’s Kael’s reviews, or some others, and that doesn’t exist anymore. Now it’s about a number. A compounded number of how many positives vs. negatives. Now it’s about, ‘What’s your Rotten Tomatoes score?’ And that’s sad, because the Rotten Tomatoes score was so low on Batman v Superman I think it put a cloud over a movie that was incredibly successful. People don’t realize what goes into making a movie like that. It’s mind-blowing. It’s just insane, it’s hurting the business, it’s getting people to not see a movie. In Middle America it’s, ‘Oh, it’s a low Rotten Tomatoes score so I’m not going to go see it because it must suck.’ But that number is an aggregate and one that nobody can figure out exactly what it means, and it’s not always correct. I’ve seen some great movies with really abysmal Rotten Tomatoes scores. What’s sad is film criticism has disappeared. It’s really sad.”
~ Brett Ratner Has A Sad

“The loss of a local newspaper critic is a real loss. People who know the local audience and know the local cultural scene are very important resources. You can’t just substitute the stuff that comes in from nowhere through syndication or the wire. I think at the same time, some of the newer outlets have really beefed up and improved their coverage and made room for criticism. The real problem is in the more specialized art forms — fine arts, classical music, dance and jazz, say. There is a real slowing of critical voices, partly because those art forms have smaller audiences. Newspapers and magazines can say that doesn’t get enough traffic, so we don’t have room for that. To me, that’s especially worrisome. This is the opposite of what newspapers are supposed to do, which is not to try to figure out what people are already interested in and recite that back to them, but to hopefully guide them to something that they should be interested in, connecting potential audiences with more interesting work.

“Then again, not everyone needs a critic. People have been going to movies for more than 100 years now, and probably the vast majority of those people have not read movie reviews or cared what critics thought. But there has always been an important subset that wants to know more, that wants to think about what they’ve seen and what they’re going to see, and wants someone to think along with. I think critics are important, not just as dispensers of consumer advice — though that’s certainly part of it, too — but as trusted voices and companions for people to argue with in your head when you’re going to movies or afterwards.”
~ A. O. Scott