By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Sony Pictures Classics Consummates Entire Almodóvar Film Library

 

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS ACQUIRES THE REST OF PEDRO ALMODÓVAR’S FILM LIBRARY AND DATES JULIETA FOR DECEMBER 21

NEW YORK (August 8, 2016) – Sony Pictures Classics announced today they have acquired the rest of Pedro  full library of films including PEPI, LUCI, BOM; LABYRINTH OF PASSION; DARK HABITS; WHAT HAVE I DONE TO DESERVE THIS?; HIGH HEELS and KIKA.  Additionally, Almodóvar’s 20th film, JULIETA, will be released in theaters on December 21.

 

The full library of films includes PEPI, LUCI, BOM; LABYRINTH OF PASSION; DARK HABITS; WHAT HAVE I DONE TO DESERVE THIS?; MATADOR; LAW OF DESIRE; WOMEN ON THE VERGE OF A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN; HIGH HEELS; KIKA; THE FLOWER OF MY SECRET; LIVE FLESH; ALL ABOUT MY MOTHER; TALK TO HER; BAD EDUCATION; VOLVER; BROKEN EMBRACES; THE SKIN I LIVE IN and I’M SO EXCITED!.

 

JULIETA, based on short stories by Nobel laureate Alice Munro, is about a mother’s struggle to survive uncertainty. It is also about fate, guilt complexes and that unfathomable mystery that leads us to abandon the people we love, erasing them from our lives as if they had never meant anything, as if they had never existed.  JULIETA has received acclaim for its rich storytelling and supreme design as well as great performances led by Adriana Ugarte, Emma Suárez and Rossy de Palma.  It debuted at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival.

 

ABOUT SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

Michael Barker and Tom Bernard serve as co-presidents of Sony Pictures Classics—an autonomous division of Sony Pictures Entertainment they founded with Marcie Bloom in January 1992, which distributes, produces, and acquires independent films from around the world.  Barker and Bernard have released prestigious films that have won 32 Academy Awards® (28 of those at Sony Pictures Classics) and have garnered 159 Academy Award® nominations (133 at Sony Pictures Classics) including Best Picture nominations for WHIPLASH, AMOURMIDNIGHT IN PARIS, AN EDUCATIONCAPOTE, HOWARDS END, AND CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON.

 

ABOUT SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT

Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) is a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, a subsidiary of Tokyo-based Sony Corporation. SPE’s global operations encompass motion picture production and distribution; television production and distribution; home entertainment acquisition and distribution; a global channel network; digital content creation and distribution; operation of studio facilities; development of new entertainment products, services and technologies; and distribution of entertainment in more than 142 countries. For additional information, go to http://www.sonypictures.com/.

 

One Response to “Sony Pictures Classics Consummates Entire Almodóvar Film Library”

  1. Daniella Isaacs says:

    No mention of “Tie Me Up, Tie Me Down!” That would be a key omission.

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“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

“I’m an unusual producer because I control the destiny of a lot of the films I’ve done. Most of them are in perfect states of restoration and preservation and distribution, and I aim to keep them in distribution. HanWay Films, which is my sales company, has a 500-film catalogue, which is looked after and tended like a garden. I’m still looking after my films in the catalogue and trying to get other people to look after their films, which we represent intellectually, to try to keep them alive. A film has to be run through a projector to be alive, unfortunately, and those electric shadows are few and far between now. It’s very hard to go and see films in a movie house. I was always involved with the sales and marketing of my films, right up from The Shout onwards. I’ve had good periods, but I also had a best period because the film business was in its best period then. You couldn’t make The Last Emperor today. You couldn’t make The Sheltering Sky today. You couldn’t make those films anymore as independent films. There are neither the resources nor the vision within the studios to go to them and say, “I want to make a film about China with no stars in it.”Then, twenty years ago, I thought, “OK, I’m going to sell my own films but I don’t want to make it my own sales company.” I wanted it to be for me but I wanted to make it open for every other producer, so they don’t feel that they make a film but I get the focus. So, it’s a company that is my business and I’m involved with running it in a certain way, but I’m not seen as a competitor with other people that use it. It’s used by lots of different producers apart from me. When I want to use it, however, it’s there for me and I suppose I’m planning to continue making all my films to be sold by HanWay. I don’t have to, but I do because it’s in my building and the marketing’s here, and I can do it like that. Often, it sounds like I’m being easy about things, but it’s much more difficult than it sounds. It’s just that I’ve been at it for a long time and there’s lots of fat and security around my business. I know how to make films, but it’s not easy—it’s become a very exacting life.”
~ Producer Jeremy Thomas