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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride

2013 FYC Screenplays: 34 Available On 12/24/13


All Is Lost (J. C. Chandor)
The Armstrong Lie (Alex Gibney; transcript)
August: Osage County (Tracy Letts)
Before Midnight (Richard Linklater & Ethan Hawke & Julie Delpy)
The Bling Ring (Sofia Coppola)
The Butler (Danny Strong)
The Croods (Kirk DeMicco & Chris Sanders)
Dallas Buyers Club (Craig Borton, Melisa Wallack)
Despicable Me 2 (Cinco Paul & Ken Daurio)
Enough Said (Nicole Holofcener)
42 (Brian Helgeland)
Frozen (Jennifer Lee)
Fruitvale Station (Ryan Coogler)
Gravity (Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón)
The Great Gatsby (Baz Luhrmann & Craig Pearce)
The Invisible Woman
 (Abi Morgan)
Kill Your Darlings (John Krokidas & Austin Bunn)
Lone Survivor (Peter Berg)
Monsters University (Daniel Gerson & Robert L. Baird)
Mud (Jeff Nichols)
Nebraska (Robert W. Nelson)
One Chance (Justin Zackham)
The Past (Asghar Farhadi)
Philomena (Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope)
The Place Beyond The Pines (Derek Cianfrance & Ben Coccio & Darius Marder) (With: an interactive map to its Schenectady locations)
Prisoners (Aaron Guzikowski)
Rush (Peter Morgan)
Saving Mr. Banks(Kelly Marcel and Sue Smith)
The Spectacular Now (Scott Neustadter & Michael H. Weber)
Spring Breakers (Harmony Korine)
12 Years A Slave (John Ridley)
 (Haifaa Al Mansour)
The Way, Way Back (Faxon & Rash)
The Wolf Of Wall Street (Terence Winter)

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“Roger Ebert claimed that the re-editing of The Brown Bunny after Cannes allowed him a difference of opinion so vast that he first called it the worst film in history and eventually gave it a thumbs up. This is both far fetched and an outright lie. The truth is, unlike the many claims that the unfinished film that showed at Cannes was 24 minutes shorter than the finished film, it was only 8 minutes shorter. The running time I filled out on the Cannes submission form was arbitrary. The running time I chose was just a number I liked. I had no idea where in the process I would actually be when I needed to stop cutting to meet the screening deadline. So whatever running time was printed in the program, I promise you, was not the actual running time. And the cuts I made to finish the film after Cannes were not many. I shortened the opening race scene once I was able to do so digitally. After rewatching the last 4 minutes of the film over and over again, somewhere within those 4 minutes, I froze the picture and just ended the film there, cutting out everything after that point, which was about 3 minutes. Originally in the salt flats scene, the motorcycle returned from the white. I removed the return portion of that shot, which seemed too literal. And I cut a scene of me putting on a sweater. That’s pretty much it. Plus the usual frame here, frame there, final tweaks. If you didn’t like the unfinished film at Cannes, you didn’t like the finished film, and vice versa. Roger Ebert made up his story and his premise because after calling my film literally the worst film ever made, he eventually realized it was not in his best interest to be stuck with that mantra. Stuck with a brutal, dismissive review of a film that other, more serious critics eventually felt differently about. He also took attention away from what he actually did at the press screening. It is outrageous that a single critic disrupted a press screening for a film chosen in main competition at such a high profile festival and even more outrageous that Ebert was ever allowed into another screening at Cannes. His ranting, moaning and eventual loud singing happened within the first 20 minutes, completely disrupting and manipulating the press screening of my film. Afterwards, at the first public screening, booing, laughing and hissing started during the open credits, even before the first scene of the film. The public, who had heard and read rumors about the Ebert incident and about me personally, heckled from frame one and never stopped. To make things weirder, I got a record-setting standing ovation from the supporters of the film who were trying to show up the distractors who had been disrupting the film. It was not the cut nor the film itself that drew blood. It was something suspicious about me. Something offensive to certain ideologues.”
~ Vincent Gallo

“I think [technology has[ its made my life faster, it’s made the ability to succeed easier. But has that made my life better? Is it better now than it was in the eighties or seventies? I don’t think we are happier. Maybe because I’m 55, I really am asking these questions… I really want to do meaningful things! This is also the time that I really want to focus on directing. I think that I will act less and less. I’ve been doing it for 52 years. It’s a long time to do one thing and I feel like there are a lot of stories that I got out of my system that I don’t need to tell anymore. I don’t need to ever do The Accused again! That is never going to happen again! You hit these milestones as an actor, and then you say, ‘Now what? Now what do I have to say?'”
~ Jodie Foster