By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Field of Vision and Firelight Media Producing Doc Shorts Series “Our 100 Days”

Initiative Will Commission and Distribute Short Films Series Reacting to 

Trump’s Election
December 14, 2016 – NEW YORK, NY – Today, Firelight Media and Field of Vision announce “Our 100 Days” a new initiative that will produce and distribute 10 short films to be released in 2017.Our 100 Days” will explore threats to U.S. democracy and the stories of its most vulnerable communities in the current highly polarized political climate. The filmmakers and subjects will be jointly chosen by Field of Vision Executive Producers Laura Poitras, AJ Schnack and Charlotte Cook along with Firelight Media EPs Loira Limbal, Stanley Nelson and Marcia Smith.
“We are proud to launch this initiative that aims to disrupt the march towards normalcy, because for many Americans, there can be no business as usual when extremism is on the rise,” Stanley Nelson, co-founder of Firelight Media.
“Our 100 Days” seeks compelling, investigative or character-driven shorts that address topics such as: political transition, rise in hate crimes, immigration, racial justice, threats to democratic institutions, gender equality, LGBTQ rights, criminal justice, surveillance, climate change and beyond. Filmmakers will be encouraged to examine the current experiences of vulnerable communities, the projected challenges they face, and ways they are adjusting to those challenges as the country enters a new and uncharted landscape.
“Projects can vary in scope but we are especially interested in rapid response pieces that capture this frightening moment in our country. We’ll accept pitches until February 28, 2017and are committed to a speedy greenlighting process,” Laura Poitras, co-creator of Field of Vision.
This inaugural round invites pitches exclusively from the Firelight Documentary Lab community and its diverse group of filmmakers. The initial request for proposals will go live at 10am at Monday, December 13, 2016. Field of Vision and Firelight will provide funding and production support to selected filmmakers. Films will be showcased on Field of Vision with additional distribution partners to be announced.  
“Our 100 Days” will be part of Field of Vision’s fourth season which will debut in 2017.
Firelight Media founder Stanley Nelson’s new film Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities will premiere in the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.
About Firelight Media
Firelight produces award-winning films that expose injustice, illuminate the power of community and tell a history seldom told. Firelight connects these films with concrete and innovative ways for diverse audiences to be inspired, educated, and mobilized into action. Firelight’s flagship program is the Documentary Lab, which supports emerging documentary filmmakers from diverse communities that advance underrepresented stories.
About Field of Vision
Co-created by Academy Award-winning filmmaker Laura Poitras, filmmaker AJ Schnack and curator & producer Charlotte Cook, Field of Vision is a filmmaker-driven documentary unit that commissions and creates original short-form nonfiction films about developing and on-going stories around the globe.
About First Look Media
First Look Media is a new-model media company devoted to supporting independent voices across all platforms, from fearless investigative journalism and documentary filmmaking to smart, provocative entertainment. Launched in 2013 by eBay founder and philanthropist Pierre Omidyar, First Look operates as both a studio and digital media company.

 

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