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David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Great Moments in Sam Jackson (Not So Great For Sam Rubin)

Rubin apology after the jump…


8 Responses to “Great Moments in Sam Jackson (Not So Great For Sam Rubin)”

  1. EtGuild2 says:

    This makes me want to revisit your awesome Django DP/30. You need to give a seminar on how to interview Samuel L. Jackson.

  2. Spassky says:

    God bless Sam L. Jackson for handling this so well.

    This Sam Rubin fella needs to get his stupid hack cracker ass back to San Diego for the rest of his life. JEEEZUS. fuck that guy.

    EDIT: Russia, send Sam Rubin to Russia. I like San Diego, I think.

  3. YancySkancy says:

    The funny thing is, Sam Jackson WAS in a Super Bowl ad — the one for CAPTAIN AMERICA 2. I suppose it’s possible that whoever provided Rubin with the questions intended it to be about that ad, but if so, Rubin must have been unaware or he wouldn’t have apologized. He would’ve just said, “Calm down, dude; I meant your movie trailer.” I’m a little surprised though that Jackson’s answer wasn’t “Which ad? Oh, you mean for the movie?”

  4. Jermsguy says:

    In case you’ve forgotten why Sam Jackson is cool…

  5. glamourboy says:

    Cool??? I think it shows why Sam Jackson is a dick. People make mistakes. There was no reason for SJ to take Rubin over the coals. Perhaps your definition of cool is using your power and celebrity to humiliate someone in public…but it is not mine.

  6. Sam says:

    SLJ didn’t “take Rubin over the coals,” at least in a malicious way. It was a bunch of good natured and ultimately harmless ribbing. No big deal.

    I thought Rubin handled the aftermath of his error well too.

  7. cadavra says:

    No, Glamourboy is correct. Jackson dragged it out well past the point where it was funny to become borderline nasty. I remember the year after INDEPENDENCE DAY, no less than Roger Ebert on the Oscar Red Carpet asked a young woman, “And who are you?” She replied, “Vivica A. Fox. I’m in INDEPENDENCE DAY.” He blushed, apologized profusely, she smiled and accepted it. And that was the end of it. Bottom line: It can happen to anybody. Jackson needed to let it go long before he did. Rubin made an innocent mistake and was treated like he was about to light up a cross.

  8. YancySkancy says:

    Yeah, that last look on Jackson’s face doesn’t look too good natured. I still think it’s odd that Jackson said “Which ad?” instead of “Oh, the Captain America ad?” Someone said on Ken Levine’s blog that they actually showed the Cap trailer right before the interview, but I haven’t seen that part, so I don’t know. Rubin does mention Marvel in his first sentence though. I think it’s quite possible Rubin was just ill-prepared and didn’t even know what he was asking about.

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