By Other Voices voices@moviecitynews.com

Larry Gross on the Passing of L. M. Kit Carson

Kit Carson’s passing really got me.

I knew him on and off for thirty years.

Definitely one of those rare guys in the film universe who danced to his own kind of music.

Never figured out Hollywood to Hollywood’s detriment. A terrific writer. I wished my stuff was as good as his.

David Holzman’s Diary, Paris, Texas, American Dreamer, Bottle Rocket, Breathless, all of which he contributed to substantially albeit in varying degrees, constitute an authentic track record. He also wrote an article on Hollywood’s New Wave for Esquire that was one of the few journalistic pieces to become part of the history it was covering.

Kit wasn’t easy. Lived deeper inside his own head than even the rest of us who live inside our own heads. He could disappear on you, and you didn’t know why. Was fairly quick to take offense. There was a disappointed kid there somewhere. That being said, he was consistently funny, smart, had fantastic artistic taste and judgment. Whatever time you had with him left you wishing you could find a way to have more. And now there won’t be any more. Sad.

One Response to “Larry Gross on the Passing of L. M. Kit Carson”

  1. Greg says:

    I loved him in RUNNING ON EMPTY. His scenes with Christine Lahti were something else. Magnificent acting chops as well……

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