By Other Voices voices@moviecitynews.com

Larry Gross on the Passing of L. M. Kit Carson

Kit Carson’s passing really got me.

I knew him on and off for thirty years.

Definitely one of those rare guys in the film universe who danced to his own kind of music.

Never figured out Hollywood to Hollywood’s detriment. A terrific writer. I wished my stuff was as good as his.

David Holzman’s Diary, Paris, Texas, American Dreamer, Bottle Rocket, Breathless, all of which he contributed to substantially albeit in varying degrees, constitute an authentic track record. He also wrote an article on Hollywood’s New Wave for Esquire that was one of the few journalistic pieces to become part of the history it was covering.

Kit wasn’t easy. Lived deeper inside his own head than even the rest of us who live inside our own heads. He could disappear on you, and you didn’t know why. Was fairly quick to take offense. There was a disappointed kid there somewhere. That being said, he was consistently funny, smart, had fantastic artistic taste and judgment. Whatever time you had with him left you wishing you could find a way to have more. And now there won’t be any more. Sad.

One Response to “Larry Gross on the Passing of L. M. Kit Carson”

  1. Greg says:

    I loved him in RUNNING ON EMPTY. His scenes with Christine Lahti were something else. Magnificent acting chops as well……

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“Don’t work with assholes. Ever. No matter what they’re offering, no matter what they bring to the table. If they’re the sort of person where the phone rings at 10 o’clock at night and you wince because you see that it’s them, then don’t do business with them. One asshole will ruin your life. I’ve managed my entire TV and filmmaking career to work with people I like and respect. If the point comes where I don’t like or respect someone, I don’t work with them anymore.”

– Anthony Bourdain

The Atlantic: You saw that the Academy Awards recently held up your 2001 acceptance speech as the Platonic ideal of an Oscar speech. Did you have a reaction?

Soderbergh: Shock and dismay. When that popped up and people started texting me about it, I said, “Oh, it’s too bad I’m not there to tell the story of how that took place.” Well. I was not sober at the time. And I had nothing prepared because I knew I wasn’t going to win [Best Director for Traffic]. I figured Ridley, Ang or Daldry would win. So I was hitting the bar pretty hard, having a great night, feeling super-relaxed because I don’t have to get up there. So the combination of a 0.4 blood alcohol level and lack of preparation resulted in me, in my state of drunkenness crossed with adrenaline surge. I was coherent enough to know that [if I tried to thank everyone], that way lies destruction. So I went the other way. There were some people who appreciated that, and there were some people who really wanted to hear their names said, and I had to apologize to them.
~ Steven Soderbergh