By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Alamo Drafthouse Sets Nationwide “Lightsaber Vigils” For Carrie Fisher

[PR] Fearless princess. Wry, quick-witted scribe. Hollywood icon. Yesterday we lost our beloved Carrie Fisher, and to honor her immense legacy, Alamo Drafthouse is inviting Jedis to join us for some special lightsaber vigils.
 
Here’s a list of Drafthouse locations where you can pay respects to the dearly-departed Ms. Fisher:
— Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar (Austin, TX) will be holding a special lightsaber vigil this evening (12/28) starting at 6:30PM CST (you can read more about what that will entail here).
— The Winchester Alamo Drafthouse (Winchester, VA) will hold a screening of
When Harry Met Sally on 12/31 at 10pm, to coincide with the New Year, and a memorial event will be launched around that screening.
— The Drafthouse in Omaha, NE will be holding two In Memoriam screenings:
The Burbs (1/5 at 7:30PM CST) and When Harry Met Sally (1/6 at 7PM CST). Tickets to both of those screenings will be on sale soon.
— Non-Austin Drafthouse locations in Texas (locations in New Braunfels, Stone Oak, Park North, Westlakes, and Laredo) will all be holding lightsaber vigils this evening (12/28) starting at 6:30PM CST (you can read more about what that will entail here).
— Additionally, our Park North (San Antonio), Laredo and Market Place (New Braunfels) locations will also be holding free memorial screenings of The Blues Brothers throughout the weekend. You can reserve your seat(s) with a $5 food and beverage voucher. These theaters will be accepting donations before and after the show to DBSA San Antonio, a non-profit support group for people with mood disorders, such as Bipolar Disorder and Depression (learn more about DBSA at www.dbsaalliance.org).
— Elsewhere in Texas: Houston’s Mason Park location will hold a lightsaber vigil at 6:45PM CST this Friday (12/30), while the Lubbock location will be holding their own lightsaber vigil on Friday, as well (7:00PM CST).
 
No lightsaber? Flashlights and glow sticks are also encouraged as we attempt to brighten the sky and say thank you to a woman who inspired us on and off the screen.
Stay tuned to the Alamo Drafthouse Twitter and Facebook pages for further updates.
May the Force be with you. Always.
Alamo Drafthouse Social Media:
Facebook:       facebook.com/AlamoDrafthouse
YouTube:         youtube.com/alamodrafthouse
Flickr:              flickr.com/alamodrafthouse
Instagram:       instagram.com/drafthouse
Pinterest:         pinterest.com/AlamoDrafthouse
Snapchat:        drafthousesnaps
Tim and Karrie League founded Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in 1997 as a single-screen mom and pop repertory theater in Austin.  Nineteen years later, the now 25-location chain has been named “the best theater in America” by Entertainment Weekly and “the best theater in the world” by Wired. The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema has built a reputation as a movie lover’s oasis not only by combining food and drink service with the movie-going experience, but also introducing unique programming and high-profile, star studded special events. Alamo Drafthouse Founder & CEO, Tim League, created Fantastic Fest, a world renowned film festival dubbed “The Geek Telluride” by Variety. Fantastic Fest showcases eight days of genre cinema from independents, international filmmakers and major Hollywood studios. The Alamo Drafthouse’s collectible art gallery, Mondo, offers breathtaking, original products featuring designs from world-famous artists based on licenses for popular TV and Movie properties including Star Wars, Star Trek & Universal Monsters. The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema is expanding its brand in new and exciting ways, including Drafthouse Films, founded in 2010, which has already garnered three Academy Award nominations and Birth.Movies.Death., an entertainment content platform for movie lovers and the pop culture obsessed.

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“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

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