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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

BYOB: Carrie Fisher

Carrie Fisher

7 Responses to “BYOB: Carrie Fisher”

  1. EtGuild2 says:

    I hate 2016. RIP you beautiful mess <3.

  2. Movieman says:

    Carrie Fisher first flew onto my radar in Hal Ashby’s zeitgeist masterpiece, “Shampoo.”
    In her few brief scenes as Lee Grant’s bitter, hyper-competitive teenage daughter, Fisher was tough as nails…and hysterically funny.
    Little did I know those same traits would define her persona–both onscreen and off–for many decades to come.
    I feel like I’ve lost a big sister.

  3. Geoff says:

    Very sad indeed – of course, most will remember her from the Star Wars films and her impact as a bad-ass yet feminine heroine in that series really can’t be diminished.

    But I LOVED her in When Harry Met Sally…she played the original “rom com best friend” but she did such a dazzling job at it, pretty much stole the movie and I’m surprised that she didn’t get as much attention for that role – Crystal, Ryan, and Kirby seemed to get all of the plaudits.

    And Postcards from the Edge which came out the next year was such a watchable/quotable movie – the dialogue is hyper-sharp and Mike Nichols directed it beautifully…..really under-seen pseudo classic in my opinion that got lost in the shuffle against an ABSURD deluge of mob dramas (Goodfellas, State of Grace, Miller’s Crossing, King of New York) that all seemingly came out at the same exact time (Fall 1990)! Wonderful meta-emotional scene near the end between Gene Hackman and Meryl Streep which also showed how high Fisher’s dialogue could soar with the best of actors delivering it.

    I wish I could have seen more of her writing reach the big screen….

  4. chris says:

    I really like the linked piece about her script doctor work. One other thing that didn’t get reported much is that she was a great speech writer. I believe she wrote many of Streep’s acceptance and presentation speeches for years.

  5. JS Partisan says:

    Geoff, we bicker a lot, but we agree on When Harry Met Sally. She’s awesome in that film. Overall though, she will be sorely missed. Fuck this year. Fuck it, in it’s eyes.

  6. Geoff says:

    Sure on this we can agree JS – I would have loved to have seen her in more comedies after that kick (I think her film just prior to that was The Burbs with Tom Hanks) but I guess she ended up doing more writing.

  7. Greg says:

    Probably the only star wars entry in internet history with 7 comments.

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch