By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

TELLURIDE FILM FESTIVAL’S 40TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION COMES TO A CLOSE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Telluride, CO, September 2, 2013 – Telluride Film Festival (August 29-September 2, 2013), presented by the National Film Preserve, draws to a close today following a spectacular five-day anniversary presentation of diverse programming, surprise screenings and special guests attended by more than 4,000 movie lovers.

Telluride Film Festival curated over 100 programs representing twenty-five countries including twenty-seven new feature films in its main program; six film revivals selected by returning Guest Directors: Don Delillo, Buck Henry, Phillip Lopate, Michael Ondaatje, B. Ruby Rich and Salman Rushdie; twelve Backlot programs; six revival programs; 33 shorts and/or student films, and hosted twelve seminars and conversations between festival guests.

“We are overwhelmed at the level of talent we have seen at this year’s 40th Telluride Film Festival,” commented Festival co-founder and artistic director Tom Luddy. “We are privileged to be able to present the world’s best in cinema, surrounded by friends old and new. What a wonderful way to celebrate our anniversary.”

Four Sneak Previews that screened outside the official program were Steve McQueen’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE (U.S., 2013), which appeared with cast members Brad Pitt, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael Fassbender and Lupita Nyong’o; Denis Villeneuve’s PRISONERS (U.S., 2013) with Villeneuve in person; Shane Salerno’s SALINGER with Salerno and AE Hotchner via Skype and panelists David Shields, Buddy Squires, Jean Miller and Dylan Sellers in person; and Kathleen Kennedy and Frank Marshall presented Hayao Miyazaki’s THE WIND RISES (Japan, 2013), and announced that it will be Miyazaki’s last film.

In a statement released yesterday from Frank Marshall by Telluride Film Festival, he said, “We were extremely honored to present Hayao Miyazaki’s latest masterpiece, “The Wind Rises.”  But it was a bittersweet moment for us, as we also announced his retirement from directing, making this his last feature film.”

Previously announced Telluride Film Festival Silver Medallion awards, given to recognize an artist’s significant contribution to the world of cinema, went to Robert Redford; T Bone Burnett and the Coen Brothers; and Mohammad Rasoulof.

Additional 40th Telluride Film Festival guests and program participants include: Yuval Adler, The Alloy Orchestra, the Americans, Michael Barker, Ritesh Batra, Sarah-Violet Bliss, Frances Bodomo, David Cairns, Patrick Cazals, J.C. Chandor, Ethan Clarke, Philippe Claudel, Linda Jones Clough, Francis For Coppola, Gia Coppola, Mark Cousins, Alfonso Cuarón, Jonás Cuarón, John Curran, Mark Danner, Robyn Davidson, Don DeLillo, Bruce Dern, Tony Donoghue, Paul Duane, Geoff Dyer, Adèle Exarchopoulos, Mitra Farahani, Asghar Farhadi, Battiste Fenwick, Ralph Fiennes, Joey Figueroa, Michael Fitzgerald, Scott Foundas, Robin Frohardt, Alberto Fuguet, Paulina García, Dan Geller, Jonathan Glazer, Dayna Goldfine, Emily Harrold, Buck Henry, Werner Herzog, Agnieszka Holland, John Horn, Bob Hurwitz, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Annette Insdorf, Oscar Isaac, Tim Jenison, Barry Jenkins, Tamara Jenkins, Penn Jillette, Esther Julie-Anne, Abdellatif Kechiche, Dieter Kosslick, Zak Knutson, Andrej Landin, Sebastián Lelio, Mark Levinson, Phillip Lopate, Colin MacCabe, David Mackenzie, Lauren MacMullan, Emilio Maille, Leonard Maltin, Joshua Marston, Joyce Maynard, Todd McCarthy, Jean Miller, Monique Montgomery, Errol Morris, Dario Nardi, Gregory Nava, Michael Ondaatje, Rithy Panh, Tatiana Pauhofová, Pawel Pawlikowski, Alexander Payne, Nicolas Philibert, Bill Plympton, Michael Pollan, Punch Brothers, Josh Radnor, Tahar Rahim, Alejandro Ramirez, Kirill Razlogov, Godfrey Reggio, Jason Reitman, B. Ruby Rich, Rob Richert, Pierre Rissient, A.V. Rockwell, Bobby Roth, Salman Rushdie, Lisanne Sartor, Dylan Sellers, Léa Seydoux, David Shields, Buddy Squires, Barry Sonnenfeld, Jordana Spiro, Milos Stehlik, Matt Steinauer, Dean Tavoularis, Teller, Gabriel Thibaudeau, David Thomson, Agata Trzebuchowska, Paolo Cherchi Usai, Mia Wasikowska, Alice Waters, Todd Wiseman, Joey Xanders, Sara Zandieh and Farley Ziegler.

