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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

BYOB: Carrie Fisher

Carrie Fisher

7 Responses to “BYOB: Carrie Fisher”

  1. EtGuild2 says:

    I hate 2016. RIP you beautiful mess <3.

  2. Movieman says:

    Carrie Fisher first flew onto my radar in Hal Ashby’s zeitgeist masterpiece, “Shampoo.”
    In her few brief scenes as Lee Grant’s bitter, hyper-competitive teenage daughter, Fisher was tough as nails…and hysterically funny.
    Little did I know those same traits would define her persona–both onscreen and off–for many decades to come.
    I feel like I’ve lost a big sister.

  3. Geoff says:

    Very sad indeed – of course, most will remember her from the Star Wars films and her impact as a bad-ass yet feminine heroine in that series really can’t be diminished.

    But I LOVED her in When Harry Met Sally…she played the original “rom com best friend” but she did such a dazzling job at it, pretty much stole the movie and I’m surprised that she didn’t get as much attention for that role – Crystal, Ryan, and Kirby seemed to get all of the plaudits.

    And Postcards from the Edge which came out the next year was such a watchable/quotable movie – the dialogue is hyper-sharp and Mike Nichols directed it beautifully…..really under-seen pseudo classic in my opinion that got lost in the shuffle against an ABSURD deluge of mob dramas (Goodfellas, State of Grace, Miller’s Crossing, King of New York) that all seemingly came out at the same exact time (Fall 1990)! Wonderful meta-emotional scene near the end between Gene Hackman and Meryl Streep which also showed how high Fisher’s dialogue could soar with the best of actors delivering it.

    I wish I could have seen more of her writing reach the big screen….

  4. chris says:

    I really like the linked piece about her script doctor work. One other thing that didn’t get reported much is that she was a great speech writer. I believe she wrote many of Streep’s acceptance and presentation speeches for years.

  5. JS Partisan says:

    Geoff, we bicker a lot, but we agree on When Harry Met Sally. She’s awesome in that film. Overall though, she will be sorely missed. Fuck this year. Fuck it, in it’s eyes.

  6. Geoff says:

    Sure on this we can agree JS – I would have loved to have seen her in more comedies after that kick (I think her film just prior to that was The Burbs with Tom Hanks) but I guess she ended up doing more writing.

  7. Greg says:

    Probably the only star wars entry in internet history with 7 comments.

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