By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

A+E Blends Broadcast Film Critics’ Ass’n’s TV And Movie Awards

A+E NETWORKS EXPANDS PARTNERSHIP WITH THE BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION AND THE BROADCAST TELEVISION JOURNALISTS ASSOCIATION TO COMBINE ‘THE CRITICS’ CHOICE TELEVISION & MOVIE AWARDS’ INTO ONE UNFORGETTABLE SHOW

‘THE 21St ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS’ TO SIMULCAST LIVE ON A&E, LIFETIME AND LMN ON SUNDAY, JANUARY 17 AT 8 PM ET/PT

 New York, NY—September 30, 2015 — A+E Networks, home of “The Critics’ Choice Television Awards” and “The Critics’ Choice Movie Awards” for the past year, will combine the two shows into one star-studded three-hour event.  Together, the network and its continued partnership with the Broadcast Television Journalists Association (BTJA) and the Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) will showcase the achievements of some of the biggest names in television and film today. The announcement was made jointly today by Elaine Frontain Bryant, Executive Vice President of Programming for A&E, and Joey Berlin, BFCA/BTJA President. “The 21st Annual Critics’ Choice Awards” will air live on A&E, Lifetime and LMN on Sunday, January 17 at 8PM ET/PT immediately following a live Red Carpet show at 7PM ET/PT.

 

Last year’s movie and television award shows were hosted by Michael Strahan and Cat Deeley respectively, joined by the industry’s biggest stars. The host for this year’s combined award show will be announced at a later date.

 

“We are thrilled to bring the two Critics’ Choice Awards shows into one super-show,” said Berlin.  “At a time when there are so many great movies and television shows to choose from – and so many spectacular performances – it is logical, appropriate and useful for America’s leading film and television critics and reporters to collectively honor the best of the best at the start of the new year.  Bringing all these stars together in one room is going to create an incredible night of entertainment.”

 

“Combining the television and film communities within one telecast of ‘The Critics’ Choice Awards’ even further elevates this star-studded gala event,” said Frontain Bryant.  “We’re thrilled to be able to give viewers an up close look at so much talent together under one roof with this unique and enhanced awards show.”

 

“The Critics’ Choice Awards” are bestowed annually by the BFCA and BTJA to honor the finest in cinematic and television achievement. The BFCA is the largest film critics’ organization in the United States and Canada, representing almost 300 television, radio and online critics. BFCA members are the primary source of information for today’s film going public. BTJA is the collective voice of almost 100 journalists who regularly cover television for TV viewers, radio listeners and online audiences. Historically, “The Critics’ Choice Movie Awards” are the most accurate predictor of the Academy Award nominations.

 

“The 21st Annual Critics’ Choice Awards” will be produced by Bob Bain Productions and Berlin Entertainment.  BFCA/BTJA were represented by WME and Dan Black of Greenberg Traurig on this deal.

About BFCA/BTJA

The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) is the largest film critics organization in the United States and Canada, representing almost 300 television, radio and online critics. The Broadcast Television Journalists Association (BTJA) is a partner organization to the Broadcast Film Critics Association. BTJA includes TV, radio and Internet journalists who cover television on a regular basis. For more information, visit: www.CriticsChoice.com

 

About A&E

Now reaching more than 96 million homes, A&E is the home to quality original content that inspires and challenges audiences to BE ORIGINAL. A&E offers a diverse mix of uniquely immersive entertainment ranging from the network’s original scripted series, including “Bates Motel” and “Damien” to signature non-fiction franchises, including “Duck Dynasty,” “Wahlburgers” and “Storage Wars.” The A&E website is located at aetv.com. Follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/aetv and Facebook at facebook.com/AETV. For more press information and photography, please visit us at press.aenetworks.com.

 

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“But okay, I promise you now that if I ever retire again, I’m going to ensure that I can’t walk it back. I’ll post a series of the most disgusting, offensive, outrageous statements you can ever imagine. That way it will be impossible for me to ever be employed again. No one is going to take my calls. No one is going to want to be seen with me. Oh, it will be scorched earth. I will have torched everything. I’m going to flame out in the most legendary fashion.”
~ Steven Soderbergh

I feel strongly connected to young cinephile culture. The thing about filmmaking—and cinephilia—is that you can’t keep hanging out with your own age group as you get older. They drop off, move somewhere. You can’t put together a crew of sixty-somethings. It’s the same for cinephilia: my original set of cinephile friends are watching DVDs at home or delving into 1958 episodes of ‘Gunsmoke,’ something like that. The people who are out there tend to be young, and I happen to be doing the same thing still, so it’s natural that I move in their circles.

In terms of the filmmaking, there was a gear shift: my first movies focused on people around my age, and I followed them for three films. Until The Unspeakable Act, I was using the same actors, not because of an affinity for people at a specific age, but because of my affinity for the actors. I like to work with actors a second time, especially if I don’t feel confident casting a new film. But The Unspeakable Act was a different script, and I had to cast all new people. Even for the older roles, I couldn’t get the people I’d worked with before. But when it was over, the same thing happened: I wanted to work with Tallie again in the worst way, and I started the process all over again.

I think Rohmer did something similar around the time of Perceval and Catherine de HeilbronnHe developed new groups of people that he liked to work with. These gear shifts are natural. Even if you want to follow certain actors to the end of their life (which I kind of do) the variety of ideas that you generate makes it necessary to change. And once you’ve made the change, you’ve got all these new people around.”
~ Dan Sallitt