By Jake Howell jake.howell@utoronto.ca

Countdown to Cannes: Takashi Miike

TAKASHI MIIKE

Background: Japanese; born Yao, Osaka, Japan, 1960.

Known for / style: 13 Assassins (2010), Ichi the Killer (2001), Audition (1999); an eclectic promiscuity of genre play, including martial arts extravaganzas, family-friendly films, and crime dramas; excessive, cartoonish violence and sexual themes; releasing some titles directly-to-video.

Notable accolades: In his home country, the Japanese Professional Movie Awards have been kind to Miike, handing him five Best Director wins (1997’s Rainy Dog and Young Thugs: Innocent Blood, 2000’s The Guys from Paradise, 2001’s Visitor Q and Ichi the Killer), a Best Film nod (Ichi the Killer), and finally the title of Movie King of the 1990s in 2001. Outside of Japan, Miike snagged both a FIPRESCI prize and the KNF Award for Audition (the KNF Award, oddly, is given to “the best feature film that has yet to find distribution within the Netherlands”). In 2010, Venice gave a Future Film Festival Digital Award (Special Mention) to Miike’s 13 Assassins.

Previous Cannes appearances: Miike has played the Croisette twice: once in Competition (2011’s 3D Hara-Kiri: Death of a Samurai) and once out of Competition (For Love’s Sake, 2012). Hara-Kiri was the first 3D film ever to screen in Competition.

Film he’s bringing to Cannes: Wara no Tate (Shield of Straw), a police thriller based on Kazuhiro Kiuchi’s best-selling novel of the same name. Takao Osawa (from Japanese TV show Jin) and Nanako Matsushima (I am Mita, Your Housekeeper) star as two cops tasked with escorting a convicted killer across Japan. Getting in the way are ruthless bounty hunters, eager to cash in on the head of the killer (played by Tatsuya Fujiwara, Death Note).

Could it win the Palme? While no director is truly exempt from winning the Palme d’Or, it would appear Miike’s latest thriller has the Japanese equivalent of “zilch” at taking home the prize. Cannes is not exactly known for awarding by-the-numbers action movies (2011’s Best Director-winning Drive resists genre conformity), and the film is released today in Japan—the latter point hurting Miike’s chances in the long run. The film may not be Miike’s best work: Time Out Tokyo gave the film two stars (out of five) on April 18, writing: Wara no Tate is “slick, empty, and rather dim.” If a local critic can’t get down with Miike’s latest, it ain’t looking good for the rest of us. The Japan Times review of the film is slightly sunnier (giving Miike three out of five stars), but that’s still less than stellar. If Miike has a friend on the jury, it’s director Naomi Kawase—a Japanese compatriot who may have a hell of a time convincing her fellow members that Wara no Tate is worth its weight in gold. Given her influences, though, that seems highly unlikely.

Why you should care: Miike releases so many films that it’s hard to get overly excited for a reportedly lesser entry. Still, Miike has produced at least one masterpiece in his prolific career (13 Assassins tops out at 96% on Rotten Tomatoes). Either way, with an explosive trailer and a strong cast, genre fans can look forward to a fun blitz through urban Japan. Wara no Tate could be just a good ol’ time at the movies, not the arthouse favorite that the Competition would ordinarily prize. And there’s nothing wrong with that.

One Response to “Countdown to Cannes: Takashi Miike”

  1. prunktanner says:

    A magician, for sure.

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“Let me try and be as direct as I possibly can with you on this. There was no relationship to repair. I didn’t intend for Harvey to buy and release The Immigrant – I thought it was a terrible idea. And I didn’t think he would want the film, and I didn’t think he would like the film. He bought the film without me knowing! He bought it from the equity people who raised the money for me in the States. And I told them it was a terrible idea, but I had no say over the matter. So they sold it to him without my say-so, and with me thinking it was a terrible idea. I was completely correct, but I couldn’t do anything about it. It was not my preference, it was not my choice, I did not want that to happen, I have no relationship with Harvey. So, it’s not like I repaired some relationship, then he screwed me again, and I’m an idiot for trusting him twice! Like I say, you try to distance yourself as much as possible from the immediate response to a movie. With The Immigrant I had final cut. So he knew he couldn’t make me change it. But he applied all the pressure he could, including shelving the film.”
James Gray

“I’m an unusual producer because I control the destiny of a lot of the films I’ve done. Most of them are in perfect states of restoration and preservation and distribution, and I aim to keep them in distribution. HanWay Films, which is my sales company, has a 500-film catalogue, which is looked after and tended like a garden. I’m still looking after my films in the catalogue and trying to get other people to look after their films, which we represent intellectually, to try to keep them alive. A film has to be run through a projector to be alive, unfortunately, and those electric shadows are few and far between now. It’s very hard to go and see films in a movie house. I was always involved with the sales and marketing of my films, right up from The Shout onwards. I’ve had good periods, but I also had a best period because the film business was in its best period then. You couldn’t make The Last Emperor today. You couldn’t make The Sheltering Sky today. You couldn’t make those films anymore as independent films. There are neither the resources nor the vision within the studios to go to them and say, “I want to make a film about China with no stars in it.”Then, twenty years ago, I thought, “OK, I’m going to sell my own films but I don’t want to make it my own sales company.” I wanted it to be for me but I wanted to make it open for every other producer, so they don’t feel that they make a film but I get the focus. So, it’s a company that is my business and I’m involved with running it in a certain way, but I’m not seen as a competitor with other people that use it. It’s used by lots of different producers apart from me. When I want to use it, however, it’s there for me and I suppose I’m planning to continue making all my films to be sold by HanWay. I don’t have to, but I do because it’s in my building and the marketing’s here, and I can do it like that. Often, it sounds like I’m being easy about things, but it’s much more difficult than it sounds. It’s just that I’ve been at it for a long time and there’s lots of fat and security around my business. I know how to make films, but it’s not easy—it’s become a very exacting life.”
~ Producer Jeremy Thomas