By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Academy Elects 2015-16 Board Of Governors

Runoff election required for Writers Branch

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced its newly elected 2015–16 Board of Governors.  A runoff election is required for the Writers Branch.

“I’m excited to welcome our four new governors to the Board and congratulate those who have been reelected,” said Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs.  “Our Board is made up of some of the most experienced and respected professionals in our industry, and we look forward to working with them on our ongoing goals of increasing member engagement and expanding the Academy’s outreach to our global film community.”

Those elected to the Board for the first time are Lois Burwell, Makeup Artists and Hairstylists Branch; Michael Giacchino, Music Branch; Rory Kennedy, Documentary Branch; and Daryn Okada, Cinematographers Branch.

Incumbent governors reelected to the Board include Jim Bissell, Designers Branch; Tom Hanks, Actors Branch; Kathleen Kennedy, Producers Branch; John Knoll, Visual Effects Branch; Bill Kroyer, Short Films and Feature Animation Branch; Michael Mann, Directors Branch; Scott Millan, Sound Branch; Deborah Nadoolman Landis, Costume Designers Branch; and Bernard Telsey, Casting Directors Branch.

Returning to the Board after a hiatus are governors Jim Gianopulos, Executives Branch; Marvin Levy, Public Relations Branch; and Carol Littleton, Film Editors Branch.

The balloting in the Academy’s Writers Branch produced a tie between candidates Larry Karaszewski and Billy Ray, necessitating a second polling of that branch.  Voting for the runoff election via online and paper ballots will beginThursday, July 16, and end Wednesday, July 22.  The Academy last held a runoff election in 2009 for the Directors Branch.

The Academy’s 17 branches are each represented by three governors, who may serve up to three consecutive three-year terms.  The Board of Governors directs the Academy’s strategic vision, preserves the organization’s financial health, and assures the fulfillment of its mission.

For a full list of Academy governors, click here.

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“Most of these women were in their early twenties. Most of them refused to go any further with him, but a few went to dinner, or to some sort of casting situation, or to someplace private… if the stories were just about some crazed sex addict who approaches thousands of women on the street trying to get laid, I wouldn’t be posting this now. I don’t want to be attacking every Hollywood douchebag who hits on countless women. That type of behavior isn’t cool, but I think it’s important to separate douchebaggery from any kind of sexual coercion. But the women I talked to who DID go someplace private with Toback, told stories that were worse than the women only accosted on the street… So I did what I could do in my impotent state – for over twenty years now, I’ve been bringing up James Toback every chance I could in groups of people. I couldn’t stop him, but I could warn people about him… I’ve been hoping the Weinstein/O’Reilly stuff would bring this vampire into the light (him and a couple others, frankly). So I was happy today to wake up to this story in the L. A. Times.”
~ James Gunn

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