By The Daily Buzz davidpoland@sbcglobal.net

The Daily Buzz podcast from South By Southwest (3/8/14)

thedailybuzz_sxsw14

Today’s Show Rundown, March 8, 2014

HOT TOPICS/TEXAS ROUNDTABLE
Kim Voynar/MOVIECITYNEWS
Eric Kohn/INDIEWIRE
Dave Karger/FANDANGO
Marjorie Baumgarten/AUSTIN CHRONICLE
Michael Tully/HAMMER TO NAIL
Holly Herrick/AUSTIN FILM SOCIETY
Joe Leydon/VARIETY
Jette Kernion/SLACKERWOOD.COM

INTERVIEW SEGMENT
Jason Bateman/BAD WORDS

UTAH at SXSW ROUNDTABLE
Hoby Darling/SKULLCANDY
Judy Robinett/JROBINETT ENTERPRISES
Deirdra Burgess/JROBINETT ENTERPRISES

DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKER SEGMENT
Michael Obert/SONG FROM THE FOREST
Alexandre Tondowski/SONG FROM THE FOREST

INTERVIEW SEGMENT
Larry Levine/WILD CANARIES
Sophia Takai/WILD CANARIES

NARRATIVE SPOTLIGHT
Bryan Reisberg/BIG SIGNIFICANT THINGS
Harry Lloyd/BIG SIGNIFICANT THINGS

EVOLUTION OF SX
David Madgael/DAVID MAGDAEL & ASSOCIATES
Irene Cho/DAILY BUZZ
Kim Voynar/MOVIECITYNEWS

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“One of my favorite things in watching any performance on film is when there isn’t a lot of cutting going on and when you get a chance to become really absorbed in the artist in hand. The same way we do, hopefully, at a concert, when we get a chance to really trip in to something that’s happening on stage. Whether the singer’s singing, or one of the other musicians is playing, we sort of stay there instead of cutting round with our eyes a lot.”
~ Jonathan Demme

“We’ve talked about this before in the past, my obsession with the Shakespearean histories having the ideal combination of the sweet and the sour. In ‘Henry IV, Part II’ which we’ve discussed before, in the end of that story it’s very complex and haunting because Prince Hal becomes Henry the King, and he has transcended his hoodlum days and at the ceremony is Falstaff, his good friend with whom he has really fucked around and been a loser with, and Falstaff comes up to him and says, ‘Now that you’re king we can really party,’ and the king famously says, ‘I know thee not, old man.’ It becomes Henry IV’s anointment and Falstaff’s catastrophe. That’s life. I have experienced very little unfettered triumph. There are moments, such as when my children are born, but even that comes with new fears and anxieties. In a sense the better you can communicate that life is both at once, the more powerful over time something becomes. One strives for something where the threads are there because it lasts in way that is very palpable. The idea of a tragedy is powerful in literature and theater, but in cinema it doesn’t work, certainly not commercially, and less so critically. Why is that? I think it has to do with how movies are so close to us.”
~ James Gray