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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Trailer: Out Of Print

The film is about the New Beverly revival house in Los Angeles and the future of film.

6 Responses to “Trailer: Out Of Print”

  1. cadavra says:

    Wow! I’m in this! How very cool. :-)

  2. Kevin says:

    No mention of Tarantino?

  3. Jeffrey Boam's Doctor says:

    Very weird Tarantino is not in this. Not only is he the directors boss, he’s the obvious A lister apart from Nolan to talk to about digital takeover.

  4. berg says:

    I haven’t seen the film but just because he’s not in the trailer doesn’t mean he isn’t in the film

  5. cadavra says:

    The IMDb does not list him in the cast. It’s possible he declined to appear precisely because he owns the building. Not much of a reason, I grant you, but what else could it be? Certainly not modesty, and this was shot over a long period of time, so he must have been in town at some point.

  6. Jason Kelly says:

    Hi David,

    Got an award winning filmmaker eager to chat with you (u r DP/30 David Poland, right?).

    Pls contact me if you r: scott-jamesagency@att.com

    Thanks.

    Jason Kelly
    Literary Agent
    Scott-James Talent Agency

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

“The sad and painful truth is that pretty much everyone in this town knew who Harvey was. I have had long talks with my most liberal friends. Did we know he was a rapist? We didn’t. But did we know that for decades he has been offering actresses big careers in exchange for sexual favors? Yes, we did — and make no mistake, that is its own kind of rape. And did we all — or did any of us — refuse to do business with him on moral grounds? No. We ALL STAYED IN BUSINESS WITH HIM. I have never done business with Harvey but I can tell you with certainty that I would have — because I was recently approached by a film festival he sponsors. They asked me to submit my short film for their consideration and I did it without thinking twice. I am a dyed-in-the-wool feminist and a vocal one at that. So why didn’t I think twice? Because this entire town is built on the ugly principals that Harvey takes to an horrific extreme. If I didn’t work with people whose behavior I find reprehensible, I wouldn’t have a career.”
~ Showrunner Krista Vernoff

From AMPAS president John Bailey:

Dear Fellow Academy Members,

Danish director Carl Dreyer’s 1928 film “The Passion of Joan of Arc” is not only one of the visual landmarks of the silent era, but is a deeply disturbing portrait of a young woman’s persecution in the face of the male judges and priests of the ruling order. The actress Maria Falconetti gave one of the most profoundly affecting performances in the history of cinema as the Maid of Orleans.

Since the decision of the Academy’s Board of Governors on Saturday October 14 to expel producer Harvey Weinstein from its membership, I have been haunted not only by the recurring image of Falconetti and the sad arc of her career (dying in Argentina in 1946, reputedly from a crash diet) but of Joan’s refusal to submit to an auto de fe recantation of her beliefs.

Recent public testimonies by some of filmdom’s most recognized women regarding sexual intimidation, predation, and physical force is, clearly, a turning point in the film industry—and hopefully in our country, where what happens in the world of movies becomes a marker of societal Zeitgeist. Their decision to stand up against a powerful, abusive male not only parallels the cinema courage of Falconetti’s Joan but gives all women courage to speak up.

After Saturday’s Board of Governors meeting, the Academy issued a passionately worded statement, expressing not only our concern about harassment in the film industry, but our intention to be a strong voice in changing the culture of sexual exploitation in the movie business, already common well before the founding of the Academy 90 years ago. It is up to all of us Academy members to more clearly define for ourselves the parameters of proper conduct, of sexual equality, and respect for our fellow artists throughout our industry. The Academy cannot, and will not, be an inquisitorial court, but we can be part of a larger initiative to define standards of behavior, and to support the vulnerable women and men who may be at personal and career risk because of violations of ethical standards by their peers.

Yours,
John