By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

Academy Elects 2015-16 Board Of Governors

Runoff election required for Writers Branch

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced its newly elected 2015–16 Board of Governors.  A runoff election is required for the Writers Branch.

“I’m excited to welcome our four new governors to the Board and congratulate those who have been reelected,” said Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs.  “Our Board is made up of some of the most experienced and respected professionals in our industry, and we look forward to working with them on our ongoing goals of increasing member engagement and expanding the Academy’s outreach to our global film community.”

Those elected to the Board for the first time are Lois Burwell, Makeup Artists and Hairstylists Branch; Michael Giacchino, Music Branch; Rory Kennedy, Documentary Branch; and Daryn Okada, Cinematographers Branch.

Incumbent governors reelected to the Board include Jim Bissell, Designers Branch; Tom Hanks, Actors Branch; Kathleen Kennedy, Producers Branch; John Knoll, Visual Effects Branch; Bill Kroyer, Short Films and Feature Animation Branch; Michael Mann, Directors Branch; Scott Millan, Sound Branch; Deborah Nadoolman Landis, Costume Designers Branch; and Bernard Telsey, Casting Directors Branch.

Returning to the Board after a hiatus are governors Jim Gianopulos, Executives Branch; Marvin Levy, Public Relations Branch; and Carol Littleton, Film Editors Branch.

The balloting in the Academy’s Writers Branch produced a tie between candidates Larry Karaszewski and Billy Ray, necessitating a second polling of that branch.  Voting for the runoff election via online and paper ballots will beginThursday, July 16, and end Wednesday, July 22.  The Academy last held a runoff election in 2009 for the Directors Branch.

The Academy’s 17 branches are each represented by three governors, who may serve up to three consecutive three-year terms.  The Board of Governors directs the Academy’s strategic vision, preserves the organization’s financial health, and assures the fulfillment of its mission.

For a full list of Academy governors, click here.

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“I’ve been pleasantly surprised by how many recappers, while clearly over their heads, are baseline sympathetic to finding themselves routinely unmoored, even if that means repeating over and over that this is closer to “avant-garde art” than  normal TV to meet the word count. My feed was busy connecting the dots to Peter Tscherkassky (gas station), Tony Conrad (the giant staring at feedback of what we’ve just seen), Pat O’Neill (bombs away) et al., and this is all apposite — visual and conceptual thinking along possibly inadvertent parallel lines. If recappers can’t find those exact reference points to latch onto, that speaks less to willful ignorance than to how unfortunately severed experimental film is from nearly all mainstream discussions of film because it’s generally hard to see outside of privileged contexts (fests, academia, the secret knowledge of a self-preserving circle working with a very finite set of resources and publicity access to the larger world); resources/capital/access/etc. So I won’t assign demerits for willful incuriosity, even if some recappers are reduced, in some unpleasantly condescending/bluffing cases, to dismissing this as a “student film” — because presumably experimentation is something the seasoned artist gets out of their system in maturity, following the George Lucas Model of graduating from Bruce Conner visuals to Lawrence Kasdan’s screenwriting.”
~ Vadim Rizov Goes For It, A Bit

“On the first ‘Twin Peaks,’ doing TV was like going from a mansion to a hut. But the arthouses are gone now, so cable television is a godsend — they’re the new art houses. You’ve got tons of freedom to do the work you want to do on TV, but there is a restriction in terms of picture and sound. The range of television is restricted. It’s hard for the power and the glory to come through. In other words, you can have things in a theater much louder and also much quieter. With TV, the quieter things have to be louder and the louder things have to be quieter, so you have less dynamics. The picture quality — it’s fine if you have a giant television with a good speaker system, but a lot of people will watch this on their laptops or whatever, so the picture and the sound are going to suffer big time. Optimally, people should be watching TV in a dark room with no disturbances and with as big and good a picture as possible and with as great sound as possible.”
~ David Lynch