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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

George Miller… Max Is Back (trailer… and also, a 2011 DP/30 with Dr. Miller)

6 Responses to “George Miller… Max Is Back (trailer… and also, a 2011 DP/30 with Dr. Miller)”

  1. Bulldog68 says:

    The remakes of of our favorite movies have been so underwhelming but the trailer looks really well done. Hope the movie delivers. The landscape looks beautifully shot and seems to be true character of the movie.

  2. amblinman says:

    The difference with this remake is the original filmmaker is involved. George Miller is a genius and I wish he had been more prolific in his career. He deserved Spielberg/Cameron levels of success and acclaim.

    Of course good or bad this film will probably be ignored by the American public as it has no Transformers or superheroes in it.

  3. The Pope says:

    I have hopes for this film. I really enjoyed the first two films as a teenager but… while I know they’re selling to the action/Mad Max audience I get the feeling from the trailer that there is little to nothing else there. Theron looks incredible. Hardy is always a charismatic draw. But I beleive if there was a big emotional/thematic hook they would have placed it in the trailer. But what we get is 2.44 of repeated imagery. Great imagery, but it is on repeat.

    Like I said, I have hopes for this film. I really do.

  4. leahnz says:

    er why does nobody have an astraaain accent mate? i don’t get it, when does this take place, can’t be after silly Thunderdome so after Mad Max and before II or after II but before he spins the wheel and makes a deal with tina turner? or is it just reboot city? (does Miller explain this in the vid, i can watch it now — i was kind of hoping this one would be the feral kid grown up, taking over max’s mantle rather than a redo of max himself, which seems bizarre)

    hard to tell just from a trailer but it looks too overblown and operatic, why do the older grey-haired dudes tend to come down with RSS (Ridley Scott Syndrome) and go all ott and melodrama bombastic instead of lean and mean like a fighting machine

  5. Chris says:

    “The difference with this remake is the original filmmaker is involved.”

    Then how do you explain Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, Star Wars eps I – III, Blues Brothers 2000, Rocky V, The Godfather Part III, etc etc?

    Plus this ain’t a remake, definitely more of a sequel.

    Still, this trailer is wild. I hope the movie is good.

  6. doug r says:

    I heard tell it’s set between the end of 1 and the start of 2.

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