By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Academy Elects 2015-16 Board Of Governors

Runoff election required for Writers Branch

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced its newly elected 2015–16 Board of Governors.  A runoff election is required for the Writers Branch.

“I’m excited to welcome our four new governors to the Board and congratulate those who have been reelected,” said Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs.  “Our Board is made up of some of the most experienced and respected professionals in our industry, and we look forward to working with them on our ongoing goals of increasing member engagement and expanding the Academy’s outreach to our global film community.”

Those elected to the Board for the first time are Lois Burwell, Makeup Artists and Hairstylists Branch; Michael Giacchino, Music Branch; Rory Kennedy, Documentary Branch; and Daryn Okada, Cinematographers Branch.

Incumbent governors reelected to the Board include Jim Bissell, Designers Branch; Tom Hanks, Actors Branch; Kathleen Kennedy, Producers Branch; John Knoll, Visual Effects Branch; Bill Kroyer, Short Films and Feature Animation Branch; Michael Mann, Directors Branch; Scott Millan, Sound Branch; Deborah Nadoolman Landis, Costume Designers Branch; and Bernard Telsey, Casting Directors Branch.

Returning to the Board after a hiatus are governors Jim Gianopulos, Executives Branch; Marvin Levy, Public Relations Branch; and Carol Littleton, Film Editors Branch.

The balloting in the Academy’s Writers Branch produced a tie between candidates Larry Karaszewski and Billy Ray, necessitating a second polling of that branch.  Voting for the runoff election via online and paper ballots will beginThursday, July 16, and end Wednesday, July 22.  The Academy last held a runoff election in 2009 for the Directors Branch.

The Academy’s 17 branches are each represented by three governors, who may serve up to three consecutive three-year terms.  The Board of Governors directs the Academy’s strategic vision, preserves the organization’s financial health, and assures the fulfillment of its mission.

For a full list of Academy governors, click here.

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“I had this friend who was my roommate for a while. She seemed really normal in every way except that she wouldn’t buy shampoo. She would only use my shampoo. And after a year it’s like, “When are you going to buy your own shampoo?” It was her way of digging in her heels. It was a certain sense of entitlement, or a certain anger. It was so interesting to me why she wouldn’t buy her own fucking shampoo. It was like,“I’m gonna use yours.” It was coming from a place of “You have more money than me, I just know it”—whether I did or I didn’t. Or maybe she felt, “You have a better life than me,” or “You have a better room than me in the apartment.” It was hostile. And she was a really close friend! There was never any other shampoo and I knew she was washing her hair. And clearly I have a thing about shampoo, as we see in ‘Friends with Money.’ I had some nice shampoo. So I found that psychologically so interesting how a person can function normally in every way and yet have this aberrance—it’s like a skip in the record. It was a sense of entitlement, I think. I put that in Olivia’s character, too, with her stealing someone’s face cream.”
Nicole Holofcener

“When books become a thing, they can no longer be fine.

“Literary people get mad at Knausgård the same way they get mad at Jonathan Franzen, a writer who, if I’m being honest, might be fine. I’m rarely honest about Jonathan Franzen. He’s an extremely annoying manI have only read bits and pieces of his novels, and while I’ve stopped reading many novels even though they were pretty good or great, I have always stopped reading Jonathan Franzen’s novels because I thought they were aggressively boring and dumb and smug. But why do I think this? I didn’t read him when he was a new interesting writer who wrote a couple of weird books and then hit it big with ‘The Corrections,’ a moment in which I might have picked him up with curiosity and read with an open mind; I only noticed him once, after David Foster Wallace had died, he became the heir apparent for the Great American Novelist position, once he had had that thing with Oprah and started giving interviews in which he said all manner of dumb shit; I only noticed him well after I had been told he was An Important Writer.

“So I can’t and shouldn’t pretend that I am unmoved by the lazily-satisfied gentle arrogance he projects or when he is given license to project it by the has-the-whole-world-gone-crazy development of him being constantly crowned and re-crowned as Is He The Great American Writer. What I really object to is this, and if there’s anything to his writing beyond it, I can’t see it and can’t be bothered. Others read him and tell me he’s actually a good writer—people whose critical instincts I have learned to respect—so I feel sure that he’s probably a perfectly fine, that his books are fine, and that probably even his stupid goddamned bird essays are probably also fine.

“But it’s too late. He has become a thing; he can’t be fine.”
~ Aaron Bady