Previously announced new feature films that played in the official 40th Telluride Film Festival main program:

·       ALL IS LOST (d. J.C. Chandor, U.S., 2013)

·       BEFORE THE WINTER CHILL (d. Philippe Claudel, France, 2013)

·       BETHLEHEM (d. Yuval Adler, Israel, 2013)

·       BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR (d. Abdellatif Kechiche, France, 2013)

·       BURNING BUSH (d. Agnieszka Holland, Czech Republic, 2013)

·       DEATH ROW: BLAINE MILAM + ROBERT FRATTA (d. Werner Herzog, U.S., 2013)

·       FIFI HOWLS FROM HAPPINESS (d. Mitra Farahani, U.S., 2013)

·       THE GALAPAGOS AFFAIR: SATAN CAME TO EDEN (d. Dan Geller, Dayna Goldfine, U.S., 2013)

·       GLORIA (d. Sebastián Lelio, Chile, 2013)

·       GRAVITY (d. Alfonso Cuarón, U.S./U.K., 2013)

·       IDA (d. Pawel Pawlikowski, Poland, 2013)

·       INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS (d. Joel and Ethan Coen, U.S., 2013)

·       THE INVISIBLE WOMAN (d. Ralph Fiennes, U.K., 2013)

·       LABOR DAY (d. Jason Reitman, U.S., 2013)

·       THE LUNCHBOX (d. Ritesh Batra, India, 2013)

·       LA MAISON DE LA RADIO (d. Nicolas Philibert, France, 2013)

·       MANUSCRIPTS DON’T BURN (d. Mohammad Rasoulof, Iran, 2013)

·       THE MISSING PICTURE (d. Rithy Panh, Cambodia/France, 2013)

·       NEBRASKA (d. Alexander Payne, U.S., 2013)

·       PALO ALTO (d. Gia Coppola, U.S., 2013)

·       THE PAST (d. Asghar Farhadi, France/Italy, 2013)

·       SLOW FOOD STORY (d. Stefano Sardo, Italy, 2013)

·       STARRED UP (d. David Mackenzie, U.K., 2013)

·       TIM’S VERMEER (d. Teller, U.S., 2013)

·       TRACKS (d. John Curran, Australia, 2013)

·       UNDER THE SKIN (d. Jonathan Glazer, U.K., 2013)

·       THE UNKNOWN KNOWN (d. Errol Morris, U.S., 2013)

 

Previously announced films screened in The Backlot program:

·       HERE BE DRAGONS (d. Mark Cousins, U.K., 2013)

·       JODOROWSKY’S DUNE (d. Frank Pavich, U.S./France, 2013)

·       LOCATIONS: LOOKING FOR RUSTY JAMES (d. Alberto Fuguet, Chile, 2013) select screening will be followed by Francis Ford Coppola’s RUMBLE FISH (U.S., 1983)

·       NATAN (d. David Cairns, Paul Duane, Ireland, 2013)

·       MILIUS (d. Zak Knutson, Joey Figueroa, U.S., 2013)

·       MULTIPLE VISIONS, THE CRAZY MACHINE (d. Emilio Maille, Mexico, 2012)

·       MUSIDORA, THE TENTH MUSE (d. Patrick Cazals, France, 2013)

·       PARTICLE FEVER (d. Mark Levinson, U.S., 2013)

·       REMEMBRANCE – A SMALL MOVIE ABOUT OUUL IN THE 1950s (d. Peter Von Bagh, Finland, 2013)

·       ROAD MOVIE: A PORTRAIT OF JOHN ADAMS (d. Mark Kidel, U.K., 2013)

·       A STORY OF CHILDREN AND FILM (d. Mark Cousins, U.K., 2013)

40th Telluride Film Festival was dedicated to Les Blank (1935-2013); Roger Ebert (1942-2013); George Gund (1937-2013); and Donald Richie (1924-2013).

A complete list of 40th Telluride Film Festival films and events is available at: www.telluridefilmfestival.org

About Telluride Film Festival

The prestigious Telluride Film Festival ranks among the world’s best film festivals and is an annual gathering for film industry insiders, cinema enthusiasts, filmmakers and critics. TFF is considered a major launching ground for the fall season’s most talked-about films. Founded in 1974, Telluride Film Festival, presented in the beautiful mountain town of Telluride, Colorado, is a four-day international educational event celebrating the art of film. Telluride Film Festival’s long-standing commitment is to join filmmakers and film connoisseurs together to experience great cinema. The exciting schedule, kept secret until Opening Day, consists of over two dozen filmmakers presenting their newest works, special Guest Director programs, three major Tributes to guest artists, special events and remarkable treasures from the past. Telluride Film Festival is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit educational program. Festival headquarters are in Berkeley, CA.

