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By DP30 david@thehotbuttonl.com

DP/30 @ SXSW: Short Term 12, actor Brie Larson

4 Responses to “DP/30 @ SXSW: Short Term 12, actor Brie Larson”

  1. Lex says:

    Wait this is that hot chick from SCREAM 4 and FIVE YEAR ENGAGEMENT? Doesn’t even look like her.

  2. SamLowry says:

    Well, she is 23, so I guess on the Lex Scale she qualifies for AARP membership.

    (…and she was also the ex-GF from Hades in Scott Pilgrim. Gotta get that Pilgrim reference in there.)

    (…and I’m also glad to see her mug does say “Keep Calm and Carry On”–I’m starting to get really tired of The Chive.)

  3. Don R. Lewis says:

    I just met her tonight and am excited to see this interview. Talk about a genuinely NICE and intelligent woman….she’s awesome. So psyched SHORT TERM 12 won the narrative feature award tonight at SXSW too, I’m seeing it tomorrow. I cannot recommend Daniel Destin Crettin’s first feature I AM NOT A HIPSTER highly enough. Seek it out, it’s absolutely not waht you think.

  4. The Pope says:

    Ladies and Gentlemen,
    We give you the next Tracy Flick. Ambition. Youth. Energy. Intelligence. Confidence. Poise.

    And happily, in the eyes of this observer at least, completely lacking the unconscionable morass of self-entitlement that Flick had in abundance. Can’t wait to see how far she goes.

    Nice interview, David. Thanks.

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DP/30

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DENNIS COOPER

The next thing that really changed my world and thoroughly influenced my writing were the films of Robert Bresson. When I discovered them in the late seventies, I felt I had found the final ingredient I needed to write the fiction I wanted to write.

INTERVIEWER

What was the final ingredient?

DENNIS COOPER

Recognizing that the films were entirely about emotion and, to me, ­ profoundly moving while, at the same time, stylistically inexpressive and monotonic. On the surface, they were nothing but style, and the style was extremely rigorous to boot, but they seemed almost transparent and purely content driven. Bresson’s use of untrained nonactors influenced my concentration on characters who are amateurs or noncharacters or characters who are ill equipped to handle the job of manning a story line or holding the reader’s attention in a conventional way. Altogether, I think Bresson’s films had the greatest influence on my work of any art I’ve ever encountered. In fact, the first fiction of mine that was ever published was a chapbook called “Antoine Monnier,” which was a god-awful, incompetent attempt to rewrite Bresson’s film Le diable ­probablement as a pornographic novella. So I came to writing novels through a channel that included experimental fiction, poetry, and nonliterary influences pretty much exclusively. I never read normal novels with any real interest or close attention.
~ Dennis Cooper Discovers Bresson

The whole world within reach.
~ Filmmaker Peter Hutton

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