By Other Voices voices@moviecitynews.com

Larry Gross on the Passing of L. M. Kit Carson

Kit Carson’s passing really got me.

I knew him on and off for thirty years.

Definitely one of those rare guys in the film universe who danced to his own kind of music.

Never figured out Hollywood to Hollywood’s detriment. A terrific writer. I wished my stuff was as good as his.

David Holzman’s Diary, Paris, Texas, American Dreamer, Bottle Rocket, Breathless, all of which he contributed to substantially albeit in varying degrees, constitute an authentic track record. He also wrote an article on Hollywood’s New Wave for Esquire that was one of the few journalistic pieces to become part of the history it was covering.

Kit wasn’t easy. Lived deeper inside his own head than even the rest of us who live inside our own heads. He could disappear on you, and you didn’t know why. Was fairly quick to take offense. There was a disappointed kid there somewhere. That being said, he was consistently funny, smart, had fantastic artistic taste and judgment. Whatever time you had with him left you wishing you could find a way to have more. And now there won’t be any more. Sad.

One Response to “Larry Gross on the Passing of L. M. Kit Carson”

  1. Greg says:

    I loved him in RUNNING ON EMPTY. His scenes with Christine Lahti were something else. Magnificent acting chops as well……

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“Yes, yes, yes. Now I am also the producer on Jean-Luc’s films, so I need to raise the money. Yes, there are two projects in preparation with the pretext of virtual reality. We are beginning with two approaches: we can either do or undo VR. Maybe we will undo it more than we do VR, because thinking about VR leads to the opposite of VR. Is there concrete imagination in virtual reality? For me, cinema is concrete imagination because it’s made with the real and uses it. VR, virtual reality, is totally the opposite of that, but it might be interesting to use this and then to destroy it. No, we’ll see, we’ll see. First, it’s just an idea of a beginning. There is a forest to cross, and we are just at the beginning of the forest. The first step is development. As they say in business, first there is development and research. We have to develop somehow an idea for the film; I won’t say a script, but to see what we can do with this system, and what we can undo with this system.”
~ Fabrice Aragno On Godard’s Next Projects

“Why put it in a box? This is the number one problem I have—by the way it’s a fair question, I’m not saying that—with this kind of festival situation is that there’s always this temptation to classify the movie immediately and if you look at it—and I’ve tried to warn my fellow jurors of this—directors and movie critics are the worst people to judge movies! Directors are always thinking, “I could do that.” Critics are always saying, “This part of the movie is like the 1947 version and this part…” And it’s like, “Fuck! Just watch the movie and try and absorb it and not compare it to some other fucking movie and put it in a box!” So I think the answer’s both and maybe neither, I don’t know. That’s for you to see and criticize me for or not.”
~ James Gray