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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

BYOB: GotG

byob-guardians-650

11 Responses to “BYOB: GotG”

  1. Mariamu says:

    Will not have a chance to see at all this weekend. Can’t wait!

  2. Pete B. says:

    It was nice to see Jim Starlin get mentioned in the GotG credits. He created the characters of Drax and Gamora. For my money, his run on Warlock is some of the best comics ever produced.

  3. Kevin says:

    Best movie of the summer, in my opinion. I’ve seen it twice and I already want to see it again!

  4. Bodhizefa says:

    It’s been a while since I’ve seen a film with such a jazzed audience. I’ll have to see it again just to hear all the jokes and dialogue I missed from the crowd’s laughter and excitement. And it was well worth the audience adoration, too. Good on Gunn and the team as they put together a really fun film that will warrant multiple viewings. And bravo to Marvel/Disney for opening August up as a viable month for blockbusters instead of using it as a wasteland for the undercards of the summer.

  5. Geoff says:

    I enjoyed the movie and I have to admit that I really underestimated Marvel this time – I mean wow, it’s probably going to make over $250 million domestic at the minimum! Even though they probably spent as much as Sony did promoting Amazing Spiderman 2 (though Sony had a much easier sell which they TRULY botched), gotta give props to the Disney marketing department on this one……they did an exceptional job of selling these characters and making this seems less like a geek property than any one initially thought. Truly one of the best marketing jobs in recent years.

  6. Geoff says:

    And yeah the audience I saw completely ate it up….Dave, there’s no way you can be dismissive of these numbers, so don’t even try. 😉 And yeah from the looks of it, the movie probably cost over $200 million with not much less spent on marketing, so they’ll need overseas numbers to even approach profit, but……they took a truly niche property, even more niche than Kick-Ass or Firefly, and just blew it up into something huge. Gotta give props.

  7. doug r says:

    I think they learned something from Hitchhiker’s. I was kinda sad there was no sequel to that, but I think it made them more likely to make this.

  8. SamLowry says:

    I, too, am bummed that we didn’t get a Hitchhiker’s sequel, yet just days ago when someone said “We wouldn’t eat animals that talk!” I shot back “You haven’t seen ‘Restaurant at the End of the Universe’, have you?”

    (In the TV adaptation, Peter Davison, the newly announced fifth Doctor, played the Dish of the Day, a talking bovine that not only desired to be eaten, but was quite capable of describing to diners which parts of him would be especially tasty.)

    “Better than eating an animal that doesn’t want to be eaten.”

  9. SamLowry says:

    Ut-oh, looks like someone ripped off one of my favorite movies of the ’80s.

    (If I wasn’t already calculating how many times I might have to sell plasma this month to pay the rent, I would’ve gone to see it in a theater already and found this out myself.)

  10. Bulldog68 says:

    True story, took my daughters, ages 13, 11, and 9 and the 9 year old was seated next to my wife. During a pivotal scene she blurted out for all the theatre to hear, “Mommy, what’s a prick?”

    At another moment both my older daughters, whom I was seated between asked, “Daddy, I don’t get it. What does he mean about the Jackson Pollock painting?”

    Loved it.

  11. SamLowry says:

    Quite hard to find one quote that stands out above the rest in 4 Things That Must Happen to Keep Marvel Movies Awesome, so let’s try this one:

    “Between this and Avatar, Zoe Saldana is turning into a less pretentious Andy Serkis.”

    …or maybe

    “They could get a Black Widow movie out well before 2017, and not only would we all go see it, it’d keep Scarlett Johansson from making movies like Lucy. They can probably get a tax break for that kind of disaster prevention work, right?”

    Yet I completely disagree with point #1 (“Kill Captain America”), since his only reason seems to be that he wants someone else to play Cap–maybe so Chris Evans can go back to playing the Human Torch?

    (And I really have nothing to add to the Robin Williams topic aside from pointing out that he played the worst lit teacher imaginable, so I’d better not post it over there lest it detract from the solemnity.)

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“When Bay keeps these absurd plot-gears spinning, he’s displaying his skill as a slick, professional entertainer. But then there are the images of motion—I hesitate to say, of things in motion, because it’s not clear how many things there are in the movie, instead of mere digital simulations of things. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that there’s a car chase through London, seen from the level of tires, that could have gone on for an hour, um, tirelessly. What matters is that the defenestrated Cade saves himself by leaping from drone to drone in midair like a frog skipping among lotus pads; that he and Vivian slide along the colossal, polished expanses of sharply tilting age-old fields of metal like luge Olympians. What matters is that, when this heroic duo find themselves thrust out into the void of inner space from a collapsing planet, it has a terrifyingly vast emptiness that Bay doesn’t dare hold for more than an instant lest he become the nightmare-master. What matters is that the enormous thing hurtling toward Earth is composed in a fanatical detail that would repay slow-motion viewing with near-geological patience. Bay has an authentic sense of the gigantic; beside the playful enormity of his Transformerized universe, the ostensibly heroic dimensions of Ridley Scott’s and Christopher Nolan’s massive visions seem like petulant vanities.”
~ Michael Bay Gives Richard Brody A Tingle

How do you see film evolving in this age of Netflix?

I thought the swing would be quicker and more violent. There have been two landmark moments in the history of French film. First in 1946, with the creation of the CNC under the aegis of Malraux. He saved French cinema by establishing the advance on receipts and support fund mechanisms. We’re all children of this political invention. Americans think that the State gives money to French films, but they’re wrong. Through this system, films fund themselves!

The other great turning point came by the hand of Jack Lang in the 1980s, after the creation of Canal+. While television was getting ready to become the nemesis of film, he created the decoder, and a specific broadcasting space between film and television, using new investments for film. That once again saved French film.

These political decisions are important. We’re once again facing big change. If our political masters don’t take control of the situation and new stakeholders like Netflix, Google and Amazon, we’re headed for disaster. We need to create obligations for Internet service providers. They can’t always be against film. They used to allow piracy, but now that they’ve become producers themselves, they’re starting to see things in a different light. This is a moment of transition, a strong political act needs to be put forward. And it can’t just be at national level, it has to happen at European level.

Filmmaker Cédric Klapisch