By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Field of Vision and Firelight Media Producing Doc Shorts Series “Our 100 Days”

Initiative Will Commission and Distribute Short Films Series Reacting to 

Trump’s Election
December 14, 2016 – NEW YORK, NY – Today, Firelight Media and Field of Vision announce “Our 100 Days” a new initiative that will produce and distribute 10 short films to be released in 2017.Our 100 Days” will explore threats to U.S. democracy and the stories of its most vulnerable communities in the current highly polarized political climate. The filmmakers and subjects will be jointly chosen by Field of Vision Executive Producers Laura Poitras, AJ Schnack and Charlotte Cook along with Firelight Media EPs Loira Limbal, Stanley Nelson and Marcia Smith.
“We are proud to launch this initiative that aims to disrupt the march towards normalcy, because for many Americans, there can be no business as usual when extremism is on the rise,” Stanley Nelson, co-founder of Firelight Media.
“Our 100 Days” seeks compelling, investigative or character-driven shorts that address topics such as: political transition, rise in hate crimes, immigration, racial justice, threats to democratic institutions, gender equality, LGBTQ rights, criminal justice, surveillance, climate change and beyond. Filmmakers will be encouraged to examine the current experiences of vulnerable communities, the projected challenges they face, and ways they are adjusting to those challenges as the country enters a new and uncharted landscape.
“Projects can vary in scope but we are especially interested in rapid response pieces that capture this frightening moment in our country. We’ll accept pitches until February 28, 2017and are committed to a speedy greenlighting process,” Laura Poitras, co-creator of Field of Vision.
This inaugural round invites pitches exclusively from the Firelight Documentary Lab community and its diverse group of filmmakers. The initial request for proposals will go live at 10am at Monday, December 13, 2016. Field of Vision and Firelight will provide funding and production support to selected filmmakers. Films will be showcased on Field of Vision with additional distribution partners to be announced.  
“Our 100 Days” will be part of Field of Vision’s fourth season which will debut in 2017.
Firelight Media founder Stanley Nelson’s new film Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities will premiere in the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.
About Firelight Media
Firelight produces award-winning films that expose injustice, illuminate the power of community and tell a history seldom told. Firelight connects these films with concrete and innovative ways for diverse audiences to be inspired, educated, and mobilized into action. Firelight’s flagship program is the Documentary Lab, which supports emerging documentary filmmakers from diverse communities that advance underrepresented stories.
About Field of Vision
Co-created by Academy Award-winning filmmaker Laura Poitras, filmmaker AJ Schnack and curator & producer Charlotte Cook, Field of Vision is a filmmaker-driven documentary unit that commissions and creates original short-form nonfiction films about developing and on-going stories around the globe.
About First Look Media
First Look Media is a new-model media company devoted to supporting independent voices across all platforms, from fearless investigative journalism and documentary filmmaking to smart, provocative entertainment. Launched in 2013 by eBay founder and philanthropist Pierre Omidyar, First Look operates as both a studio and digital media company.

 

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch