By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Field of Vision and Firelight Media Producing Doc Shorts Series “Our 100 Days”

Initiative Will Commission and Distribute Short Films Series Reacting to 

Trump’s Election
December 14, 2016 – NEW YORK, NY – Today, Firelight Media and Field of Vision announce “Our 100 Days” a new initiative that will produce and distribute 10 short films to be released in 2017.Our 100 Days” will explore threats to U.S. democracy and the stories of its most vulnerable communities in the current highly polarized political climate. The filmmakers and subjects will be jointly chosen by Field of Vision Executive Producers Laura Poitras, AJ Schnack and Charlotte Cook along with Firelight Media EPs Loira Limbal, Stanley Nelson and Marcia Smith.
“We are proud to launch this initiative that aims to disrupt the march towards normalcy, because for many Americans, there can be no business as usual when extremism is on the rise,” Stanley Nelson, co-founder of Firelight Media.
“Our 100 Days” seeks compelling, investigative or character-driven shorts that address topics such as: political transition, rise in hate crimes, immigration, racial justice, threats to democratic institutions, gender equality, LGBTQ rights, criminal justice, surveillance, climate change and beyond. Filmmakers will be encouraged to examine the current experiences of vulnerable communities, the projected challenges they face, and ways they are adjusting to those challenges as the country enters a new and uncharted landscape.
“Projects can vary in scope but we are especially interested in rapid response pieces that capture this frightening moment in our country. We’ll accept pitches until February 28, 2017and are committed to a speedy greenlighting process,” Laura Poitras, co-creator of Field of Vision.
This inaugural round invites pitches exclusively from the Firelight Documentary Lab community and its diverse group of filmmakers. The initial request for proposals will go live at 10am at Monday, December 13, 2016. Field of Vision and Firelight will provide funding and production support to selected filmmakers. Films will be showcased on Field of Vision with additional distribution partners to be announced.  
“Our 100 Days” will be part of Field of Vision’s fourth season which will debut in 2017.
Firelight Media founder Stanley Nelson’s new film Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities will premiere in the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.
About Firelight Media
Firelight produces award-winning films that expose injustice, illuminate the power of community and tell a history seldom told. Firelight connects these films with concrete and innovative ways for diverse audiences to be inspired, educated, and mobilized into action. Firelight’s flagship program is the Documentary Lab, which supports emerging documentary filmmakers from diverse communities that advance underrepresented stories.
About Field of Vision
Co-created by Academy Award-winning filmmaker Laura Poitras, filmmaker AJ Schnack and curator & producer Charlotte Cook, Field of Vision is a filmmaker-driven documentary unit that commissions and creates original short-form nonfiction films about developing and on-going stories around the globe.
About First Look Media
First Look Media is a new-model media company devoted to supporting independent voices across all platforms, from fearless investigative journalism and documentary filmmaking to smart, provocative entertainment. Launched in 2013 by eBay founder and philanthropist Pierre Omidyar, First Look operates as both a studio and digital media company.

 

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“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

“I’m an unusual producer because I control the destiny of a lot of the films I’ve done. Most of them are in perfect states of restoration and preservation and distribution, and I aim to keep them in distribution. HanWay Films, which is my sales company, has a 500-film catalogue, which is looked after and tended like a garden. I’m still looking after my films in the catalogue and trying to get other people to look after their films, which we represent intellectually, to try to keep them alive. A film has to be run through a projector to be alive, unfortunately, and those electric shadows are few and far between now. It’s very hard to go and see films in a movie house. I was always involved with the sales and marketing of my films, right up from The Shout onwards. I’ve had good periods, but I also had a best period because the film business was in its best period then. You couldn’t make The Last Emperor today. You couldn’t make The Sheltering Sky today. You couldn’t make those films anymore as independent films. There are neither the resources nor the vision within the studios to go to them and say, “I want to make a film about China with no stars in it.”Then, twenty years ago, I thought, “OK, I’m going to sell my own films but I don’t want to make it my own sales company.” I wanted it to be for me but I wanted to make it open for every other producer, so they don’t feel that they make a film but I get the focus. So, it’s a company that is my business and I’m involved with running it in a certain way, but I’m not seen as a competitor with other people that use it. It’s used by lots of different producers apart from me. When I want to use it, however, it’s there for me and I suppose I’m planning to continue making all my films to be sold by HanWay. I don’t have to, but I do because it’s in my building and the marketing’s here, and I can do it like that. Often, it sounds like I’m being easy about things, but it’s much more difficult than it sounds. It’s just that I’ve been at it for a long time and there’s lots of fat and security around my business. I know how to make films, but it’s not easy—it’s become a very exacting life.”
~ Producer Jeremy Thomas