About Our Sponsors

Telluride Film Festival is supported by Land Rover North America, Turner Classic Movies, EY, Film Finances, Inc., Audible.com, Telluride Mountain Village Owners Association, Meyer Sound, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Bombardier Business Aircraft, Participant Media, Universal Studios, Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, Américas Film Conservancy, The London Hotels, Pine Ridge Vineyards, Telluride Foundation, UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television, Teatulia Organic Teas, Dolby, Telluride Alpine Lodging, Crumpler, ShopKeep POS, New Sheridan Hotel, The Hollywood Reporter, Cinedigm, Boston Light and Sound, among others.

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This is probably going to sound petty, but Martin Scorsese insisting that critics see his film in theaters even though it’s going straight to Netflix and then not screening it in most American cities was a watershed moment for me in this theatrical versus streaming debate.

I completely respect when a filmmaker insists that their movie is meant to be seen in the theater, but the thing is, you got to actually make it possible to see it in the theater. Some movies may be too small for that, and that’s totally OK.

When your movie is largely financed by a streaming service and is going to appear on that streaming service instantly, I don’t really see the point of pretending that it’s a theatrical film. It just seems like we are needlessly indulging some kind of personal fantasy.

I don’t think that making a feature film length production that is going to go straight to a video platform is some sort of “step down.“ I really don’t. Theatrical exhibition as we know it is dying off anyway, for a variety of reasons.

I should clarify myself because this thread is already being misconstrued — I’m talking about how the movie is screened in advance. If it’s going straight to Netflix, why the ritual of demanding people see it in the theater?

There used to be a category that everyone recognized called “TV movie” or “made for television movie” and even though a lot of filmmakers considered that déclassé, it seems to me that probably 90% of feature films fit that description now.

Atlantis has mostly sunk into the ocean, only a few tower spires remain above the waterline, and I’m increasingly at peace with that, because it seems to be what the industry and much of the audience wants. We live in an age of convenience and information control.

Only a very elite group of filmmakers is still allowed to make movies “for theaters“ and actually have them seen and judged that way on a wide scale. Even platform releasing seems to be somewhat endangered. It can’t be fought. It has to be accepted.

9. Addendum: I’ve been informed that it wasn’t Scorsese who requested that the Bob Dylan documentary only be screened for critics in theaters, but a Netflix representative indicated the opposite to me, so I just don’t know what to believe.

It’s actually OK if your film is not eligible for an Oscar — we have a thing called the Emmys. A lot of this anxiety is just a holdover from the days when television was considered culturally inferior to theatrical feature films. Everybody needs to just get over it.

In another 10 to 20 years they’re probably going to merge the Emmys in the Oscars into one program anyway, maybe they’ll call it the Contentys.

“One of the fun things about seeing the new Quentin Tarantino film three months early in Cannes (did I mention this?) is that I know exactly why it’s going to make some people furious, and thus I have time to steel myself for the takes.

Back in July 2017, when it was revealed that Tarantino’s next project was connected to the Manson Family murders, it was condemned in some quarters as an insulting and exploitative stunt. We usually require at least a fig-leaf of compassion for the victims in true-crime adaptations, and even Tarantino partisans like myself – I don’t think he’s made a bad film yet – found ourselves wondering how he might square his more outré stylistic impulses with the depiction of a real mass murder in which five people and one unborn child lost their lives.

After all, it’s one thing to slice off with gusto a fictional policeman’s ear; it’s quite another to linger over the gory details of a massacre that took place within living memory, and which still carries a dread historical significance.

In her essay The White Album, Joan Didion wrote: “Many people I know in Los Angeles believe that the Sixties ended abruptly on August 9, 1969, ended at the exact moment when word of the murders on Cielo Drive traveled like brushfire through the community, and in a sense this is true.”

Early in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, as Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt’s characters drive up the hill towards Leo’s bachelor pad, the camera cranes up gently to reveal a street sign: Cielo Drive. Tarantino understands how charged that name is; he can hear the Molotov cocktails clinking as he shoulders the crate.

As you may have read in the reviews from Cannes, much of the film is taken up with following DiCaprio and Pitt’s characters – a fading TV actor and his long-serving stunt double – as they amusingly go about their lives in Los Angeles, while Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is a relatively minor presence. But the spectre of the murders is just over the horizon, and when the night of the 9th finally arrives, you feel the mood in the cinema shift.

No spoilers whatsoever about what transpires on screen. But in the audience, as it became clear how Tarantino was going to handle this extraordinarily loaded moment, the room soured and split, like a pan of cream left too long on the hob. I craned in, amazed, but felt the person beside me recoil in either dismay or disgust.

Two weeks on, I’m convinced that the scene is the boldest and most graphically violent of Tarantino’s career – I had to shield my eyes at one point, found myself involuntarily groaning “oh no” at another – and a dead cert for the most controversial. People will be outraged by it, and with good reason. But in a strange and brilliant way, it takes Didion’s death-of-the-Sixties observation and pushes it through a hellfire-hot catharsis.

Hollywood summoned up this horror, the film seems to be saying, and now it’s Hollywood’s turn to exorcise it. I can’t wait until the release in August, when we can finally talk about why.

~ Robbie Collin