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Ray Pride

By Ray Pride Pride@moviecitynews.com

True/False And The Tradition Of The March March

Come rain, shine or snow—sometimes all three at once—the True/False film festival christens its long-end-of February-start-of-March weekend with a March March through the streets of Columbia, Missouri on March 1, led by costumed locals of all ages and levels of creative investment. In 2008, the March was led by Chicago’s punk marching band, Mucca Pazza, who didn’t take to the streets this year, but to the stage of the Missouri Theater soon after. Still, there were goofy and inscrutable costumes that may or may not relate to any nonfiction films, as well as a few hundred happy faces, drumming, and snowflakes making everything more brisk. Plus bicycle wheels held aloft in flames.

March 0000

And a polar bear shall guide the way.

March 00

Dozens more gathered at the Boone County Courthouse. A surly young guard shouted at anyone framing their friends against the building. “You can’t photograph the building! Stop taking pictures of the building! It is NOT allowed!”

March 000

Handmade flags of the ten-year-old T/F logo dotted the parade route.

Pre-March March from Ray Pride on Vimeo.

March 2

Costumes, masks, a touch of a romp of Carnivale in Columbia.

March 3

March 1

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March March from Ray Pride on Vimeo. Blink and you’ll miss a filmmaker twice nominated for an Oscar.

March 5

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