By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Mann, Pacino And De Niro Present HEAT at the Academy with Chris Nolan

ONLY AT THE ACADEMY:  MICHAEL MANN, AL PACINO AND ROBERT DE NIRO TOGETHER FOR “HEAT”

Director Christopher Nolan to Moderate Q&A

LOS ANGELES, CA – The Academy celebrates Michael Mann’s 1995 classic, “Heat,” on the big screen onWednesday, September 7, at 7:00 p.m. at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills with a new 4K DCP restoration.  Following the screening, Oscar® winners Pacino and De Niro, four-time Oscar nominee Mann and other cast and crew will reunite in a conversation moderated by Oscar nominee Christopher Nolan.

The crew of a fierce, professional thief (De Niro) and an obsessively driven LAPD detective (Pacino) are locked in deadly opposition as they vector towards each other.

Taking inspiration from his friend, Chicago Detective Charlie Adamson – who killed Neil McCauley in a shoot-out in 1963 – Mann built a twilight vision of Los Angeles.  With its range of complex characters, epic scale action and dazzling use of the city, “Heat” is as incendiary as it was 20 years ago.

HEAT
Written and Directed by Michael Mann
Produced by Michael Mann and Art Linson
Executive Producers Arnon Milchan and Pieter Jan Brugge
Director of Photography Dante Spinotti
Production Designer Neil Spisak
Film Editors Dov Hoenig, Pasquale Buba, William Goldenberg and Tom Rolf
Music by Elliot Goldenthal
Costume Designer Deborah L. Scott
Sound by Lee Orloff, Andy Nelson, Chris Jenkins and Doug Hemphill
Casting by Bonnie Timmermann
Cast: Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Val Kilmer, Tom Sizemore, Diane Venora, Amy Brenneman, Dennis Haysbert, Ashley Judd, Mykelti Williamson, Wes Studi, Ted Levine, William Fichtner, Natalie Portman, Tom Noonan, Kevin Gage, Hank Azaria, Susan Traylor, Kim Staunton and Jon Voight
Running time: 172 minutes
Format: “Heat” will be presented in a new 4K DCP, restored by Stefan Sonnenfeld (Company 3) and Michael Mann.

Click here for tickets and additional information.

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One Response to “Mann, Pacino And De Niro Present HEAT at the Academy with Chris Nolan”

  1. Peter says:

    Has anyone told Nolan this is a digital screening?

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